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Full text of "Compute! Magazine Issue 131"

COMPLETE GUIDE TO OVER 200 JUMBO HARD DRIVES! 




zitH 



JULY 1 991 



TBI TIPS FOR TECH SUPIN 
THE BODY SILICON 





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FAST. 

GeoWorks 
Ensemble's 
built-in scalable 
typefaces save 



you time because what you see on 
screen is exoctly what you will get— I 
will look right the Hrst time you printi 



FUN. 

Have fun wiffi 
EnsemtJie^s tJullNii 
outline typefaces 
to express your 
Wess bofdbf, elesatjtfy, or even play- 
tally. Wfiea documents look ttils ^oo<} 
and tfiis ProfessionaL so will you. 




EASY. 

X'Viih Ensembk. 

creating doai- 

menis that look 

professicmily 

published 15 as ensii a? clicking a 





mYg 



What you see is >vtiat you get 



URW Roman 



URW Sans 



Cooperstown 



URW Sans 



Superb 



URW Mono 



Cranbrook 





Software Publish^ 
Excellence in Sofi 

• Critics Choice 

• Best Creativity/Pr 

• Best Consumer Pi 
^BestNcwUseof 



Meflnes PC Perfomimi 



rnlil iifiw. llir only WMV In ifiipnnv 
Vi] [XTrnrmaiicr wms lo hiiy iirw lianl- 
ware. Xol any niorp. Itilnnlncin^^ ( Jco- 
Works Ensptnliler seven [ir(nlnrliM*ty 
appliralinns inlri>Ta1r(| in an ania/.ini^- 
<n"a[)liiral windrmin^- riivinmnirnl rallrd 



slandanl (lol-tn;ilnx j>nnler tisinfr 
(irnWritt" and ^iroDraw." hvonrihr 
applicalions inrlndfd in (he Kiiscniblc 
|)ai-kaLip. Knscnihh' conibine.s on I line 
Innis and devirr^ inde[tenden1 i^rapln^-s 
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P(y(!E()Sr Snilware so inrredil)ly small Svi- Is Whal V(M[ (iel) nii-snven an<. 
and fast il will run rings arnnnd any on your |)rinti4: 

olherin-a[>hieal mvimn 
MieiiL And all on the 



Pdyon already own. 
Take tile ilncn- 
rnentsiiliove. They 
were produrnl (HI a 







\^,'haiy>Du s«« is vttuii you get 



EASY ''WHATVOU SEE ISWHATVOU GET** 

(WYSIWVQ} ON-SCREEN AND ON PAPER 

WITH ANY PC, AND ANY PRINTER. 



Any print ei". I'Yoin dot -matrix fo laser. 

Willi Knsemltle. text r-ini he 
smoolhly scaled IVnm i pt. {VuM] inch) 
lo 7U:2 pi. (II ineli hio:h eharaeters). 
Addilionally text and grafiliirsran he 
strelelird to any size or reflated huiny 
angle. And Kiisi^nihle is prerisely timed 
(o Ihe maximmn printing resolution of 
over-ioO prinlers. so rhanef^s areyoirll 
he prodneiriJLi- dazzling ly[>eset-l(M)king 
dtiiinnents in niinnles. 

Boiler stilt, y<M( can keep righl on 
working win l(^ yon [Mini. Knsemhles 
mtilli-laskiimsvsleni lets von start the 




sociation 
1990 



mputing 




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J (.v.-*4C»»*!ir* 



W PRODUCT** 

■te- OF THE ^ 

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a<>.' So>^cr« >Vw, 



.../t technically impressive product 

regardless of hardware platform, 

[GeoWorksj Ensemble provides snappy 

performance on anv hard disk-equipped 

PQ even an 8088, 

PC Computing 

(GeoWorksj has produced a GUI capable 

of making the PC a more friendly and 

powerfid creature to the millions of 

people Windows and OS/2 have left 

behind,., 

FIRST LOOKS, PC Magazine 

[PC/GEOS] thrives in a 640K 286, and 
even performs respectably on an 8088. 
On a run-ofthe-mill 386, [PC/GEOSI 
peforms crisply in a way that Windows 
only dreams of,,, 
PC Magazjiie 

GeoWorks PC/GEOS: What Wifidows 3,0 
Should Have Been. 
INFO WORLD 

The Geos environment sports a simplified 
(but .sharper-looking) Wind(jws like inter- 
face with many of the ,same features, 
comes with Ensemble (a bigger and more 
capable suite of applications), and runs 
lickety-splir on h0286s and XTs. 
PC WORLD 






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StaitimMth The Way You Mit. 



iirxl creatidii while the 
(irst smoothly prints in 
lli(^ background. Or yon 
niighl check out one of 
the many olherappliea- 
tions included in Ensem- 
ble, like (ieoManageir a 
gniphicd file nuuiager. 
fteoDex" an electronic 
addn^s.s book, Geo- 

Plannerr a cdendar/schedular. America 
Onlinef im easy to use electronic mail 
and lelecommunications service <-om- 
necliniir vou to thousands of PC users 




and a wide vmety of 
iu formation services; or 
the Cfdculaloi; notepad, 

banner maker, and soli- 
laifvgamr. all included 
ill (lir lMis('inbl(* 
parkiij^^r. I 

llard to believe. 
rightf State-of-the-art 
pfTtbrmance on your 
rxisting PC? Maybe thafs why JMisem- 
bk* has won so many awards in its first 
fpw inotilhs. But don't lake our word for 
it, check out what the industn^ experts 



tS?"?!! 



cire saying (we |)rinled a lew (luotes 
cii)Ove). Or lake us up on our Working 
xModel offer, so you can be the judgt'. 
GeoWorks Ens(^ml)le, because 

perfonuancf^ is defin(Ml as much by the 
soli ware in tlie P(! as Ihv hardware it 
mns on. 




FULL W ORKING MODEL* $9.95! 
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[WHmtmbticinJWWorkv. (inAVorks Eii?iPinliK HiAifns. (M'liWrili'. 
iptiPlanner are Irad^mnrts nf Gf^iWnrts. Fnr. All "Ihcr fHiMliJils nrc Irail'iiiarks wf their rf>>ii>rctivf holilers. ©IMI 



l*'nl>inw. ( iiviMiK.ip r. ( \m]h% mid 



ODnnpuTE 



JULY 1991 



VOLUME 13-NO. 7 -ISSUE 131 



Editorial License 6 

PETER SCISCO 

Computer lechnology has broughi the 
possibility of better heahh manage- 
meni, if not better health, to all of us. 
computer users and Luddites ahke. 
News & Notes 8 

ALAN R, BECHTOLD 
A chair that's smarter than your TV, a 
100-MHz 486 processor chip from In- 
leL a PageMaker with its own word 
processor, a hghtning chip from Big 
Blue, a less-expensive SuperCafcx an- 
other look at PC graphics tablets, and 
more notes on the nei^'s. 
Feedback 16 

READERS 

An electronic link to people, a warning 
to IDE hard disk o\^iiers. slots of ex- 
pansion questions, troubling memo- 
ries, and more questions from our 
readers. 
Fast Facts 144 

EDITORS 

Did your favorite program receive one 
of the SEVs Excellence in Software 
A\vards? Find out in this issue's quick 
look at important information. 



rN FOCUS 



14 



SharePak 

RICHARD C.LEINECKHR 
This month's SharePakdhk contains 
three powerful programs to help you 
stay productive when you're on the 
road this summer. 
Heal Yoursetf: Health and 
Computers 18 

GREGG KEIZER 
fn this feature, contributing editor 
Gregg Keizer explores the question of 
whether or not \our PC can help you 
live a hcalihier. happier life. Examine 
the technology, the products, and the 
trends that are shaping the way we use 
computer in the worlds of medicine, 
sports, and personal nutrition. 

TEST LAB 

Fax Cards and Modems in 
Grueling Tests 25 

In this issue s Test Lab we benchmark 
and review a wide range of iax, mo- 
dem, and fax/modem devices designed 
lo make telecommunicating easy from 
your home, your office, or on the road. 
Check ihese fax before you buy. 




TECH SUPPORT 



50 



HJROMASMA SUGIURA/WESTLIGHT INTERNATIONAL 

ON THE COVER 

Hiromasma Sugiura employed ray-tracing techniques 

on an NEC computer to develop the art featured on 

our July cover. 



COMPUTE Ytour Cwnplsla Honw Computer Resource (tSSW 0194-357X) is pub**he(J montW^ in 
the Untied Stales and Canada tjy COMPUTE Publicatians Internaticinal Lid,. 1965 Bfoadvway, Ntew 
YOfk. N¥ 10023-5965 Wtne 13, Numt>er 7. issue 131 Copyn^ © 1991 tjy COMPUTE Pubicatiais 
International Ltd AH nghis reserved Tel, (212) 496-6100. COMPUTE is z registered (rademark ol 
COMPUTE PubJjcatitjns Iniernalonaf Ltd. Pnntsd in the USA and distrtbuied v«orldw<ie by Gums 
Crculation Company, PO Box 9102, Pfennsauken, NJ 08109. SecorKk:Jsss postage pad at IM^^ 
Vortt. NY and at additKxial mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address ctianges to COMPUTE 
Maijiiiine. PO Box 3245 Harlan, lA 51S37-3041, Tef. (800} 727-6937, Enbre contents copyri^ted 
AH rignis reserved Nothing may be reproduced in whole or m part withoul wtiiten permisson from the 
pubiishQt Sut>safpt!ons LS. AFO * SI 9,94 one year. Canada and etsewhere <• S25.94 one year. Smgle 
cop«$ S2 95 in US T>w pubttsher tisdaims all respoosibifJlv to return unsolicrted matter, and alt n^ts 
m portions pubKshed Thweot remain the sole property of COMPUTE PutJJica&ors Inter nabonar Ltd. 
Letters sent lo COMPUTE or its edrtors become the property ot the noagazine. Ediionat of fees are 
locaied at 324 Went Mbndovsr Avenue, State 200, Greer^boro. NC 2740a Tel. (919] 275-3809. 



How to Install a Hani 
Disk 

MARKMINASl 

Sooner or later, you 11 wani lo upgrade 
your system v^iih a new hard disk. Put- 
ting in your own disk saves a loi of 
money and gives you a better under- 
standing of how your PC works. In this 
article, our resident hardware guru di- 
rects users, step by step, through the in- 
stallation process. 

Online 59 

DEMNVATKIN 

Get on the net and meet famous— and 
infamous— people. 

Point & Click 60 

CLIFTON KLARNES 
IVindows applications can be expen- 
sive, but you don't have to pay big 
bucks for powerful IVindows 
programs. 

Buyer's Guide to Jumbo 
Hard Drives 61 

DAVID SEARS 

You're ready to make the upgrade to a 
larger hard disk, but you're not sure 
what kind to get. Before you shop, read 
this comprehensive guide to hard disks 
that hold more than 100 megab\ies of 
data. 

Programming Power 67 
TOM CAMPBELL 
Explore the innovations and power of 
iheC^r language. 

Tips & Tools 69 

READERS 

Saving your setup configuration can 
save you hours of frustration if your 
system goes down. Here's a BASIC 
program for automatically restoring 
your configuration. Also, some undoc- 
umented help for low-Ievel formats of 
the IBM PS/2 line, getting more from 
Windows by setting up a permanent 
swapfilc, making a BASIC program 
leaner and meaner, and mone. 

Disk Update 7t 

JOYCE SIDES 

Reading ASIC from our disk menu 
program, gnphic enhancements to 
COMPVTE's Menu Operating System, 
solving DOS and DISKTUlK incom- 
patibilities, suggestions for Poh^Copy. 
mouse and Tandv problems with 
COMPUTKCak and hunting the right 
^\\\m\h AC Hunter. 



Think small. 




(Small prices that is.) 




Our philosophy is simple: Good software doesn't have to 
cost hundreds of dollars. At Parsons Technology, we create 
excellent software— keep prices reasonable— and back 
every product with ftee, unlimited technical support, solid 
documentation and an ironclad satisfaction guarantee. 
Share our philosophy? Great, 
Choose one of the following programs 
for a no-risk 30-day trial To order or 
" request a free catalog, call us toll-free at 
1-800-223-6925. 
MoneyCounts*- A complete money 
management system. Handles small business accounting as 
well as family budgets. Writes checks, estimates your taxes 
and it's simple to use— no accounting experience required. 
Just S35. 

It's Legal"— Helps you pro- 
tect your family and your assets 
with all the legal documents 
you're ever likely to need. Wills, 
Living Wills, Powers of Attorney, 
Guardianship Documents, Leases, 
Notes and Bill of Sale. Includes 
FREE set of powerftil legal letters, 
too. Just $49. 

QuickVerse^^— Imagine, the 




PC. Rapid word and phrase searches, study features like 

indexes and annotation. Choose King James, 
NIV, RSV, NKJV, or NRSV translation. Greek 
and Hebrew available separately. Word 
processor interface included free! Just $69, 

Diet Analyst— The total health 
improvement system. Easily manages 
your complete health program including cal- 
culating calories, tracking nutrients and cholesterol and 
monitoring exercise. Eat right and stay healthy! Just $59. 

Typing 101 —You don't need a faster computer — you 
need faster fingers! Typing 101 tutorial improves speed on 
all 101 keys of your PC keyboard. Uses artificial intelligence 
to match interesting exercises to your exact needs. Letter 
^^i^^^^^"*"^^^^-^ Blaster game included free. 

' Yes, rd like to get more software for my money! \ just S35. 



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Circle Reader Service Number 176 



ODnnpuTE 



IntroDOS 72 

TONY ROBERTS 

You can get more from your PC by 

fine-tuning your CON FIGS YS file. 

Learn everything you need to know 

about niES, BUFFERS, and 

FASTOPEN. 

Hardware Cfinic 73 

MARKMINASI 

Clean dectriciiy is becoming a part of 
the past. Here's how to protect your 
equipment and your data from power 
spikes and blackouts. 

Arts & Letters 75 

ROBERT BIXBV 

Windoivs comes with a buiil-in screen 
capture program, but it's not always 
the best solution. Here's a look ai some 
commercial programs that let you cap- 
ture ir/Wouj screens. 

Fast Forward 76 

DAVID ENGLISH 

No one in the industry is willing to de- 
fine multimedia. That makes it a 
squishy technology. 

HOME OFFICE 

WoriiPlace 78 

DANIEL JANAL 

Track the amount of time you spend 
on projects for your clients. Youll 
make more money, and your clients 
wll feel better about yoursemces. 
Tech Knowledge 80 

ROSALIND RESNICK and 
SUSIE ARCHER 

Your home computer has made you 
more productive than ever before. But 
what's that funny whirring sound com- 
ing from your disk drive? Our authorii 
provide ten top tips for securing tech- 
nical suppoit at home for your PC. So 
get ready with our tech help kit- 
before trouble strikes. 

DISCOVERY 

Pathways 84 

STEVEN ANZOVIN 
Computers can do higher mathemalics 
and play chess like the masters, but 
they still can't read. 
Risky Business 86 

HOWARD MILLMAN 
Complex computerized robots are be- 
ing designed and built to handle haz- 
ardous duty in both civilian and 
militar)' situations. Here's a look at the 
latest developments, straight from 
America's foremost labs. 




ENTERTAINMENT 



GamePlay 98 

ORSON SCOTT CARD 
Computer networks like Prodigy are 
making it easier for people to have fiin 
with computers. 
Taking the Sky 1 00 

RICHARD SHEFFIELD 
Our veteran simulation writer evalu- 
ates the new crop of \V\VI flight simu- 
lator games, including Red Bam, 
Knights of the Sky, and Blue Max. To 
make your flying easier, we've includ- 
ed an extensive chart of features. 

REVIEWS 

Reviews and analysis of software, 
books, and accessory products in the 
games, productivity, and learning 
areas. Complete uith our experts' 
COMPUTE Choice recommendations. 
Sneak Peeks 108 

ROBERT BIXBY and 
DENNY. -^TKIN 

Pint looks at the Sierra Network and 
Chuck Yeager's Air Combai. 
In-Oepth Evaluations 108 
ExcellO, Elvira, and SimEarth^mtr 
Choice notice. We also look at Space 
Quest n\ UMSIl CorelDR,4W!, WiH^ 
Maker, H ordStar Laptop Collection. 
Super Solvers Treasure Mountain!, 
Quest for Glory U, Zeliard. Lord of the 
Rings, Stickytear Word Scramble, 
Mickey's Colors and Shapes: The Daz- 
zling Magic Show, Mickey's I2S's: The 
Big Surprise Party, Micke\''s ABCs: A 
Day at the Fair, A rtbeats Full Page im- 
ages. Complete Laptop Computer 
Guide, Alex Randall's Used Computer 
Handbook The Computer Buyer 's 
Handbook, Cyberpunk and more. 



COMPUTE is looking for exceptional 
computer-generated art for use on fu- 
ture covers and with feature articles. If 
you're a computer artist interested in 
national exposure, send us examples of 
your work in either color slide or trans- 
parency format. Include a brief note 
listing the title of the work and the 
hardware and software used in its cre- 
ation. Please address your samples to 
Ad Director, COMPUTE PubliQtions 
International Limited. 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
NonhCarohna 27408. 



Sid Meier's 

Latest Game 

Is Just Like All 

IBs Others... 
Terrific! 



The Sid Meier Checklist For Fun: 
Challenge. Crimes arc l:>eLng 
perpetnucd, plots are 
ixMng iiatched. As .super- 
spy Max Remington, you 
must piece together 
ambiguous clues leading to a 
m til less criminal mastemiind. 
Wrecks, even months of 
intrigue-filled gaming time can 
he spent finding just one 
mastenuind. Covefi Action gives 
you 26 of them to foil. 

Versatility. Break into 
;riniinal hideouts with guns 
blazing; or try a subtler approach 
with delicate wiretaps, brilliant 
code-breaking and careful precise 
sur\*eillance. Mix and match 
investigative techniques, relying on 
instinct and experience. You make the 
decisions, detenu ine the strategy, and 
decide the tactics. 
Authenticity. Use the weapons real 
agents tise and follow their procedures. 
Face the same, real dangers. Covefi Action 
is international espionage as it really is. 

ENTERTAI/JMENT . SOFTWARE 

For IBM -PC/Tandy/compatibles. For the latest information on release dates and availabiiitles. call MicroProse Customer Service at 301 -771*1 151, 9 am 10 5 pm EST. weekdays. © 1991 
MicroProse Software, Inc.. 180 Lakefront Drive. Hunt Valley. MD 21030. 
• Software Publishers Association 

Circle Reader Service Numl>er 110 



Most game designers can't afford to 
repeat themselves, Fomiulas that work 
so well in one game rarely succeed in 
the next. Sid Meier is an exception. 
His games, despite the diversity of 
subject matter, always share certain 
qualities, qualities computer gamers 
have grown to lo\^e — ^ and 
demand. 

Now, the designer responsible 
for tlie award-winning hits F-15 
Strike Eagle, Pirates!, Red 
Storm Rising, F-19 Stealth 
Fighter and 1990\s Best 
Strategy Game*, Railroad 
Tycoon, presents the high- 
tech, dangerous wodd of 
international espionage. 
Once again the subject is 
unique; but Sid's ''magic 
touch" remains. 




"It is no exaggeration to say that MicroProse 
has released the richest treatment of espionage 
ever put in a computer game. Only the real thing 
could be more rigorous, and one imagines that it 
wouldn 't be nearly so much fun. '' 

Computer Gaming World • May, 1990 




EDITORLM LICENSE 



PETER SCISCO 



Good health is a lot like the weath- 
er: Everybody talks about it, but 
nobody does anything about it. 
Despite Madison Avenue's ef- 
forts to convince us we should be 
stair-stepping, bicycling, and jumping 
for our lives, most people are just too 
busy to do more than rush home and 
grab a sack of chips in time to catch a 
flick on HBO. 

Around the winter holidays, our 
thoughts turn to dieting, but we al- 
ways wait for the New Year so we can 
make a resolution out of all this good- 
health business. Another broken 
promise. Another guilty conscience. 
Another raid on the fridge. 

And then technology comes along 
to save us. From CAT scans to elec- 
tronic microscopy, from jogger logs to 
nutrition guides, computers have had 
an amazing impact on our health over 
the last 20 years. Take a look around 
your doctor's office. Everything is 
automated, from insurance fiHngs to 
blood analyzers. 

There's no question that com- 
puter technology has brought the pos- 
sibility of better health management, 



if not better health, to all of us, com- 
puter users and Luddites alike. Com- 
puters are good at counting numbers, 
at presenting facts we can compare 
and analyze, at turning raw data into 
charts and graphs we can pore over to 
our hearts' content. They can bring us 
to surprising conclusions in startling 
and innovative ways. That's the 
strength of technology and, in many 
ways, the basic pattern of healthy liv- 
ing — taking slock, analyzing, drawing 
conclusions, programming a solid nu- 
tritional base, establishing an effective 
exercise program. 

This is all on the bright side, but 
there's a dark side as well — a venera- 
ble hbrary of fact and folklore about 
the health risks of computers. Repeat- 
ed motions, like entering data with a 
keyboard for several hours a day, can 
lead to Repetitive Stress Injury or 
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. And al- 
though the effect of radiation from 
monitors, laser printers, and the rest 
of the electronic gear stashed in our 
homes is still a matter of debate, the 
discussions have become more agitat- 
ed, much like the arguments about the 




greenhouse effect. Only this time we 
aren't talking about global warming 
that might affect the earth in 30 years; 
we're talking about microwaving our 
bodies to an early grave. 

Fortunately, some manufacturers 
are concerned about health and com- 
puters, and they've answered with, for 
example, radiation screens and glare 
screens, extremely-low-frequency 
monitors, recycled toner cartridges, 
and recycled paper for packaging. 
Government and labor are taking a 
hard look at the situation as well — 
witness San Francisco's recent ordi- 
nance that sets health guidelines for 
computer operators. 

I grew up with stories about how 
NASA's space program contributed to 
the development of pacemakers and 
about how the miniaturization of elec- 
tronics contributed to the wonder ma- 
chines of microscopic investigation 
and surgery. 1 also heard that NASA 
gave us Tang and it probably spawned 
the idea for pate in a tube, an abomi- 
nation 1 hope not to see twice in one 
lifetime. 

In the future we'll have complete 
health-monitoring systems for our 
homes built around computer chips. 
Picture a small kitchen computer that 
tracks personal nutrition data for ev- 
ery member of the family. All of your 
data is encoded on a small data card, 
which you slip into the system like a 
bank card at an ATM. From the re- 
frigerator comes a suggestion for a bal- 
anced, personalized lunch. 

If you're low on staples, an elec- 
tronic shopper zips to the food market 
of your choice and places your order 
for delivery. The money is debited to 
your bank account. Your microwave 
sets itself for optimal cooking time. 
Calorie and nutrient information is 
stored in your personal database for 
future reference, and your data card is 
updated for the next meal. 

If this all sounds too George 
Jetson for you, pull your nose out of 
the funny papers. Many successful 
businesses have shown how computers 
can help to manage projects. And what 
better project than your health? B 



6 COMPUTE 



JULY 1 9 9 \ 




Design and Build 
Authentic Medieval Castle§l 

Wiih CASTLES'^' you can now design the layout of yo| 
own medieval dream casile. You'll need to 
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decide where to put towers, walls anOT- _ 

of gatehouse should you buiid? How high should the 
hauiemenis Ix*? How^i^pS^d pu make the , " 
orie-and liow much shotiki iliev l)e taxed? 



.f^ 



:-^* 



Itfr til* «Mfip«rt q| Ihv K«(a Cl*«rrfti 







els between the chute 



^pond tq pleas for help from 



301 .->.,,v,.,^ ^. a] 






fdom. Burden 
.jical demands. Tfien, 
ijiuuuy t)altles against the angr\\ 



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neir narcH*arne(2 



ieval ages a swell time are in this package! Z 

TASTLEf features: ^_ 

,256coloM'GAgnil)hks. 
' Full mtisiail score with nmjorsoumlhmfnf .Mi///yi/M. 
Biiikl mlwidiial castles or conquer the wild frontier 
iu an ei}ibt ^ame campaign. 
Cho(fSe k'tween realistic and matiical sellings. 
Ihree kmls of difficulty, from easy lo challeugiug. 



To order CASTLES'-^ 
calll-8(K)-965-Gr*^ 
Available on MS 
for SS9.95. Comirig 
s(K>n on Amiga ,,—. 
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3710S. Susan, Suite too 
Santa Ana, CA 92704 
(714)549-2411 




Circle Reader Service Number 1 56 




NEWS & NOTES 



PC Paper 

Computers have moved their users 
away from pen and paper. Now it a|> 
pears that users are moving back. For 
certain applications, keyboard input 
isn't always best. Sometimes — espe- 
cially when creating computer-aided 
art and design— it's better to be abfe 
to work with a pen in hand. It was this 
need, coupled with the growth of the 
field of Computer-Aided Design (CAD), 
that led to the birth of computer graph- 
ics tablets. These wonderful devices 
let you actually draw onscreen by trac- 
ipg outlines with a pen on a flat pad 
that loosely resembles a sheet of pa- 
per. Slowly, other applications have 
adopted the graphics tablet philoso- 
phy, now commonly referred to as 
pen-based computing. One computer 
manufacturer has even based its en- 
tire operating system on pen-based 
computing. 

Summagraphics, long a leader in 
graphics tablet manufacturing, wants 
to see widespread use of pen-based 
computing. Toward this goal, the com- 
pany is now planning to bundle its 
graphics tablets with Microsoft Pen 
Windows. The offer is designed to 
allow owners of desktop computers to 
upgrade their systems to take advan- 
tage of pen-based computing. Micro- 
soft Pen Windows combines the 
established Windows graphic user in- 
terface with handwriting and gesture 
recognition, making the creation of a 
fully pen-based system much easier. 
The combination of Microsoft Pen 
Windows and pen-based computing 
with handwriting recognition presents 
virtually endless possibilities for dis- 
tinct new markets for graphics tablets. 
These new markets will encompass 
general and new pen-based applica- 
tions. The greatest area of interest is in 
editing and manipulating figures (as in 
spreadsheets), but more will certainly 
appear. For more information about 
graphics tablets, contact Summagra- 
phics, 777 State Street Extension, 
Fairfield, Connecticut 06430. 



Three Reasons Why 

According to a new survey by COMTEC Market Analysis Services of the Gartner 
Group, the work-at-home industry has been most affected by personal comput- 
ers, cellular telephones, and facsimile machines. 

The survey tabulated information for approximately 45,000 households, rep- 
resenting a reasonable sample of the almost 90 million U.S. households as 
counted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. According to the report, 52 percent of 
all households still don't use any of the three information technologies— even at 
work— and only 3 percent make use of all three. PCs are now used in 42 percent 
of households surveyed, however, while only 7 percent use cellular telephones. 
The survey also found that T4 percent of homes using PCs own and use cellular 
telephones. Clearly, this indicates that households that adopt one technology are 
more likely to adopt others. 

An ongoing service since 1982, COMTEC Market Analysis Services studies 
the installed base of information Industry equipment and services — telecommu- 
nications, computers, and office equipment. For more information, contact COM- 
TEC Market Analysis Services, P.O. Box 10212, Stamford, Connecticut 06904. 



The Electric Chair 

Surely you have a favorite chair. Almost everyone does. One that just seems to 
fit you. It takes time to break in a favorite chair, molding it slowly, through hours 
of sitting and shifting in It, getting it to fit your exact shape like a glove. Fortunate- 
ly, a new microprocessor-based interactive chair might make all that sitting and 
shifting and waiting for comfort obsolete. The new chair Invented by Biomechan- 
ics Corporation of America (BCA) actually responds to each occupant's body by 
making hundreds of pressure-sensitive adjustments on its own, automatically 
providing a new level of seating comfort. 

Computer technology enables the new Intelligent Seat to learn about its oc- 
cupant, measure load distribution, rate the occupant's comfort, decide which ad- 
justments to make, automatically make those adjustments, and optimize seat 
comfort. Soon, every chair in the house might provide that coveted perfect fit. 
For additional information, contact Biomechanics, 1800 Walt Whitman Road, 
Melville, New York 11 747; (800) 248-3746 or (51 6) 752-3550. 



Speed and Capacity 

Not to be outdone by Intel's recent achievements, IBM scientists have managed 
to build what they refer to as the world's fastest high-capacity memory chip. The 
experimental chip can send or receive eight billion bits of information per second. 
The record breaker is a Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) chip that holds 
512 kilobits (524,288 bits) of information. 

The chip can read individual bits of information in four-billionths of a second, 
a benchmark known as access time. And it can read and write successive bits of 
information — a measure known as cycle time — in just two-blllionths of a second. 
The lightning chip holds the world speed records for both cycle and access time 
for memory chips with more than 64K (65,536) bits of Information storage. > 



8 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



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NEWS & NOTES 



0.10 GlgaHertz 



If you can imagine the current race for faster computers as resembling the India- 
napolis 500, Intel has just unveiled the Maserati of microprocessors. The new 
chip is a fully functional 486 microprocessor that operates at a truly blinding 100 
MHz, delivering approximately twice as many instructions per second as any 
microprocessor cunrently on the market. 

This new microchip contains 1.2 million transistors and uses a process tech- 
nology called CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) that minimizes 
the chip's electrical power consumption. Intel's new 100-MHz microprocessor 
features submicron line widths and three metal layers. One micron equals ap- 
proximately 0.01 times the thickness of a human hair. Submicrons, of course, are 
much smaller. 

Intel says it has no immediate plans to offer this 100-MHz device as a com- 
mercial product— but why else was it designed? Buckle your seat belts! 



Power to the People 

The VW of IBM PC word processors has just been souped up. Volkswriter 4, the 
midrange product in \tolkswriter's complete line of low-cost word processing 
packages, has been upgraded, adding more features and ease of use than ever 
before. 

The new release of Volkswriter 4 offers full integration of Reference Soft- 
ware's Grammatik IV, a 31 0,000-word thesaurus, a 170,000-word spelling check- 
er, footnotes, endnotes, page preview, macros, and autorecognition for five 
common file formats. Optional add-ons include multilingual thesauruses and dic- 
tionaries for spelling and autohyphenation, specialized dictionaries, LAN installa- 
tion, and Vblkswriter's file-conversion package, Volks Word for Word, 
Volkswriter 4 release 2.0 retails for $249. 

The complete Vblkswriter line offers Increasingly sophisticated products, 
from the entry-level Volkswriter 2 program to the Volkswriter 6 package with ad- 
vanced publishing capabilities. The company's unique upgrade policy offers an 
easy ahd economical way to move between packages for considerably less than 
the cost of a new program. High-power, lower cost apps represent a new trend. 
For more information, contact Vblkswriter, One Lower Ragsdale Drive, Building 
2, Suite 100, Monterey, California 93940; (408) 648-3000. 



Superpriced SuperCalc 

Computer Associates has slashed a whopping 70 percent off the suggested retail 
price of SuperCaicS, the company's popular spreadsheet program. It doesn't take 
a spreadsheet to see this represents a major cost savings for consumers. The re- 
sult is that SuperCalcd's original suggested retail price of $495 is now $149. 

Sanjay Kumar, CA's senior vice president of planning, said, "We are a client- 
and market-driven company Users tell us they want the latest spreadsheet tech- 
nology, but they need it at a price they can afford and in an application that will run 
on all of their MS-DOS based PCs. That's exactly what we're giving them." 

SuperCalcS provides advanced spreadsheet technology, including Lotus 
1-2-3 compatibility, spreadsheet linking, three-dimensional spreadsheet capabili- 
ties, presentation-quality graphics and output, and network support. The compa- 
ny also claims SuperCalc5 is the only spreadsheet offering this level of 
functionality that can run across the complete range of PCs, from 8086 to 80486 
machines. For more information, contact Computer Associates, 1240 McKay 
Drive, San Jose, California 95131. 



Enormous 
Plot! 

For those who think regular tabfetop 
or freestanding plotters are just too 
darned small, Data Mate has released 
the Michelangelo Paint Jet System. 
With it, you can decorate the side of a 
van, a wall, or a giant canvas (up to 
5.38 feet square). The source can be 
any graphic scanned into a computer 
with a Sharp JX-300 or compatible 
scanner. As you might imagine, the 
equipment doesn't come cheap. To 
begin with, you will need to have an 
IBM PS/2 computer, a color scanner, 
and an air compressor (Michelangelo 
is sort of a robotized airbnjsh artist). 
Once you have assembled this basic 
support equipment, Michelangelo itself 
costs $60,000 f .o.b. Japan (or $53,000 
each for two or more). The paint (you 
will need to have yellow, magenta, and 
cyan installed) costs $15 per bottle, 
and you will use about a bottle of paint 
for each painting. Still, Data Mate in- 
sists that Michelangelo quickly pays 
for itself if you create four paintings a 
day at a charge of $600 per painting 
(each painting takes Michelangelo 
about four hours). The net cost per 
day is around $60, so you would make 
a net profit of around $2,340 per day 
(that's $70,200 per month). Or so they 
say. 

The literature states that Michel- 
angelo can paint on paper, glass, plas- 
tic, cloth, wood, or enamel (as used on 
automotive bodies). The unit looks like 
a vertical version of a flatbed plotter, 
about six feet high and a little wider 
than it is talL The painter runs on a 
track mounted on a horizontal bar 
which Is elevated on twin vertical bars. 
It breaks down into separate sections 
and weighs only 287 pounds (plus 40 
pounds for the controller), making it 
easy to transport from one job to the 
next. It uses acrylic paint that is odor- 
less and nontoxic but weathers well. 

Although the price of the equips 
ment may seem high at first glance. It 
compares well with the cost of silk 
screens. Silk screens are many times 
more expensive than Michelangelo, 
and they are not as flexible. 

For more information, contact 
Data Mate, New Taro Building, 2-2-12, 
Fujimi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan. i> 



10 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 











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WITH THE PROS! 

BesfdGs great graphics, excellent displays and perfect sounds, 
TIE BREAK TENNIS offers more, a lot more! Realism, thrill, 
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^) 
Compete in all major tournaments including: WIMBLEDON, US OPEN, THE DAVIS 
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surface, racket, and computer opponents with individual profiles. Use a variety of 
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and many more! Play singles or doubles alone or with a partner, or compete with 
up to 16 players (human or computer) in tournaments. You can even keep track of 
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With its breath-taking animation, amazing realistic speech and sound effects in TV- 
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Available for: IBM PC, PS-2, PS-1, 1007o compatibles and Tandy computers. Also 
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NEWS & NOTES 



Windowed PageMaker 

PageMaker iust opened up for Windows. PageMaker version 4.0 for Microsoft 
Windows 3.0 now boasts more than 75 new features, including a buiit-in word 
processor, extensive support for long documents, sophisticated text handling, 
and professional typographic controls. Capabilities previously available only in 
PageMaker 4.0 for the Macintosh have been included in this PC powerhouse, in- 
cluding memory management, networking options, and color capabilities. All the 
program's features have now been designed to take specific advantage of the 
Windows 3.0 environment. 

With this new version, users can turn layout and text windows into easily ac- 
cessible icons. Dynamic data exchange (DDE) links with Microsoft Excei 3.0 are 
also provided. The program's new high-speed Story Editor and built-in word pro- 
cessor allow you to do most of your work without leaving PageMaker, Advanced 
features such as search-and-replace for text and style attributes and add-on 
spelling checkers for 12 languages, as well as for legal, medical, and scientific 
terminology, make it easy to use the new PageMaker's built-in word processor 
for virtually any document you might want to create. 

For a limited time only, Aldus PageMaker 4.0 also includes a free copy of 
Adobe Type Manager, a $99 value (not available In 360K media). Aldus Page- 
Maker 4,0 for Windows Is available in the U.S. for a retail price of $795. For more 
information, contact Aldus, Customer Relations, 41 1 First Avenue South, Seattie, 
Washington 98104. 



Two Batteries, No Waiting 

Laptops are definitely the computers of the future. All sales figures indicate these 
little wonders are outselling their desktop competitors and there appears to be 
no end to their accelerating sales. But laptops aren't worth a whole lot without 
their batteries. That's why Epson's new 386SX notebook PC, the NB3s, comes 
equipped with not one but two 8-ounce nl-cad batteries, each with an estimated 
life of 1 to 1 .5 hours per charge under typical usage conditions. 

Even better, the 16-MHz machine weighs just 5.8 pounds (with battery) and 
comes with a slip case that accommodates the unit and the exti-a battery. It's just 
about everything you need In a high-powered portable PC, for a suggested retail 
price of $3,999. For additional Information, contact Epson America, 2780 Lomtta 
Boulevard, Torrance, California 90505; (800) 922-891 1 . 



Expensive Software 

The Software Publishers Association (SR^) has revealed that a settiement of 
$300,000, the largest ever reached in such a case, has been obtained in a soft- 
ware copyright Infringement suit against Davy McKee Corporation, a Chicago- 
based construction engineering firm. 

Using Information supplied by a former Davy McKee employee, SFA filed a 
lawsuit on November 16, 1990, alleging that software copyrighted by Lotus, Soft- 
ware Publishing, and WordPerfect was routinely copied by the company In viola- 
tion of the Copyright Act. After a surprise visit and an SFV^-supervised audit of 
the software In use on all personal computers located at the firm, tine company 
agreed to a settiement which, In addition to the cash, includes annual software 
audits for the next two years. 

The company apparentiy thought it was saving money by using unautiio- 
rized copies of popular software on Its computers. Of course, the cxDst was even- 
tually much higher than was most likely anticipated at the time. Software piracy 
takes all forms, and SR^ has been a dedicated force in education and enforce- 
ment geared to bringing it to a halt. 



Affordable 486? 

Headed into the fast lane, Intel has just 
created a new, less expensive version 
of the 486 microprocessor. Called tiie 
486SX, tiie new chip will sell to com- 
puter manufacturers for roughly half 
tiie cost of a full-blown 80486. The 
new 486SX njns at a speed of 20 
MHz, which is about 20 percent slower 
than Intel's slowest 80486 CPU and 
about 35 percent faster than Intel's 
fastest 80386 chip combined with 
cache memory chips. 

According to a report pubished in 
the Wall Street Journal, the 486SX is 
basically tiie same as the standard 
486 chip, but Intel has disabled drcurts 
in the floating-point chip unit. The float- 
ing-point chip unit normally speeds up 
math calculations. 

Intel says tiiat for an additional 
$800 it will offer manufacturers anoth- 
er plug-in chip that will restore the co- 
processor capability and will increase 
the speed of the 486SX to that of a 
standard 486 chip. The main advan- 
tage of a 486SX over Intel's 386 chip Is 
the 486's built-in cache memory. 

IBM has already begun shipping 
several new systems that use Intel's 
486SX microprocessor. The new sys- 
tems come standard with 4MB of 
memory, expandable to 64MB on the 
system board. All systems include a 
32-bft SCSI busmaster that includes 
51 2K cache for data input and output. 

The desktop models are config- 
ured witii either an 80MB SCSI hard 
disk (Model 90 XP 486 SX-0G5) or a 
160MB SCSI hard disk (Model 90 XP 
486 SX-0G9) and with 80-, 160-, 320-, 
and 400MB SCSI hard disks as op- 
tions. Suggested retail prices range 
from $8,345 to $8,945. 

Also available (in July) are two 
new Model 96s featuring the same 
amount of memory as the Model 90s, 
a 160MB or 400MB hard disk (with the 
same list of optional hard disks as the 
Model 90s), price ranging from $9,995 
to $12,695. In addition to the differ- 
ence in hard disk size, the Model 90 
machines are desktop units, while the 
Model 95s are designed to stand on 
the floor beside a desk. 

"News & Notes ' Is by Alan R. Bechtold, 
editor of tnfo-Mat Magazine^ an electronic 
news weekly from BBS Press Service, m 



12 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



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RICHARD 



L E 



N E C K E R 



Since summer months are the 
biggest travel months, weVe 
collected three terrific programs 
tai]geied to the laptop audience. If 
you don't have a laptop, though, don*t 
worry. The same principles that apply 
to laptop-specific software usually ap- 
ply to desktop systems as well 

You may be running a floppy- 
only system, or your available hard 
drive space may be in short supply. If 
youVe in either situation, hang on; 
these programs are for you, too. 

First, there's Simply Wriie, a text 
editor for writing letters, outlines, and 
documents. PROspector is a prospect 
tracker for salespeople who need to 
stay organized. And when you get 
back to the office, Filesync will copy 
over and update only the files you've 
worked on while you were away. 

Why should you order our Share- 
Pak disks? Because they're always 
packed with the best programs, hand- 
picked from hundreds of submissions. 
The cost of downloading these pro- 
grams from an online service alone is 
worth many times the cost of the disk. 
And we spend many hours screening 
them to select the very best programs 
so you don't have to. There's one 
more fmportant incentive: We guar- 
antee our SharePak, If for any reason 
you're not happy, just send it back 
with your reason, and we'll refund 
your money. A subscription can save 
you even more money. You can get 
12 disks for $59,95, a 37-percent sav- 
ings over individual disk purchases. 

SlmplyWrlte 

This ASCII text editor does more than 
just edit ASCII text. It has the full list 
of features you would expect: search 
and replace; insert and overwrite tog- 
gle; block operations like cut, copy, 
and paste; keystroke macros; word- 
wrap and autoindent; margin and lab 
operations; complete print-formatting 
commands like bold, italic, com- 
pressed, and letter quality; and much 
more. 

There are some surprises, too. 
You can edit the cursor size, set the 
keyboard speed, edit documents with 



up to 1000 columns, and use a built-in 
pop-up calculator and calendar. These 
features aren't even found in many 
commercial word processors. 

The keypresses I needed were 
easy to learn — thanks mainly to the 
great online help that's merely a key- 
stroke away. Simply Write ^zs easier 
to learn than most text editors I've 
used, and the best part is that the re- 
quired disk space was 273K — small 
enough to put on a single floppy and 
have plenty of room for documents. 




For laptop owners, SimplyWrite 
is the answer to the fight for programs 
small enough to fit on a single floppy. 
If you need to economize on disk 
space, this program is also for you. 
Not only is it a quality piece of soft- 
ware, it's small and won't hog your 
system's resources. 

PROspector 

You're on the road or in the air, and 
you need to refresh your memory. In- 
stead of fumbling through legal pads, 
take out your laptop computer and 
run PROspector 1 .0. It'll give you a 
complete picture so you can mentally 
prepare for upcoming events. 



PROspector is pretty easy to use; 
if you're familiar with similar pro- 
grams, you shouldn't have any trouble 
learning how to use it. Entering data is 
simple. The program gives you a box, 
and all you have to do is type in the 
information and press Enter. It does 
all the worrying about updating your 
disk files and keeping track of them. 

You can sort the entries just 
about any way you want, and you can 
set the search criteria for a wide range 
of uses. The search routines can find 
entries in any of the fields. That way 
you can search for all references to 
Bill, for example, and then turn 
around and find all the phone num- 
bers with a 9 1 9 area code. 

For such a powerful program, 
you won't have to give up much disk 
space. The directory I put PROspector 
in contained a total of 359K of files, 
including several test-data files. That 
leaves plenty of room on a 3y2-inch 
disk for your fdes. 

If you want to keep track of 
appointments, clients, and contacts, 
this program is a must. It will give 
you a needed edge in your business, 
and it won't tax your computer's 
resources too heavily. 

Filesync 

Once you're back in the office, you'll 
want to copy your files back to your 
desktop system, but it isn't always a 
good idea to copy everything. That's 
why Filesync is so handy. It com- 
pares the dates and times of files and 
makes sure you're left with the latest 
updates. 

The program is simple to use. 
Just type in the source and destination 
directories, and let it go to work. This 
handy utility can save you time and 
aggravation, and possibly prevent 
mistakes that will wipe out your latest 
file changes. 

When using a laptop, you have to 
find ways to get the most computing 
power out of the least amount of disk 
space and memory. These programs do 
that and provide some of the most use- 
ful tools to use on the road — and 
they're usefiil for desktop systems, too. El 



14 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




With COMPUTE'S SharePak, You'll 



Share in the Savihgs! 



SAVE TIME— we carefully select and test all 
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SAVE MONEY— each disk includes two to five 
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COMPUTE'S SharePak disk contains the best of 
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$5.95 for 5V4-inch disk 

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For even more savings, 
Subscribe to SharePak and receive 
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For a limited time, you can subscribe to CX)MPUTE's Share- 
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Disks available only for IBM PC and compatibles. Offer good while supplies last 



For Singfe Disks 

YESI I want to stiare in the savings. Send me the July 1 991 issue of 
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Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents of NC and NY. please add appropriate sales tax for 

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Total Enclosed _ 



. ZIP/Postal Code _ 



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DBACK 



LETTERS FROM OUR READERS 



The IDEs D^marchB 

You could help your readers avert a 
fatal mistake by running another para- 
graph about low-level formats ("Intro- 
DOS," April] 991). 

Before you do anything to your 
hard drive, you should find out what 
kind it is, IDE drives are low-level for- 
matted at the factory and should not 
be low-level formatted again. 

S. M. RUSSELL 
W. PEABODY, MA 

Reader Russell makes an excellent 

point, and his letter goes on to quote 
his user manual's warning against 
low-level formatting of IDE (Integrat- 
ed Drive Electronics) drives, 

April 's ' IntroDOS" column failed 
to note the differences between IDE 
and other drive types. During the fac- 
tory^ low-level format, certain infor- 
mation is written to IDE drives, and 
subsequent low-level formatting could 
destroy that information, rendering 
the drive inoperable. 

The column 's intended message 
was that you should not be afraid to 
use low-level formatting utilities if ap- 
propriate for your drive. If such utili- 
ties came packaged with your drive, 
you can be pretty sure you won't harm 
your drive through their use. 

No hardware procedure, however, 
should be attempted without checking 
the user manual for information about 
how that procedure might affect your 
specific computer system. 



Missing Link 

I read with interest the telecommuni- 
cations-related articles in your Febru- 
ary 1991 issue but was dismayed to 
observe the almost total lack of recog- 
nition of and discussion about Ameri- 
can People/Link (Plink). It has been 
online since December 1984 and has 
tens of thousands of satisfied users. 
Plink offers a wide variety of services 
to its subscribers, not the least of 
which are its Amiga support clubs, 
which I run. To ignore People/Link is 
a disservice to your readers. 

HARV L.kSER 
TORRANCE, CA 



People interested in learning more 
about People/Link can call (800) 524- 
0100 (voice) or (800) 826-8855 (mo- 
dem) or write to American People/ 
Link, 165 North Canal Street, Suite 
950, Chicago, Illinois 60605. 

Worth More Than 
1 000 Words 

I understand that a scanner can trans- 
fer images from a printed page to a 
computer for desktop publishing ap- 
plications, but why is it necessar}' to 
use another device to accomplish the 
same for printed words? What's the 
difference to the computer between an 
illustrated page and one filled with 
text? 

HSIN TU 

N. HOLLYWOOD. CA 

7b start with your second question, 
computers store text as a series of dis- 
crete characters. Each character occu- 
pies one byte of storage space. 
Programs that display these charac- 
ters— word processors, for example- 
have a series of rules to follow in dis- 
playing this text so that it appears or- 
ganized when displayed. 

With a graphic, the entire illustra- 
tion is considered one element. The 
image is stored using a code that de- 
scribes how the pixels (picture ele- 
ments) on the screen are to be lighted 
when the graphic is displayed. 

When an image is scanned, the 
scanner bounces its light off of the im- 
age, measures the reflection, and re- 
cords the information about the 
lightness and darkness of the image. 
To a scanner, a page of text is no dif- 
ferent from a picture of a sailboat — 
both represent varying amounts of re- 
flected light. 

A scanned image fits nicely into a 
paint program, which is essentially a 
pixel- man ipulation program. 

To turn scanned text into editable 
text, additional software is needed. 
This software, called OCR or Optical 
Character Recognition software, ex- 
amines the scanned image (a graphic) 
for character patterns that it can 
match with patterns in its character li- 



16 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



connpuTE 

EDJTORIAL 
Edilor in Chief Peter Scisco 
Art Director RotHn C, Case 
Executive Editor Clifton Karnes 
Senior Editor Emeritus Kertfi Ferrell 

Managing Editor David Hensley Jr. 
Features Editor Robert Bfxby 
Associate Editor David English 

Editor, Gazette Tom Netsel 
Associate Editor, 
Amiga Resource Denny Atkin 
Reviews Editor Mike Hudnall 
Assistant Editors Jill Champton 
David Sears 
Copy Editors Karen Huffman 

Susan Thompson 
Editorial Assistant Kandi Sykes 
ART 
Assistant Art Director Kenr>etii A, Hardy 
Designer Jo Boykin 
Typesetter Terry Cash 

PRODUCTION 
Production Manager De Potter 

Traffic Manager Bartjara A. Williams 
PROGRAMMiNG 
Programming Manager Richard C, Leinecker 
Programmers Bruce Bowden 
Steve Draper 
Troy Tucker 

ADMINISTRATION 

President Kathy Keeton 
Executive Vice President, 

Operations Will tarn Tynan 

Office Manager Sybil Age© 
Sr. Administrative Assistant, 

Customer Service Julia Fleming 

Administrative Assistant Efreda Chavis 

fleceptionist Cynthia Giles 

ADVERTISING 

Vice President, 
Associate PubJisher Bernard J. Theobald Jr. 
(212) 496-6100 
Vice President, 
Sales Development James B. Marti&e 
Marketing Manager Caroline H anion 
(919) 275-9809 

AOVEHTISING SALES OFFICES 
East Coa»(: Full -Page And Standafd Display Adi— Bernard J 
TheobakJ Jf , Chns Coe^ho, COMPUTE Pubicatwns intematiooal Ltd., 
1965 Broadway, Mew YofK, NY T0023: (212} <i96-61M New England- 
Jack Garland, Garlar^d Associates, Irx;,. 10 Industrial Park Rd , Hinohafn 
MA 02043; (617) 749-5852 Eaat Coast and Midwesi: FractiOital and 
Product Marl Ads — Carotins Han (on. Produd Mart Manager COM- 
PUTE Pubtications International Hd . 324 W. Wendovar five.. Surte 200. 
Gr^nstxxo. NC 2740S; (919) 275-9S09- Southeastern Accts. Mgrj 
Fun-Page, Standard Display, and Mail-Order Ads— Harr^t Rooefs, 
1725 K St NW Suite 903, Washington, DC 20006; (202} 72B-0320. 
Rorida— J M Remer Assccates, 3300 NtE I92nd S^ Surte 192 
Aventura. FL 33180; (305) 933-1467, (305) 933-8302 (FAX} Midwest^ 
Full -Page and Stanttard Display Ads— Starr Lane, Naiional Accounts 
Manager; 1025 Cresoeni Blvd , Glen Eliyn. IL 60137: (708) 79O-0171 
Mid- Southwell —Joy Burteson. Brertda CcxJiran, Tamara Cramef , Carci 
On; Carol Orr 4 Co. 3500 Mapte. Surle 500. Datias. TX 75219; (214) 
521-6116 West Coast Education/ Entertainment— Jerry Thorripscn. 
Jule^ E Thompson Co , 1290 Ho^^rd A^'e,, Suite 303. Buriingame. CA 
94010: (415) 348-8222 Western Accts, Mgr: Productivity/Home Of- 
fice — Ian Ltngwood. 6728 Eton Aue . Canoaa Park. CA 91303; (818) 
992-4777 West Coast: Fractional Mait-Order, Shareware, and Prod- 
uct Mart Arfs— LuciSle Denms, Jules E. Thompson Co,, 1290 Howard 
^e. Surte 303, Buriingame, CA 94010; (707) 451-8209 U.K & Eu- 
rope— Beverly Wardale, 14 bsgar Terr , London W14, England; 011- 
441-602-3298 Japan— fntergroup Communcations. Lid ; JIfO Semba. 
Prestdent. 3F Tiger e;dg 5-22 Shibakoen, 3-CrK>mo. Mrnato4(u, Tokyo 
105. Japan; 03-434-2607. Classified Ads— Sharon Stemkemper, COM- 
PUTE PuWications Inter naborai Ltd , 1965 Broadway. New York. NY 
10023: (212) 724-0911, 

THE COnpOHATION 

Bob Gocoone (chairman^ 

Katny Keeton (vice-ctyairman) 

David J, Myef&on (chief apefaung otticef} 

Anttiorty J Gucctone (sccrstsryireasufef} 

Wiliam F. Mariieb (pros^d^nt mBrketing & advertising sa!es) 

Jotin Evans (pmsidGni. iot&ign ediUons) 

Patrick J Gavm (vics president, chief tmartcial aftiCBr} 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING 

Sir VP/Corp. Dir . New Business Devehpfnent.: Beverly Wardale: 

VP/Dir.. Group Advertising Ssj'es Nancy KesteflOaum; Sr. VP/Souiharn 

and Midwest Advertising Dif. Pet&- Gc*dsmrth. Otfices. New Yoric 1 965 

Broadway, New Yort, NY 10023-5965, Tel. (212) 496-6100. Telest 237128, 

Midw&st: 333 N Michigan f^e.. Suite 1810, Chicago, IL 60601, Tet. (312) 

346-9393 Soum: 1725 K St NW. Suite 903, Washington, DC 20O06, TeL 

(202) 728-0320 W&sS Coast 6728 Eion ^e.. Canoga ParX, CA 91303. 

Tel (818) 992-4777 UK and Europe: 14 LJsgar Terraoe. London W14, 

England, Tel 01-028-3336 Japan intergroup Jiro Semba. Telex 

J25459IGLTYO. Fax 434-5970 Korea Kaya Advlsng . Inc,, Flm 402 

Kunshtn Annex B/0 251-1, Dohwa Dong, Mapo-Ku. Seoul. Kofea (121). 

Te<. Tia-eaoe, Telex K32l44Kayaaa 

ADMINISTRATION 
VP /finance, CFO: Patrick J. Gavin: Sr. VP/ Administrative Services: Jen 
Winston; Sr VP/Arr & Graphics Frank Oevino: VP/Ne\AfSStand Circula- 
tion: Marcia Orovnz; VP /Director of Ne« Magazine DeveSopment: Rona 
Cherry, VP Director Sales Promotions Beverly Greiper. VP Production: 
Hal Haipner, Dir Nev/sstano Cifcutation: Paul Ro^nicV; Dir. f^ewsstaryd 
Circulation D^stnCujlion: Charios Anderson, Jr ; Dif Sbtsscription Circuts- 
tion: Mflfcia Schuir?; Difectof of Roiearch Robert Ratlner; Adverrisirtg 
Production Director. Charlene Smith. Advertising Production Tr&ftic 
Mgr.. Mark Wilhams; Traffic Dir : William Harbutl; Production hAgr.: Tom 
Etinson; Asst. Production Mgr. Nancy Hice; Foreign Editions Mgr.: Mi- 
chael Slevens, £jrec Asst. to Sob Guccione: Diane O'Comefli: fjroc. 
Asst to David J Myefsor.' Ten Pisant; Spectal Asst to Bob Gt/ccione: 
Jane HOfniiSh 




FEEDBACK 



brary. When it finds a match, it stores 
the matched character in a file as a 
discrete letter. 

Optical Character Recognition 
presents many challenges that are 
slowly being overcome. One problem is 
that the same letter — a, for example — 
can take different forms depending on 
the typeface. We've trained our brains 
to recognize and adjust for these differ- 
ences, but programming such nuances 
into OCR software is a mammoth task 
that requires great amounts of 
memory. 

Newspapers were among the first 
businesses to use OCR software regu- 
larly. As recently as ten years ago, an 
OCR scanner was larger than today's 
full-featured office copier. Writers 
typed their stories on special paper 
using special type balls on their IBM 
Selectric typewriters. Their letters had 
to line up properly and fall within cer- 
tain margins. 

The finished pages were then fed 
into the scanner, which took several 
minutes to digest a typical story. The 
machine beeped constantly, asking for 
help when it couldn't quite make out a 
character. 

Today's OCR software is improv- 
ing, but it still isn 't perfect, and ex^en 
99-percent accuracy isn 't good enough. 
Imagine trying to scan this magazine 
page, which holds approximately 6000 
characters, using OCR software. Even 
if your software correctly identifies 99 
percent of the characters, it 's still going 
to stop and ask you for help 60 times. 



TVoubling Memories 

I recently expanded the memory in 
my system from 5 12K to 1MB. My 
first use for the memory was to install 
a RAM disk for use with my Money 
Counts files, but I'd also like to use 
the extra memory when I run Quattro 
Pro. How can I delete the RAM disk 
when I'm through with it? 

ROBERT M. MERRITT 
BLUE SPRINGS, MO 

Little in computing causes as much 
frustration as the extended memory 
between 640K and 1MB. It 's a crime 
to let that memory go unused, but it 's 
difficuh to use it effectively. 

Any device you install through 
your CONFIG.SYS, such as RAM- 
DISK.SYS or VDISK.SYS, is with you 
until you rewrite CONFIG.SYS and 



reboot. Switching a standard DOS- 
supplied RAM disk on and off isn *t 
possible. However, you can buy com- 
mercial RAM-disk programs that can 
be tetnporarily disabled or permanent- 
ly removed. 

Although a RAM disk can be ex- 
tremely valuable on a floppy-disk- 
based system with no hard disk, it 
tends to be a bother when you have a 
hard disk. You do save a little time 
reading and writing files with a RAM 
disk, but you also have to spend time 
copying the files from the hard disk to 
the RAM disk and back again. In ad- 
dition, you run the risk of losing up- 
dated data if the power fails before 
your RAM disk files are saved on the 
hard disk. 

Perhaps the extra memory could 
be better used by installing a disk 
cache or by using it as a swap area for 
certain resident programs. 

A cache speeds disk access by 
keeping frequently read disk sectors in 
memory^ and by trynng to anticipate 
which sector you 'II need next. When 
the cache is successful, data is fetched 
directly from memory rather than 
from the disk drive, resulting in a fast- 
er data transfer 

Swapping is a technique used by 
many resident utilities to minimize 
their footprint when not in use. A small 
portion of the utility stays in memory 
at all times. When you press that pro- 
gram 's hot key, the resident portion 
loads the "swapfile. " If the swapfile is 
on disk, this process takes a few sec- 
onds, but if the swapfile is in extended 
memory, it's almost instantaneous. 

Memory prices are currently as 
low as they've been in years. Why not 
add three or four more megabytes? 
Then you 'II face some really tough de- 
cisions about how to use your memory^ 



Playing the Slots 

All the slots in my system are full but 
I don't want to buy a larger unit at 
this time. Is there any way to add an 
expansion box with more slots? 

LEE COTE 
FOLSOM, CA 

A computing truism seems to be that 
expansion slots fill faster than gullies 
in a thundershower. Look at comput- 
ing's recent history, and you 'II see ex- 
pansion everywhere. 

My first computer, for example. 



held 64 K of memory. Friends who 
used systems ofI6K and 32K thought I 
was nuts. Today, I can't run the soft- 
ware I want with 3 megabytes of RAM. 
As software attd hardware advance to 
new levels, there are many more cards 
I can plug into my system— modems, 
mice, scanners, MIDI. 

As time passes, demand on your 
system 's resources will only increase. 
When you shop for a computer, buy as 
much expansion capability as you can 
afford: then spend the next year or two 
filling it up. 

Many corporations have come to 
accept the inevitability of this cycle 
and are now budgeting to replace their 
computer systems every three years in 
order to stay abreast of technology. 

If you've run out of slots, you may 
be able to consolidate the expansion 
boards you have to gain some room, 
but there doesn 't seem to be any practi- 
cal external expansion system for to- 
day's PCs. 

Consolidation can be achieved by 
using multifunction boards to replace 
dedicated cards. Many memory 
boards, for example, can accommo- 
date serial and parallel ports in addi- 
tion to RAM chips. 

If you have an unused serial port, 
you could free a slot by switching from 
an internal to an external modem or 
by trading a bus mouse for a serial 
mouse. 

If consolidation is impossible and 
you need more power, it 's time to shop 
for a system you can live with for an- 
other two or three years. If you have no 
need for two computers, you may be 
able to sell the old system through a 
classified ad in a community ne\vs- 
paper. Or consider giving the less pow- 
erful computer to a son or daughter for 
schoolwork. Then you can start think- 
ing about setting up a household 
LAN-^but there goes one more pre- 
cious expansion slot. B 

Readers whose letters appear in "Feed- 
back" will receive a free COMPUTE's 
PC clock radio while supplies last. Do 
you have a question about hardware or 
software? Or have you discovered some- 
thing that could help other PC users? If 
so, we want to hear from you. Write to 
COMPUTE'S Feedback, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408, We re- 
gret that we cannot provide personal 
replies to tech n ical questions, B 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE M 



^ 





HEALTH & COMPUTERS 



IS a computer your best friend and 
personal trainer? Or is it a poten- 
tially dangerous appliance? Can 
the PC help the disabled lead 
more normal lives? Or is it a power- 
ful tool in the hands of medical pro- 
fessionals? The answers are Yes, Yes, 
Yes, and Yes, 

A personal computer much like 
the machine sitting on your desk can 
be everything from a coach to a diag- 
nostician. And it helps enable the 
disabled. 

On the downside, your comput- 
er's monitor showers you with ex- 
tremely low frequency (ELF) and very 
low frequency (VLF) radiation every 
minute you use it And, unless your 
workspace is ergonomically designed, 
your keyboard may be dooming you 
to chronic, painful repetitive strain 
injury. 

Your PC has its own health to 
worry about, too. Viruses can strike at 
a PC's heart and soul^ — its hard disk 
drive — and cripple the machine as ef- 
fectively as a flu virus lays you low. 

As they say, if you have your 
health, you have everything. The PC, 
M^ household tool of the 1990s, can 
help to ensure that you keep your 
health — your everything. 




Eat Right, Lose Weight, Stay Fit 

Your PC can't do it alone. Before it 
can help you get a grip on your diet, 
before it can tell you how healthy (or 
unhealthy) certain foods are, and 
before it can motivate you to exercise, 
you have to give it the right software. 
Several comprehensive nutrition 
and diet programs let you record what 
you've eaten and see exactly what nu- 
trients make up each food. They'll 
even note your physical activities. 
Most are flexible enough to let you en- 
ter new foods and play what-if games 
with your diet and exercise. Notewor- 
thy software in that category ranges 
from the graphical DINE Windows to 
the more traditional Food Processor 
II, Some products treat your diet as 
the key to good health, monitoring 
not entirely for the sake of weight loss, 
but for nutritional content. Parsons 
Technology's Diet Analyst checks 
your food intake for deficiencies in vi- 
tamins and other nutrients. Diet Ana- 
lyst can also help you track caloric 
intake, but its principal claim is health 
maintenance rather than weight loss. 
If your diet is intended to maintain 
weight or is a reduced-sodium, -sugar, 
or -cholesterol diet, Diet Wise/Energy 
Wise from Nutritional Data Re- 



GREGG KEIZER 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 19 



sources not only assists you via your 
computer bui also provides loll-free 
access to a registered dietitian. 

Your computer can't nag you to 
get up in the morning for your daily 
run or swim^ but it can motivate you 
by tracking your progress. A small 
amount of software is available to 
help you develop daily exercise plans, 
while logging your workouts. Fitness 
Profile, an expensive package, scores 
your current runess from several tests, 
many of which you can do at home or 
at the local club. Personal Fitness 
Planner designs a daily activity and 
eating plan and then lets you record 
activities to show how you're doing. 

Software can also turn your PC 
into a rudimentary self-diagnostic 
tool. Packages like Family Medical 
Adviser and Home Doctor consider 
symptoms, ask questions, and let you 
narrow down the possibilities for per- 
sonal and family illnesses. They can't 
replace a doctor's expertise, of course 
(expert system software isn't at that 
stage yet), but they can help answer 
questions about simple ailments. 

If you go to the trouble to look 
for it, you can find specialized soft- 
ware on almost any health topic imag- 
inable. Want information about 
AIDS? Understanding AIDS takes you 
through an interactive lesson on the 
disease, from its history to its symp- 
toms and prevention. Birds 'NBees 
for 7-12 Year Olds explains sex and 
reproduction in a clear and simple 
fashion to youngsters, and it even lets 
you customize the content as well as 
direct it for your child's age and sex. 

The Doctor Is Always In 

Transform your PC into a fascinating 
medical- and health-information ter- 
minal with a phone line, a modem, 
and access to one of the online ser- 
vices. Connect to CompuServe, for in- 
stance, and you can peruse medical 
journals, order prescription drugs, and 
even chat with others about anything 
from exercise to cancer treatments. 

Although other online services 
offer health information, none of 
them match CompuServe. If you call 
on Health Database Plus, for instance, 
you can retrieve complete articles 
from general-interest publications like 
American Health, Hippocrates, Run- 
ner's World, and Psychology^ Today ^ If 
you want to keep up with breaking 
medical news, you can pull down 
short summaries of articles from pres- 
tigious journals such as the New' Eng- 
land Journal of Medicine, the British 
MedicalJournal, and \\it American 
Journal of Medicine. 

Want specific information about 
the medication your family doctor has 
prescribed? Then go to HealthNet, an 
online medical reference library. You 

20 COMPUTE JULY 1 



The Dieter's Edge 



Nobody tikes counting calories, yet keeping 
track of your food intake ts an integral part 
of any sound personal health plan. It's easy 
to lose sight of the fact that a diet isn't a 
quick means for taking off unwanted 
weight. A good diet balances fitness and 
nutrition into a pattern you can maintain for 
life. 

That's where a program like 7/je Diet- 
er's Edge comes in. This isn't just a simple 
calorie counter; it's a comprehensive sys- 
tem of measuring personal metabolism 
rales, eating habits, and exercise regimens. 
The data you enter is cast against back- 
ground information compiled from the Unit- 
ed States Department of Agriculture's 
nutritional databases. The results are dis- 
played in graphs and charts that bring a 
picture of your health into clear focus and 
help you maintain weight-loss and exercise 
programs. 

The Dieter's Edge is designed for 
home use, and Its sophisticated techniques 
are particularly suited for those people 
working with a physician, coach, or dieti- 
tian. The program tracks the protein, fat, 
carbohydrate, mineral, and vitamin levels of 
the foods you eat daily, it also tracks your 
energy expenditures from such common 
exercises as bicycling, walking, mnning, 
swimming, and tennis. More than that, how- 



can consult it at any hoor of any day 
to learn about symptoms, diseases 
and disorders, home health care, 
drugs, and more. If your child's doctor 
prescribes .Amoxil to fight an infec- 
tion, for instance, you can quickly 
find out how it works, what it's best 
used for, its side effects, and even its 
wholesale cost, 

CompuServe also includes Court 
Pharmacy, an online drugstore that 
fills prescriptions. The doctor's pre- 
scription must be mailed to the phar- 
macy, so it's best for maintenance 
medications, not drugs you need im- 
mediately. Court is an interesting and 
price-competitive alternative to your 
local pharmacy and may be especially 
attractive to the homebound or those 
living in remote rural areas. 

But perhaps the most impressive 
way online services like CompuServe 
help your health is through their fo- 
rums. Forums gather together people 
with common interests, allowing 
them to talk electronically about their 
illnesses, share their experiences, and 
offer support and advice. 

Your PC is no replacement for an 
intelligent, caring medical profession- 
al, but it can certainly put a wealth of 
information at your fingertips. 

PCs for the Pros 

Personal computers do more for 
health care than just make out the 
bills and keep track of a doctor's 
schedule. Although they may be ever 

9 9 1 



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How does your diet stack up? 

ever, you can define home recipes and spe- 
cial exercises with customizing options. 
It's difficult to gain mastery over the 
program's complex and comprehensive 
data because the interface isn't as intuitive 
as it needs to be. Fortunately, the manual 
provides a clear guide through the basic 
processes, and the program itself comes 
with some sample data you can experiment 
with. Mastering The Dieter's Edge takes 
time. But if you're serious about your nutri- 
tion and you need some help staying with 
your program, this software turns your 
computer into a personal health coach. 
Best of all, you never have to listen to 
Richard Simmons. 

—PETER scisco 



present in the office, handling the 
same sorts of chores as in any busi- 
ness, PCs may actually be making a 
bigger and better contribution to 
medicine long before an M.D. goes 
into practice. 

At the Louisiana State University 
Medical Center in Shreveport, Louisi- 
ana, PCs are a prominent part of the 
library. Linked in networks, they con- 
nect to any number of online medical 
databases, including the publication 
listing of MedLine. Medical students 
can scan recent journals, pulling down 
abstracts of articles from the screen. 
Interlibrary and interregional loan 
programs ensure that hardcopy gets to 
students quickly. Teaching faculty 
and physicians link up from the PCs 
in their offices via the network or 
modems. 

Off to the side, PCs drive an in- 
teractive videodisc lab. IBM PS/2s 
control laser disc players to simulate 
medical emergencies and put prospec- 
tive doctors under pressure. At one 
station, the videodisc shows a shotgun 
victim arriving at a hospitars ER. By 
pressing a touchscreen on the PC's 
monitor, users call for examinations, 
order medications and fluids for the 
patient, and review vital statistics like 
blood pressure, respiration, and heart- 
beat. Choices determine the wounded 
man's condition. A wrong diagnosis at 
the PC can kill the patient; a moment 
of hesitation can waste what little 
time the victim has left. t> 



If I Only Had a Brain 



"Dr. Bodine! Dr. Bodine to the operating 
room!" 

"Beverly Hiilbilties" folk hero Jethro 
Bodine swore he was going to be a brain 
surgeon. If only he'd had Life & Death II: 
The Brain. 

Though it's a long way from a simula- 
tion, Life & Death U carries a certain realistic 
feel, enough to make the squeamish 
squirm when the scalpel is in their hands 
and the EKG monitor is beeping in the 
background. 

You play doctor as you diagnose pa- 
tients with a variety of neurological ail- 
ments. After a quick examination, you can 
request CAT, MRI, x-ray, or angiogram 
tests to pinpoint the problem. Then it gets 
interesting. You hit the operating room, in- 
stalments at your fingertips, with no idea of 
what to do. The hospital classroom is avail- 
able, but the text lessons are in big chunks, 
they're hard to remember, and they dont 
include any visual aids. 

Sounds and sights on a VGA-equipped 
PC with an Ad Lib or Sound Blaster board 
are impressive. You see the blood well up 
as you make an incision, hear the whine of 
the drill as you bore a hole in the skull look- 
ing to relieve a subdural hematoma. If you 
don't follow correct procedures, or heaven 
forbid, you make a wrong diagnosis, you'll 
get yanked from the OR and sent back to 
class with calls of Quack! echoing down the 
hospital halls. 

Life & Death ii is, believe it or not, great 
fun — even for someone like me who early 



"Hospitals are leery of letting stu- 
dents practice on people," says Bon- 
nie Sellig, the library's assistant 
director Instead, computer-assisted 
instruction lets rookie doctors try 
treatments and immediately see the 
outcome Just as a student pilot uses a 
simulator before climbing into the 
cockpit. '"Computer technology is the 
very beginning level of medical train- 
ing," Sellig says. 

But medicine holds even more 
hope for the PC. Sellig spells out a 
not-too-distanl future in which doc- 
tors use an integrated system to pull 
up all the records of a patient; see the 
treatments, diagnoses, and medica- 
tions given; and then review current 
literature to ensure that everything 
possible has been done. ''Doctors are 
going to have to be knowledgeable 
about computers," Sellig asserts. 
''[Computers are] going to be part of 
their life from now on." 

Linked with other commonplace 
technologies — the facsimile machine 
and the CD-ROM drive— PCs already 
send copies of crucial medical articles 
to doctors in rural areas and provide 
entire textbooks on disk. In the years 
ahead lie simpler point-and-click soft- 
ware and even voice-activated com- 
puters. "It's just a matter of keeping 
up," says Sellig. "And computers are 
what's doing it for us." 







si^ll'i-1 


^^n^ 








f. iiu 






a 


1 


jjps=? 




on decided that the fame and glory of medi- 
cine weren't worth passing out over. It may 
he no simulation, but it's the closest to a 
sharp knife any of us deserve to be. Move 
over, Jethro! 

—GREGG KEIZER 



Talk It Up 

The PC may play surrogate physician 
or help diagnose common illnesses, 
but these contributions pale nearly 
to insignificance in comparison with 
its impact on the handicapped. Com- 
puters, including heavily modified 
laptops, are providing the power and 
freedom of communication to peo- 
ple who can't speak. 



Sitting in a wheelchair, a quadri- 
plegic man watches the laptop's LCD 
screen. Using specialized software, he 
writes, not by pressing keys, but by al- 
most imperceptibly moving an eyelid. 
A flat sensor attached to his muscles 
reads the movement, and as a bright 
cursor scans across a graphic of the 
keyboard, it stops momentarily to en- 
ter a letter. Tedious? Not really, since 
the word processor leaps to conclu- 
sions and offers a list of words it 
thinks should come next. .A single 
flick of the eyelid, and the word pops 
up on the screen. The program can 
even be trained to remember the 
user's most-used words. 

Laptop speech add-ons like Dec- 
Talk put natural-sounding voices on 
chips inside the PC, letting the com- 
puter speak — even sing — for those 
who can't. Quick-response software 
like Talking Screen and E-Z Keys 
from Words + let the disabled "talk" 
much faster and more normally. 
Drawing programs provide a creative 
outlet and can be manipulated on the 
portable computer when switches are 
pressed, sipped, or squeezed. 

All this technolog>^ doesn't come 
cheap — customized laptops run 
$5,000 and up. But they're portable, 
they have legible screens, and they can 
carr>^ on conversations for as long as 
two hours between battery changes. 

Advanced technologies like voice 
recognition and virtual reality com- 
bine to show the future of computer- 
ized aides for the handicapped. At 
Pacific Gas & Electric, Bill Yee, a se- 
nior programming analyst, works with 
a robotic assistant. Yee, a quadriple- 
gic, talks, and the robotic arm re- 
sponds, bringing reams of computer 
printouts to his side, turning pages on 
command, and tearing sheets olTthe 



Feel the Burn 



Using a computer for extended periods can 
cause eyestrain for many people. But cou- 
pled with a program like Vision Aerobics, 
your computer can actually be used to 
strengthen the eyes. What's more, the 3-D 
glasses that come with this health-oriented 
software will let you play the role of Dr. 
Jacoby at your neighbor's next "Twin 
Peaks" party. 

Vision Aerobics combines three sepa- 
rate exercises into an interactive exercise 
program for your eyes. The Eyes in Motion 
exercise resembles an arcade game and is 
designed to improve your ability to make 
rapid and accurate eye motions. Letters 
flash onto your computer screen at differ- 
ent points, and you must press the key that 
corresponds to that letter. 

The Images exercise is aimed at pro- 
moting the muscles that align your eyes in 
order to improve your depth perception. It 
consists of a set of convergence and diver- 
gence exercises, during which you try to 
keep a set of images combined into one im- 



age as long as possible. To do this requires 
the 3~D glasses (not required in all exer- 
cises) and opening your eyes as wide as 
possible. You can really feel yourself work 
during this exercise, and it's easy to see 
where the program got the aerobics in its 
title. 

The last exercise, Relaxation, is a kind 
of electronic visual mantra, during which 
images float across the screen and tend to- 
ward the background while you think pleas- 
ant thoughts and try to relax your shoulder 
muscles. 

Taking a break from long periods of 
computer use is a good idea whether you 
own this program or not. You should look 
away from your screen and focus on some- 
thing across the room or outside the win- 
dow for at least five minutes every hour. 
Vision Aerobics claims to be able to 
strengthen your eyes with continued use. If 
your physician thinks you can benefit from 
this kind of exercise, it's worth looking Into, 
^PETER scisco 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 



21 



Repetitive Strain Injuries 



ELF and VLF electromagnetic radiation is 
certainly not the only hazard associated 
with lengthy sessions at the computer. The 
very act of typing could be crippling you, 
causing repetitive strain injuries, known as 
RSls. How? The answer is both simple and 
complex. 

For generations, piano teachers have 
urged students to play with their hands sus- 
pended above the keyboard. Unfortunately, 
typing instructors seem to care more about 
accuracy and speed than proper placement 
of the hands, so most of us never learn the 
correct way to use a keyboard. Our modern 
office environments have conspired against 
us, too. It's much faster and easier to send 
a message from one networked terminal to 
another than It is to handwrite a note or ac- 
tually deliver the message in person. All this 
typing might only be a pain in the fingertips 
if it weren't for our posture and the place- 
ment of our hands. 

Many people type with the heefs of 
their hands on the desktop and their hands 
angled upward to raise their fingers above 
the keys. This results in a constriction in the 
carpal tunnel, which is a conduit for the ten- 
dons that actuate the fingers. Constant 
movement through this tunnel has the 
same effect as rubbing your skin against 
the edge of a tabletop. Heat is generated, 

printer as he programs and debugs 
software. It performs the functions of 
a human assistant but does it more 
economically. The robot will pay for 
itself in less than two years. 

Virtual reality — creating artificial 
environments inside the PC that can 
be experienced like a sketchy version 
of the real world — also promises 
much for the handicapped. Connect- 
ed to a powerful PC in the not-too- 
distant future, people bound to 
wheelchairs will be able to "walk" 
through computer-made worlds, 
"run" for an imaginary touchdown, 



and the tendons become sore. This is the 
most common— and painful— form of RSI. 
but any motion you perform constantly can 
cause this kind of injury. Even the way you 
sit in your chair could lead to backache and 
other muscle pains and strains. 

If you can't (or don't care to) lift the 
heels of your hands from the desktop while 
typing, pads are available that will elevate 
your hands slightly, or you could make your 
own pad with a square of cardboard and 
some foam rubber. Also think about the 
way you sit at your desk. Would your 
grade-school teacher have given you satis- 
factory posture marks for the way you sit? 
Consider the possibility that your chair or 
desk may be too low (many are) or that the 
placement of your computer equipment 
causes you to sit in an unnatural or uncom- 
fortable position. Don't be afraid to experi- 
ment to find the right way to sit. 

Finally, take a break. Go and look out a 
window every so often. If you're fascinated 
by your work and don't really want to stop, 
set a timer on your watch or alarm clock to 
go off every hour or so. Just getting up and 
stretching your legs, looking at distant ob- 
jects, and conversing with friends can keep 
you fresh and alert and inoculate you 
against the stresses associated with being 
sedentary. — robertbixby 

or simply free themselves from the 
constraints of their afflictions. 

Hey, Coach! 

Imagine how motivated you'd be to 
eat right and keep fit if it meant your 
job. Think how youM watch what you 
eat if, when you arrived at the office 
each day, you were paid by how 
quickly you charged through the halls 
or by how many chairs you could 
knock out of the way. 

San Francisco 49er football play- 
ers, like everyone else in professional 
sports, are constantly judged on how 



well they perform, how often they 
win. It's no surprise, then, that Jerry 
Attaway, the 49ers strength and con- 
ditioning coach, uses PCs to help 
players manage their diets and calcu- 
late their conditioning. 

Attaway has calibrated the er- 
gometers on the exercise bicycles and 
combined them with a custom PC 
program that tells his chaises how 
long they've got to pump the pedals to 
consume a set number of calories. "It 
really hits home that way," Attaway 
says, "about how much work is in- 
volved to burn off the calories in a 
food." 

But it's in nutrition that he ex- 
cels. Using a program called Nutri- 
tional Analysis, Attaway tries to get 
professional athletes to change their 
eating habits. He's really trying to 
change their lifestyles. "There's only 
one or two guys on the team with a 
weight problem," he says. "Fm trying 
to get everyone to eat for their per- 
formance. I sit down and explain 
some physiological principles and, 
with the computer, show them what 
they normally eat, then do what-ifs on 
the bottom line — the calories. They 
go, *0h, yeah, I can do that,' or 
'Coach, what if I do this?' The com- 
puter gives us all sorts of options." 

Calculating a nutritional plan 
used to take Attaway half a day, and 
then it wouldn't be quite correct. Now 
it takes only ten minutes. "I make 
them do it," he says. "They see the 
numbers, and it's a way of teaching 
them how to enhance their per- 
formance or reduce the risk of heart 
disease or even certain kinds of 
cancer." 

The 49ers also use PCs to log in- 
juries and treatments, whether that 
means ice on an ankle or a session in 



More Miscarriages: Are VDTs Responsible? 



Pregnant women who work in front of 
VDTs for more than 20 hours a week run 
an 80-percent higher risk of miscarriage. 
That was the conclusion reached by re- 
searchers at the Northern California Kaiser 
Permanente Medical Care Program in Oak- 
land, California, after studying 1 583 preg- 
nant women who attended Kaiser 
Permanente obstetrics and gynecology 
clinics during the years 1981 and 1982 
ifimerican Journal of Industrial Medicine, 
June 1988). 

In the study, researchers compared 
the miscarriage rates of VDT users with 
those of women who performed the same 
type of work at their jobs but without 
VDTs. 

Video display terminals (VDTs) are 
known to emit very low frequency (VLF) 
and extremely low frequency (ELF) electro- 
magnetic fields (EM Fs)— that much has 
been proven. The question is whether 
EMFs at those frequencies are harmful to 



humans, and more specifically, to the 
unborn. 

While the evidence so far seems to 
weigh against VDTs, a recent study from 
the National Institute for Occupational Safe- 
ty and Health reached a completely differ- 
ent conclusion {New England Journal of 
Medicine, March 14, 1991). Of the 730 
women included in the NIOSH study 307 
were directory-assistance operators who 
used VDTs, and the other 430 were general 
operators who performed similar work 
using both LED (Light-Emitting Diode) and 
NGT (Neon Globe Tube) monitors, which 
emit no EMFs. 

Both VDT and non-VDT workstations 
were measured directly for VLF and ELF 
emissions, as were background areas 
away from the workers. 

In their detailed study, researchers 
concluded that VDT use did not, in fact, in- 
crease the risk of miscarriage: "The rate of 
spontaneous abortion for women with 



more than 25 hours of VDT use per week 
was similar to that for women witii no hours 

of use per week The use of VDTs and 

exposure to the accompanying electromag- 
netic fields were not associated with an in- 
creased risk of spontaneous abortion in 
this study" 

The study did confirm several other 
factors already known to be associated 
with an increased risk of miscaniage: previ- 
ous miscanriage, the use of alcohol, the use 
of cigarettes, and the presence of a thyroid 
disorder. 

Until more studies are conducted com- 
paring VDT use and miscarriages, the jury 
will remain out on this one. Whatever the 
findings of the next study^ however, one 
thing is for certain: Enough studies have 
been conducted that we can say with fair 
certainty that exposure to EMFs is harmful. 
That fact alone may render any hjture cor- 
relation bebween VDT use and the risk of 
miscamage purely academic. 

-^ILL CHAMPiON 



22 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



the whirlpooL Everything goes into a 
player's file at the end of the season- 
missed practices, missed games due to 
injuries—and is reviewed by the or^ga- 
nization. That PC use probably makes 
some players nervous. "Pro football 
players don't like to keep records," 
laughs Attaway. "You can't let the 
paranoia take over. If you don*t win, 
they're going to fire all of us anyway. 
You just do the best you can," 

Warning: Computer in Use 

Your PC may pose a potential threat 
to your health. Surprised? 

Monitors are the prime suspect. 
They emit electromagnetic radiation 
at VLF and ELF levels. Although 
studies are far from conclusive, many 
researchers warn of possible health 
risks associated with high electromag- 
netic radiation levels, including mis- 
carriages and cancer. San Francisco, 
the first American city to regulate 
working conditions at computer mon- 
itors and terminals, has even estab- 
lished a Video Display Terminal 
Advisory Committee to report on, 
among other things, electromagnetic 
fields. 

You can reduce the risk simply 
and inexpensively. Don't crowd your 
screen: Radiation levels drop sharply 
two to four feet from the monitor. 
Turn off any monitor you're not 
using, as well as laser printers and 
copiers, because they also throw out 



Food for Thought 

Have you ever wondered exactly what's 
in that pizza you've been gnawing on 
during a late-night session with King's 
Quests Or those potato chips you 
clogged your keyboard with while chat- 
ting on CompuServe? Now your conn- 
puter can tell you. Sant§ (pronounced 
santay, which is French for health) is a 
new computer program designed to 
help you eat better by providing com- 
puterized meat and recipe analyses. 
Created under the strict supervi- 
sion of a registered dietitian, Sant^ first 
asks you a few short questions about 
yourself and then lets you select your 
foods from 3000 possible choices, sup- 
plying you with a full analysis of your 
meals and full day's intake. Detailed re- 
ports cover calories, cholesterol ^ fat, 
and essential vitamins and minerals— 
29 nutrients in all. How you measure up 
to the government's Recommended Di- 
etary Allowances is computed automati- 
cally. It even takes into account your 
age, sex, and other information. The 
software comes with a dozen dietitian- 
tested recipes and a coupon good for 
hundreds of additional free recipes. 

—ALAN BECHTOLD 



large electromagnetic fields. And if 
you have several computers in your 
home office, position them so that the 
monitors' sides and backs don't face 
your work space: Radiation levels are 
typically weakest from the front. 

More costly solutions range from 



antiradiation screens to low-radiation 
monitors. For $ 1 39 you can buy 
NoRad's screen, which, according to 
the company, stops 99 percent of the 
electric radiation at VLF and ELF lev- 
els. Low-radiation monitors are pricey 
but available from major manufactur- 
ers like NEC, Sigma, and Qume, They 
block electromagnetic radiation, but 
only at VLF levels. Or you may want 
to switch to an LCD monitor, like 
those on laptops. LCD screens emit 
negligible radiation. Safe Computing 
makes desktop-sized LCD screens, 
but the cost— $2,495 for a backlit 
VGA model— is prohibitive to all but 
the wealthiest home computer users. 
The catalog of less threatening, 
but still harmful, effects includes every- 
thing from headaches and eyestrain to 
backaches and carpal tunnel syn- 
drome, a persistent pain in the wrist. 
Tired muscles and eyes can be relieved 
by wTist support pads at the keyboard, 
an adjustable chair, and property posi- 
tioned lighting to reduce glare on the 
screen. Headaches can be combated by 
taking breaks from the computer. 

Heal Your PC 

Unaccountable system crashes. Ex- 
traordinarily long times to load pro- 
grams. Corrupted (and crucial) files. 
Sound familiar? If so, your PC may be 
the sickest thing in your house. 

A PC can succumb to illnesses, 
too. Some ailments come from care- 





Product List 




Btrds W Sees for 7-12 Yaar Otds 


EZ Keysffatklng Scrmn 


Lifecycle Aerobic Trainer 


San*6 


$14.95 


$1,195.00 


$1,598.00 


$149.00 


IntraCorp 


Wbrds+ 


LifeFitness 


Hopkins Technology 


14202 SW 136th St. 


44421 10th St. W,#L 


9601 Jeronimo Rd. 


421 Hazel Ln. 


M!ami.FL 33186 


Lancaster. CA 93534 


Irvine. CA 92718 


Hopkins, MN 55343-71 17 


(800) 4S8-7226 


(800)869-8521 


(800) 735-3867 


(612)931-9376 


{305)252-9040 


(805)949-8331 


(714)859-1011 


Understanding AfDS 


CteanUp 


FitnesB ProfilB 


NEC 3DS Low-Emissions Monitor 


S49.95 


$35.00 


$395.00 


$1,049.00 


SAE Software 


Scan 


V^fellsource 


NEC 


P.O. Box 13738 


$25.00 


15431 SE82n<J Dr.. Ste. D 


1255 Michael Dr. 


EdwardsvJIIe.KS 66113 


McAfee Associates 


Clackamas, OR 97015 


V\foodDale.lL60191 


(800)748-7734 


4423CheeneySt. 


(800)533-9355 


(708) 860-9500 


(913)441-1868 


Santa Clara, CA 95054 


(503)656-7446 


Norton Antivirus 


VIrex-PC 


(408} 988-3832 


food Processor// 


$129.95 


$129.95 


CompuServe 


$295.00 


Symantec/Peter Norton Computing 


Micfocom 


5000 Arlington Centre Blvd. 


ESHA Research 


10201 Torre Ave. 


P.O. Box 51489 


Columbus, OH 43220 


P.O. Box 13028 


Cupertino. CA 9501 4 


Durham. NC 27717 


(800)848-8199 


Salem. OR 97309 


(800)343-4714 


(919)490-1277 


The DietBf's Edgs 


(503) 585-6242 


(408)253-9600 


ViniCide 


$49.95 


Home Doctor 


PageView, L* View, SilverView 


$49.00 


Training Table Systems 


$39.95 


Reduced-Emissions Monitors 


DiBtAnaiyst 


17624 Golfview 


Dynacomp 


$1,299.00-S2,495.00 


$59.00 


Uvonia, Ml 48152 


Dynacomp Office BIdg. 


Sigma Designs 


Parsons Technology 


(800)338-6644 


178 Phillips Rd. 


46501 Landing Pkwy. 


375 Collins Rd. NE 


Diet WiseJEnergy WIsb 

$159,00 

Nutritionaf Data Resources 


Webster, NY 14580 


Fremont, CA 94538 


P.O. Box 3120 


(716)671-6160 


(415)770-0100 


Cedar Rapids, f A 52406 


Ufe&Oeathn. The Brain 


QMe35VLF Super VGA IVIonitor 


(800) 223-6925 


P.O. Box 540 


$49.95 


$699.00 


Vision Aerobics 


Willoughby. OH 44094 


Software Toolworks 


Qume 


$129.00 


(800) 637-3438 


60 Leveroni Ct. 


SOOYosemiteDr. 


Vision Aerobics 


(21 6) 951 -6593 (in Ohio) 


Novaio. CA 94949 


Milpttas. CA 95035 


10 Mechanic St., Ste. G 


DtUF Windows 


(415)883-3000 


(800)457^W47 


Red Bank. N J 07701 


$295.00 




(408)942-4000 


(201)219-1916 


DINE Systems 








586 N. French Rd., Ste. 2 








Amherst. NY 14228 








(716)688-2492 









JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 23 



lessness or unforeseen events, like 
using out-of-date printer drivers or 
electrical blackouts. Others are harder 
to diagnose and treat, like incompati- 
ble software or a damaged hard disk 
drive. But nothing comes close to a 
computer virus for sheer terror. 

Viruses, those small bits of com- 
puter code maliciously placed inside 
innocent software carriers, can rob 
you of valuable data or make your PC 
virtually unusable. Where you pick up 
a virus — from public domain soft- 
ware, from a program you eagerly 
^'borrowed," or in some limited cases, 
even from commercial software — is 
almost beside the point. Once your 
PC has a virus, once your PC starts 
acting strangely and unpredictably, it 
may already be too late. Fortunately, 
several good detection programs can 
spot and eliminate viruses before they 
have a chance to lay your PC low. 

One capable package is Vi rex-PC. 
This three-program combination 
scans your disk, checking each file for 
137 different virus strains. It also con- 
stantly watches over your computer 
and alerts you when potential viral ac- 
tivity is detected. .4nd it eradicates 
some (though not all) of the vinises it 
finds. You pay a price for this protec- 
tion — Virex-PC consumes 3 1 K of pre- 
cious RAM. 

Norton Antivirus is a slightly 
more expensive virus-protection 
package. Antivirus identifies 142 
strains and uses three methods to de- 
tect viruses: It watches each disk read, 
scans memory for viruses, and scans 
disks for suspicious strings of charac- 
ters that may mark a virtis. Once Anti- 
Virus spots a virtis, it tries to destroy 



Dr. Future 



Modern medicine consumes technology. 
From CAT scans to computerized diagnos- 
tic databases, medicine pushes the techno- 
logical envelope harder than atmost any 
other profession. Its appetite for high-tech 
solutions is voracious. On the whole we ac- 
cept that appetite, since we believe the 
end— saving lives— justifies almost any 
means. But where is high-tech, particularly 
computer technology, taking medidne? We 
asked two editors at Omni, COMPUTE'S 
sister magazine that specializes in science, 
to dream a bit about Dr. Future. 

"In the well-equipped middle-class 
household [of 2010], your bathroom wilt be 
an adjunct to your doctor's office, with 
monitors, sensing devices, and other high- 
tech paraphernalia/' says Keith Ferrell, edi- 
tor of Omni magazine. "You'll go to the 
doctor, for instance, to have bones set, but 
certainly blood pressure, blood, urine, fe- 
ces, and semen can all be examined at 
home and the data transmitted electronical- 
ly to your doctor. More important, though, 
the computer will replace the experimental 
animal. The computer will act as a virtual 
guinea pig," says Ferrell, outlining how 
computer simulations will test new drugs 
and procedures, all without the necessity of 
animaJ or human testing. 

it and repair the damage done. 

Actually, viruses are rare. Thai's 
why you may want to use Scan and 
save yourself the RAM used by pro- 
grams like Virex and Antivirus, Scan 
and its companion, Clean-Up, don't 
constantly watch for viruses. Instead, 
you run Scan if you suspect your PC 
has caught a bug and then run Clean- 
up to mend any faulty files. The com- 
bination takes care of most viral 
infections and damage, but if you 
don't remember to regularly check 



Biking Rough Terrain — ^at Home 



You hope your muscles won't give out 

before finishing the last leg of this vigorous 
bike ride through rough terrain. That's easi- 
er said than done: A 3K hil! looms before 
you. You begin the ascent, pedaling harder 
and harder — ^and then the telephone rings. 
Pressing Pause on the display console, you 
hop off your bike and race to the next room 
to answer the phone. 

Come again? A pause button? Weren't 
we just in the throes of pre-OJympic bike 
training? The answer is Yes— sort of. Actu- 
ally we were about to finish the last leg of 
one of the numerous exercise programs on 
the Lifecyde. While you weren't actually rid- 
ing over rough terrain, the hills were very 
real where it counts— in your legs, heart, 
and lungs. 

The Lifecyde Is a stationary bike com- 
puterized to simulate actual outdoor bike 
riding, and, indeed, you'll feel as though 
you've been on an outdoor trek if you can 
make it through a full 12-mlnute program. 

Unlike other stationary bikes, the Life- 
cycle is programmed for "interval training 
with progressive overload." In plain Eng- 
lish, that means your pedaling will change 



penodically^ — becoming sometimes more 

difficult, sometimes easier— as the pro- 
gram emulates the various ups and downs 
you'd encounter on a real outdoor ride. 
Both hills and valleys are visualized on the 
bike's display console as red and yellow 
lights that move up and down as pedaling 
difficulty increases and decreases. As for 
the 3K hiil, you may have to use your imagi- 
nation to see the real thing, but you'll feel as 
though you were there. 

One of the best things about training 
with the Lifecyde, besides the fact that nei- 
ther wind, nor rain, nor dark of night will 
keep you from taking a ride anytime you 
want, is that beginners as well as condition- 
ed athletes will find complete pedaling pro- 
grams compatible with their abilities. The 
different levels of programs vary in hill in- 
tensity and duration, allowing you to gradu- 
ate to higher levels as your conditioning 
progresses- Among other things, you can 
test your heart rate and maximum oxygen 
uptake (MOU) and watch the number of cal- 
ories expended per hour and mites ped- 
aled. Now, if they only could add a few 
trees and a nice breeze. . . . 

— JILLCHAMPiON 



Mary Glucksman, Omn/'s medical edi- 
tor, suggests other home health care tech- 
nologies. "There will certainly be very 
detailed prenatal care [software]," she 
says. "This will help women maximize their 
nutritional intake as well as help them avokJ 
harmful foods." And women will use soft- 
ware for botti contraception and concep- 
tion. ''Programs will analyze temperature 
fluctuations on a daily basis, then chart and 
compare [them] to tiie norm" as women 
track their menstrual cycles to either boost 
the chance of conception or as a form of 
chemical- and device-free birth conti'ol. 

And technology-Intensive develop- 
ments of today foreshadow what hearth 
care may be like in 20 years. Microma- 
chines wfth metallic gears a couple of hair- 
widths wide will be used to "Roto-Rooter" 
cfogged arteries or for superprecise sur- 
gery beyond the abilities of the steadiest 
surgeon. Computer-controlled x-ray equip- 
ment will put the inside of your body on a 
video screen in realtime, letting doctors 
watch tiie inner workings of the human 
body without lifting a scalpel. Robotic assis- 
tants will grind sockets for a perfect fit of 
replacement joints in the hip and knee. 

It's all in the hands of Dr. Future. 

—GREGG KHZER 

your PC, it could become irreversibly 
infected before you notice. 

Another option is ViruCide from 
Parsons Technology. It should be run 
regularly for file maintenance, like 
Scan. It removes viruses and repairs 
files wherever possible. As a premi- 
um. Parsons provides a book about 
computer viruses so you will know 
what you are up against. 

Prevention is the key to 
computer health. 

Only the Beginning 

Crude. That's the current state of 
health computing. In ten yean, or 
even in five, what you'll be able to do 
with your household PC will make to- 
day's possibilities seem laughable. 

As the information revolution 
continues to hit home, you'll be able 
to contact your family doctor elec- 
tronically to book appointments and 
ask simple questions. You'll be able to 
keep up with groundbreaking medical 
research by going online and reading 
clips your computer has collected for 
you from professional journals and 
consumer magazines. Your doctor 
will send prescriptions to the pharma- 
cy via computer, and you'll file claims 
to your medical insurance company 
the same way. The PC will monitor 
your wellness, reminding you of im- 
munizations for the kids and watching 
your blood pressure and cholesterol 
through the add-on diagnostic tools 
you'll connect to it. It will become an 
invaluable adjunct to your health. 

Your home PC is a good health 
tool now. Someday it'll be great H 



24 



COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



# TEST LAB 




This month COMPUTES Test Lab focuses on modems, 
fax boards, and fax/modems. With these technological 
marvels, you can use your computer to order aidine 
tickets, send and receive important documents, do your 
banking, communicate with people who have similar in- 
terests, and tap into a world of information. COMPUTE's 
expert reviews will help you decide what you want and 
need, as our reviewers examine installation, software, 
hardware requirements, and special capabilities in clear, 
unintimidating language. YouMl get the facts and the fig- 
ures, the sidebars and the statistics you need to understand 
these devices and make the right buying decision. 




Brooktrout Fax-Mail 96 

The Complete FAX/Portable 

Fremont Frecom Fax96 

GVC Mini-FaxModem FMM-4824 

Hayes JT Fax 4800 Portable M 

Hayes JT Fax 9600B fl 

Intel SatisFAXtion * 

Okidata Okitel 2400B Plus PC Modem 

Tandy FaxMate 

Touchbase WortdPort 2400 Modem 

Zoom/Modem HC2400S SendFax 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 25 



"It expanded my horizons, 
without exceeding my budget " 

"With PRODIGY,® there's a panorama 
of information, services, advice, 
and entertainment at my commands 

Hundreds of exciting features, and all for 
just $12,95 a month, with no online time 
charges. That means 1 can use PRODIGY 
without worrying that the meter is running. 

""The great graphics and friendly interface are 
real attention-getters. And the menus and 
cross-referencing features make it so easy, 
my whole family's involved, 

"There's so much to tell you about PRODIGY, 
I hardly know where to start. 

** We talk to other members. 

We all love the PRODIGY clubs where 
we exchange information about things 
we eiyoy The computer club is great 
because it keeps me up on the latest 
PC technology My wife's favorite is the food 
club where she shares recipes and tips, 

"I do more shopping and banking 
in a lot less time. 

I go window-shopping for ideas on PRODIGY 
and make purchases by keyboard instead— 
of by car, And when the bills arrive, no 
problem. With PRODIGY I can pay them 
right from my PG It would take all - „ 
day to tell you about all the exciting 
things I do on PRODIGY. 

^Tou gotta get this thing." 

The PRODIGY service, connected to your home 
computer and phone 
line, has games, sports 
mformation, an encyclo- 
pedia, and much, much 
more. And, it's just $12.95 
a month, including 
30 personal messages.* 

PRODIGY is available for IBM^or compatlble.^nd Macintosh*^ 
computers. Call 1-80D-776-3693, ext.212,tormdout v 
you can purchase a PRODIGY Sen-ice Start -up Kit 
now. Or look for PRODIGY already included 
with many popular computers. 

Circle Reader Service 






# TEST LAB 



BROOKTROUT FAX-MAIL 96 



I hold the record for fax-document 
jams. That*s why I was thrilled to 
get something other than the stand- 
ard manual-feed fax machine. The 
Brooktrout Fax-Mail board met and 
exceeded all of my hopes, and Fve 
gotten over my fax phobia at long last. 

Fax-board installations can 
stump even expansion-card installa- 
tion veterans. That's because they 
often conflict with other devices and 
software already installed. This was 
no exception to that rule. But the 
manual was complete and walked me 
through troubleshooting steps that 
anyone could' ve followed. 

The software that comes with the 
system is menu driven and easy to 
use. I had no trouble adjusting the 
configuration and preferences for 
my needs. The configuration and 
system software passed the No 
Manual Needed test. They were 
so easy to use that, until I was ready 
for the advanced features, the manual 
wasn't necessary. And my AUTO- 
EXEC BAT file was automatically up- 
dated, saving me from having to 
manually edit it. 

Sending faxes from text files is 
simple. Select the file, enter the desti- 
nation phone number, and tell it to 
start. The Fax-Mail system does the 
rest — converting it to the correct for- 
mat, dialing the phone, sending the 
fax, error checking, and terminating 
the call. On the other end the faxes ar- 
rive looking just as if Fd sent them 
through one of the old-fashioned faxes 
(probably better since I would've had 
at least one document jam). Sending 
graphics files in PCX formal is just as 
easy. The software takes care of all the 
conversion details for you. 

Receiving was almost as easy. 
The documents are saved to a disk file 
and can be viewed on the screen or 
sent to your printer. My Panasonic 
KX-P4420 laser printer's RAM filled 
up and generated an error message oc- 
casionally. Then I read the docu- 
mentation and found out that I didn't 



installation: internal 
Slot/Bus Reciuired: 8-bit 
Fax Group Supported: 3 
Other Requirements: n/a 
List Price: $499.00 

BROOKTROUT TECHNOLOGY 
144 Gould St. 
Needham, MA 02192 
(617)449-4100 





have enough memory for 300-dpi out- 
put. Changing to 100 dpi made all the 
difierence. I didn't have any trouble 
after that. 

If you fear or loathe fax ma- 
chines, the Brooktrout Fax-Mail 96 is 
your ticket. With it, you can forget 



document jams and unintelligible er- 
rors — and enjoy smooth sailing into a 
better-working office or business. i> 

RICHARD C LEINECKER 



Xerox Fax Firsts 

Rrst wtth LDX (Long Distance Xerography) — 1 964 
First to introduce desktop fax — Telecopier 1—1966 
First to use automatic document iiandler— Telecopier 41 — 1973 
First in plain paper laser fax — Telecopier 200 — 1975 
First to use an automatic dialer— Telecopier 200—1976 
First to use white line skipping — Tel^xspter 485 — 1980 
First to enhance fax multifunctionatity — FaxMaster software — 1984 
First to introduce plain paper use — Telecopier 7020—1986 

First to develop a fax terminal capable of communicating wtth computers — Telecopier 
7021—1987 

Facsimih Facts & Figures, 1990/91. EnteiT^tional Fac^mile Associatiofi 



— DArtDOAY 



# TEST LAB 



THE CX)MPLETE FAX/PORTABLE 



Talk about small Who wouldVe 
thought you'd be able to buy a fax 
machine that's only 5'/2 inches 
long and 2'/: inches wide? Before 
you rush out to buy one, let me ex- 
plain. This fax machine doesn*l come 
with a printer, and you can't put paper 
in it — but when hooked to a com- 
puter, it can do just about everything 
a conventional fax machine can do 
and more. 

Here's how it works. If you have 
a page scanner, you can feed your 
pages directly into the fax machine. 
Otherwise, you'll need to prepare your 
pages electronically. You can use the 
built-in text editor or your own word 
processor. Rather than convert the 
various word processor file formats^ 
the Complete FAX/Poriable includes 
a memory-resident program that cap- 
tures your word processors printer 
output and automatically sends it out 
as a fax. You simply configure your 
word processor for an Epson printer 
(it's OK if you have another kind of 
printer), press the hot key (usually Alt- 
F), fill out the information in the Fax 
Hot-Key window, and print the file 
from your word processor. 

Unfortunately, the pop-up Fax 
Hot-Key window won't work from 
some programs, including Microsoft 
Windows, DESQview, and any appli- 
cation that operates in the Hercules 
graphics mode. There are work- 
arounds for most of these programs. 
With Windows, for example, although 
you can't use the hot key, you can 
print files from Windows to the fax 
board as long as you've installed the 
fax program before going into Win- 
dows. There are two drawbacks. First, 
any printing from Windows at that 
point will be faxed and you won't be 
able to print to your printer. Second, 
to regain printing control in Win- 
dows, you'll need to exit Windows 
and deactivate the fax program. This 
would be a strong argument for not 
starting the fax program from your 
AUTOEXEC.B.AT file. 

28 COMPUTE 



a 



Instaflation: external 

Slot/Bus Required: n/a 

Fax Group Supported: 3 

Other Requirements: 640K RAM, graphics 

adapter, hard disk with at least 31MB available/ 

serial port 

List Price: $499.00 

THE COMPLETE PC 
1983 Concourse Dr, 
San Jose, CA 95131 
(408)434-0145 




You can also send ASCII text 
files and many kinds of graphics files, 
including PC Paintbrush-h (PCX), 
Microsoft Windows Paint (MSP), 
Tagged Image File Format (TIFF 
class B), and Dr. HALO II and /// 
(CUT) files. 

While the software could've been 
easier to use (especially with Win- 
dows), I had no trouble sending or 
receiving faxes. It's a bit pricey, so 
you'd be better off buying a less- 



expensive fax card for your desktop 
computer. On the other hand, the 
unit's small size makes it a good 
choice for laptops, especially if you 
already have a modem. i> 

DAVID ENGLISH 



JULY 1991 



After I bombed with dBase, I almost 
gave up automating our office... 

...but after a few hours with Alpha FOUR^ I had a ftiUy operational application! 



At our Monday morning staff meeting, 
I announced I was going to automate our 
sales tracking and invoicing sv'stem later 
that day. 

Skepticism ran high. "Paul, you prom- 
ised me an application like that two yeais 
ago," said Marge. "You couldn't do it, and 
neither could that dBASE programmer you 
hired. It'll never happen!" 

rd already tried three times before to 
program a database: first with dB.^E (much too complicated). 
Then 1 tried Q&A (not powerful enough). Then 1 bought Paradox 
(just like dBASE). They were all either too complicated, or not capable 
enough for our needs. 

This time, 1 was confident. Vtliy? Because 1 just bought Alpha Four, the relational 
database for non-programmers like me. 

I knew within houis, I'd be able to build a fully relational customer 
tracking and billing s\^tem, complete with custom menus, beauti- 
ful screens and extensive help messages for error-free data entry. 
^" And that's exactly what 1 did. You 

should have seen Marge's face 
when the firet, perfectly 
formatted invoice 
came off the printer. 
I DEVELOPED MY 
APPLICATION & 
REPORTS IN MINUTES 

With the ''application out- 
liner," 1 automatically set up 
a system of menus, submenus, 
and procedures based on the outline 1 laid out. 

Alpha Four's report writer was even more impressive. I "painted" reporLs and 
invoices on-screen. They looked exactly like I wanted them to— much better than 
our old paper forms. I alwav'S ran out of power with other simple-to-use data- 
bases; they weren't relalional. Widi Alpha Four, I created different databases for 
customers, invoices and inventory and then related them into a "set," just by 
drawing on-screen, a diagram of the links between the databases. 
I'LL NEVER KEY IN Dr\TA T^ICE AGAIN 

Now, we never have to enter the same information more than once. N^ew 
invoices can be generated for existing customers without having to re-enter their 
information— we just "look it up*' in our customer database. 

And I was delighted that Alpha Four is totally compatible with dBASE .dbf files. 
Our mailing list went right into the new application without even having to con- 
wTl the files! 
FASTER, MORE ACCURATE DATA ENTRY 

When you enter data, you can automatically change the case of lettei^ 
from lower to upper. You can display data entrv' templates for formatted 
fields like phone numbei^, or skip over fields when certain conditions 
are met. Of coui^, ail calculations are performed automatically. 
Look-ups are super flexible. Vou can display information from 
a look-up database in a multi-column mndow anywhere on the 
screen. Select from the window and Alpha Four automatically fills in 
the related information. 

•Qualifting packages inciude: programming daiabases (dBASE* II. [11, and [V, Paradox, Clipper,' 
Foxbase* fox Pro* Rev-elaUon, ett). fiai-fiie diLabases (Q&.A,» PFS: Professional File.* Rapid file* 
etc.), integrated padogps (Microwfl «brfa.* PFSRisl Choice » Lotus Wtoris » etc.), and mailing lis; 
manager (Fasipack Mail, etc.) or sp(»?adsbeets *ilh daiabases tLotus l-2'3.» Quattro Pro*). 
All tradeniarks are n*gst£red with the appropriaie companie. 





SIMPLER 
THAN dBASE 
AND PARADOX- 
MORE POWERFUL 
THANQAA 



SAVE $450 WITH 
THIS AD! 
Special $99 Offer: 
Upgrade From 
Your Existing 
Data Manager* 

If you already have 
any database software, 
integrated package or 
mail list manager, or 
ifvou are currently 



^ 



using your spreadsheet to manage data, you can upgrade to 
Alpha Four for just S99. 
NO RISK OFFER! 

If you're not satisfied, return Alpha Four within 60 da^-s for a full refund. This 
is a limited-time, one-copy- })er-organization offer. So order today! 
HOWrO ORDER 

Mail the coupon below to Alpha Software or take it 
to Egghead Discount Software, Soft Warehouse, or your 
local dealer to pick up your Alpha Four Upgrade 
Package. Remember to bring proof you have an exist- 
ing qualifying products 

For Fastest Service Call: 1-800-852-5750. Ext. 117 
Onlets Only Hodine: 1-800-336-6644 Or Fax the order 
form to: 1-617-272-4876. Or mail to: Alpha Software 
* ' ; Corporation, One North Avenue. Burlington, MA 01803. 

In Canada Call: 1-S0(H5]-I0I8, Ext 177, Or k\ y*our order to: l-4l6-565'1024. Or majl coupon to; 
Alpha Softwajt? Corp. 626 King Street. Suite 301, Tomnio, Ontario M5V 1M7. 

Alpha FOUR *99 Upgrade Offer 

(Suggested Retail Price S549) 




UNS iUPi 

dBASF 



'BE.S r BUY' 




A ¥ J~^\ f A One Xorih .^v-e. Hurl jngiot 

/aLi rT/V 1-800^852-5750, 



S<>TAVARE OORPCiRATXDN 



iiurlingioti, \IK 10803 
Ext,U7 

OnkrsOnlYtt«llne; 1-800-336-4644 



[2f Yes ! Please send me the Alpha Four reiaiioml database for non-program- 
nm fof jtisl S99 (SRP: 1549), plus S8.50 shipping and handling. I understand it 
is fulh guaranteed and 1 may return it within 60 dav-s for a full refuni I ha>Te 
mclfiseil ih« D3VCT pa^ of my existing quaJihing produa* manual (or original 



.Method of Pa^-mcnt (ma mtitnti. »dd >% iiia tjil 
Q tlwck Enciosd □ Charpf niy; Q MC □ Vi^a 



Ciud#_ 



□ miex 

_ Exp 



Addnss- 



Cit>, Staie, Zip _ 



im tut *t h« i^xsiona item! iiju- cxdtf ) 

Diskette Size Select one; Q yvT Q 5-1/4" 

Offer subject lo change without notification 



TAN 



Circle Reader S«rvrce Number 162 



# TEST LAB 



FRECOM FAX96 



The fax has come of age! No longer 
must you wail in line at the fax 
machine. With the Frecom Fax96 
board from Fremont Communi- 
cations installed in your computer, 
you can send faxes at your leisure. 

The Frecom Fax 96 software lets 
you send several faxes to one person 
or broadcast a fax to several people se- 
lected from the online phone book. 
You can even schedule a fax to be sent 
when you're out of the office and the 
phone rales are lower. 

A special feature included with 
the Fax96 is the ability to send TIFF 
or PCX file formats, or if you use a 
scanner, you can send images directly 
from the scanner as well as scanned 
disk files. Another handy feature is 
the log that automatically records the 
faxes you send. The quality of the 
graphics faxes I received could com- 
pete with graphics from any fax ma- 
chine Fve ever used. The printout of 
the PCX file (640 X 350 resolution) 
transmitted almost to the dot resolu- 
tion of the original 

Demo and tutorial modes take 
you through procedures step by step. 
There's also online help available, but 
you won't need these aids if you've 
used a fax machine. The control panel 
buttons make it easy to use the pro- 
gram even with limited exposure to 
the manual. 

The documentation is relatively 
easy to follow as far as the installation 
of the board and the software goes. 
The manual is straightforward and 
easy to read, but some topics aren't 
easily found because some of the new 
features are not in the orginal opera- 
tor's manual. An addendum describes 
the new features. 

The positive features of the Fre- 
com Fax96 move this board to the top 
of my list of favorite peripherals, but 
there are several options that 1 would 
like to see added in the next software 
update. The background receive op- 
tion is accessible either from the com- 
mand line or from the Exit menu. joyce sides 

30 COMPUTE JULY 1991 



8-bit ^m 
Bd:3 3 



Installation: fnternai 
Siot/Bus Required: 8-bit 
Fax Group Supported: 3 
Other Requirements: CGA, EGA, 
VGA, or IHercules 
List Price: $195,00 
FREiVIONT COMiWUNICATIONS 
46309 Warm Springs Blvd. 
Fremont, CA 94539 
(415)436-5000 




You should be able to toggle this com- 
mand from any menu in the program. 
Custom fonts and mouse support 
would also be welcome additions, 

Fremont Communications offers 
a 30-day money-back guarantee on 
the product as well as a one-year war- 
ranty. If one year isn't adequate, you 
can add a second year for 10 percent 
of the current price. As a convenience, 
you send your warranty through the 
fax board to test its installation. 

If you're constantly sending faxes 
and you'd like to improve your pro- 
ductivity, a fax board is the way to go. 
The Frecom Fax96 provides this 
convenient, timesaving way to trans- 
mit faxes for a reasonable price. > 



Fax Groupies 



Group 1. Speed of six minutes per 
page. Introduced in 1974. 

Group 2. Speed increased to three nnin- 
utes per page. Introduced in 1976. 

Group 3. Speed increased to one min- 
ute or less. Introduced in 1980. 

Group 4. Speeds as fast as 3 seconds 
per page, introduced in 1984. 

— DWIDDAY 
Facsimite Facts i, Figures. 1990/97 
Internatkxia] Facsimiie Association JBU 



\ 



See The World 




And Never Leave Home 



Discover a world beyond 

word processing and spread 

sheets. Let your computer take 

you to new lands. Take flight! 

Spread your wings and travel to 

exotic places. Let your computer 

thrill you with new experiences* 

•900-860-1543 

,00 the first minute and $1 .00 each additional minute. 
VOu are undef 18 please get your parents peimission before dialMT^. 





Software Publishers Association 

1101 Connecticut Ave, NW. Suite 901 

Washington, DC 20036 




To learn more about 

home software, call 

for our free colorful 

brochure, 'The Other 

Side of Computing". 

It describes the variety of software 

you can use on your computer. 

Let your computer entertain and 

educate you! 



t N S U M £ B 
SOFTWARE 
SECTION 



# TEST LAB 



GVC MINI-FAXMODEM 
FMM-4824 



Be careful with this fax machine; 
it's easy to misplace. When you 
realize that two of them can hide 
under a business-sized envelope, 
you'll have some indication of just 
how small GVCs Mini-FaxModem 
FMM-4824 is. 

Weighing in at 6.5 ounces (in- 
cluding batter>'), the Mini-Fax is 
about the size of a pack of cigarettes, 
but it works like a full-sized machine. 
It sends fax files at 4800 or 2400 bps 
and doubles as a conventional mo- 
dem at speeds up to 2400 bps. 

The Mini-Fax won't tie up any of 
your PC's internal slots. It plugs di- 
rectly into a 25-pin RS-232 port. If 
your PC's serial port has 9 pins, the 
Mini-Fax connects easily with an op- 
tional 25-pin to 9-pin converter. 

The Mini-Fax is 100-percent 
Hayes compatible, has a built-in 
speaker, and can schedule transmis- 
sions to take advantage of lower night 
rates. It will also send faxes to multi* 
pie destinations that you select from 
its dialing directory, and it can oper- 
ate in a background mode while your 
computer performs other chores. 

This mighty midget handles 
graphics as well as text files. With its 
Quick Link II Fax software, you can 
send text, PC Paintbrush (PCX), 
MacPaint (MAC), or Tagged Image 
File Formal (TIF) graphic files from 
your desktop or laptop PC. It includes 
a text editor and a function for merg- 
ing text and graphic files. It also gener- 
ates cover sheets and can include your 
logo graphic, if desired. 

The Mini-FaxModem FMM- 
4824 comes with software on 3^2- and 
5V4-inch disks, an AC adapter, a tele- 
phone cable, a modem holder, and a 
carrying pouch. Whether you use it at 
home, in the office, or on the road, 
you'll fmd the Mini-Fax compact, easy 
to set up, and simple to operate. > 

TOMNETSEL 



Installatron: externaf 
Slot/Bus Required: n/a 
Fax Group Supported: 3 
Other Requirements: 128K RAM 
List Price: $219.00 

GVC TECHNOLjOGIES 
99 Demarest Rd. 
Sparta, N J 07871 
(201)579-3630 ^^^^ 





-I 





32 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



How to Talk to Your Modem 



kYou may not realize it, but you can talk directly to your mo- 
, denn in Its own language. Give it the right commands, and it 

■ will dial your phone, answer incoming calls, and do just 
about everything else in between. 

Human-to-modem communication is simplified by the 
fact that almost all PC modems speak the same language 
(with minor variations), a lingo based on commands origi- 
nated by modem manufacturer Hayes. This language is ap- 
propriately called the Hayes command set 

As you might suspect, your modem has to know the 
difference between when you Ye talking to It and when 
. you're talking to a computer at the other end of the line. To 

■ keep these two situations straight, all Hayes-compatible 
modems have two operating modes: command, in which 
you can issue commands to the modem, and data, in which 
the modem simply sends what you type over the phone 
line. 

\ The best way to get your feet wet with modem talk is to 
! njn your telecommunications program and enter its terminal 
mode. In this mode, as long as you're not connected to an- 
other computer, you'll be in command mode, and whatever 
you type will go directly to the modem. 

Although the Hayes manual lists nearly 15 pages of 
commands, there are really just 10 essentials. Master 
I these, and you're on your way to being a modem expert. 

AT Type AT to grab your modem's attention. You precede 
almost every Hayes command with an AT. Type it now, fol- 
lowed by Enter. (You follow all AT commands with Enter, 
just the way you do DOS commands.) Your modem should 
respond with the message OK, It's worth mentioning that 
some modems require that you enter commands tn upper- 
case; others aren't so choosy. 

A Sets the modem to answer mode. If you're talking with a 
friend and you want to switch to computer communication, 
one of you types ATA, the other types ATD, and your PCs 
will take over. Before this magic can happen, however, you 
need to make sure that both communclations programs are 
set with the same parameters and that the modems for 
botii computers are connected through the phones. 

DT This is the main touch-tone dialing command. To call 
|ia^567. you'd type ATDT1 234567. If you don't have a 
pouch-tone phone, use DP, for Dial Pulse. 

' , The comma pauses for the number of seconds specified 
in register S8 (see below). This command is handy if you're 
dialing from a switchboard system, like those found in ho- 
tels, that can't handle numbers as fast as your modem rods 

; them out. 



H Hang up. If you've had it, ATH is the command to use. I 

In This is the speaker's loudness. Values for n are 0, 1 
(low), 2 (medium), and 3 (high). If you want your modem to 
annoy as many people as possible at the office, use ATL3. 

Mn Controls your modem's speaker, with values for n of 
(off), 1 (on when dialing), 2 (always on), and 3 (on after carri- 
er detected). To turn your speaker off, for example, type 

ATMO. 

-f- + + When you're connected to another computer, you're 
in data mode, and the characters you type go directly to the 
other computer; they aren't considered commands by your . 
modem. If you type AT in data mode, for example, your 
computer will simply send the characters A and 7 to the oth- 
er end of the line, lb get your modem's attention back | 
again, type + + *f , without a preceding AT and without ' 
pressing Enter. Your modem will respond with OK, Now 
you can enter any commands you wish. To return to data 
mode and talk to the other computer again, type ATO. i 

Sn S stands for Store and denotes one of the Hayes regis- 
ters. There are 16 of these, and although each is interesting ; 
in its own way. you'll probably use only two; S8 and S1 1 . 
The value in S8 tells the modem the number of seconds to 
pause for a comma. ATS8=3 pauses for three seconds at 'i 
every comma. 81 1 is a real sleeper. It controls dialing 
speed (in milliseconds). To make your modem dial like a de- 
mon, try ATS1 1 = 55 (smaller numbers make for faster i 
dialing). 1 

Z Resets the registers to their default values. If your modem * 
starts misbehaving, ATZ is a gentle slap in its face. | 

After you've tried a few of these commands, you may 
want to look at your terminal program's configuration op- 
tions. Most programs let you send a command string to the 
modem. Take advantage of this to make your modem loud- ' 
er or silent or to dial in a blur of speed. 

You can also configure your modem by issuing com- 
mands directly from the DOS prompt or from a batch file. 
First, open a COM port with the MODE command; then 
send the commands to your modem with an ECHO state- 
ment. Here's a short batch file that tells your modem to dial j 
the phone at warp factor 5. 

MODECOM1:1200,n,8,1 
ECHOATS11=55>COM1: 



That's it. Modem power in a nutshell. 



—CUFTOW KARNES 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 33 



# TEST LAB 



HAYES JT FAX 4800 
PORTABLE 



Hayes, the standard-bearer for 
PC modem products, brings 
its considerable expertise to 
bear on the JT Fax 4800 Por- 
table. I've evaluated several PC fax 
products over the last year, and the JT 
Portable is, without a doubt, the easi- 
est to set up, configure, and operate. 
What's more, its portabiUty lets you 
take your fax capability on the road. 
Instalhng the JT Portable is sim- 
pHcity itself. Connect the box to an 
open COM port using the standard se- 
rial cable, plug in your telephone line 
as directed, and plug the power supply 
into the wall. That takes care of the 
hardware. To install the software, in- 
sert the Program/Utility disk (one 
disk for 3V2-inch drives, two disks for 
5 '/4-inch drives) and type InstalL The 
self-running installation and configu- 
ration program will have you ready to 
send your first fax (your warranty reg- 
istration) within i 5 minutes. 

The JT Portable works best with 
ASCII text files; however, you can fax 
documents straight from your word 
processor using the JT's Application 
Capture option. If you configure your 
word processor to send its document 
to an Epson MX-compatible printer, 
the JT will capture the print job and 
route it to a receiving fax machine. 
You'll almost always be better off 
using Application Capture for sending 
a fax. The JT won't send graphics 
from any application, but it will con- 
vert its fax files from and to PC Paint- 
brush files (PCX) so that you can 
transmit and receive letterhead and 
signatures, for example. 

As a receiver, the JT works ex- 
tremely well. Faxes are captured and 
stored automatically and can be print- 
ed on plain paper (a great advantage 
over stand-alone machines using ther- 
mal paper). I experienced no prob- 
lems printing a one-page fax on an HP 
LaserJet-compatible printer. 



n 



Installation: external 
Slot/Bus Required: n/a 
Fax Group Supported: 3 
Other Requirements: 640K RAM 
List Price: $199.00 

HAYES MICROCOMPUTER PRODUCTS 
5835 Peachtree Corners E 
Norcross, GA 30092 
(404) 449-8791 



While the JT Portable has 
a lot to recommend it, there are a 
few disadvantages. One, the software 
is memory resident. You'll have to 
check for possible conflict with other 
TSRs. This also precludes the use of 
the JT Portable with such memory- 
manipulative software as Windows. 
Also, if you run into trouble (a bad 
connection, for example), it'sdifficuh 
to regain control of your system for an 
exit or reboot. Finally, the JT is a fax 
system only — it doesn't double as a 
modem. 

On the whole, the JT Portable of- 
fers flexibility as a trade for full stand- 
alone fax machine functionality. But 
it's a trade worth considering if you're 
in the market for a PC fax device. [> 

PETER SCISCX) 




Fax Facts 

The sidebars "Fax Groupies/' 'The 
Rrst Fax Machine/' and "Xerox Fax 
Firsts" are from David Day's Facsimile 
Facts & Figures, 1990/91. The book is 
avaifable for $69.95 plus $9.00 shipping 
and handlmg from the fnternationai Fac- 
simile Association, 4023 Lakeview 
Drive, Lake Havasu City, Arizona 86403; 
(602)453-5330. 



I 



34 



COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



WOULDNT IT BE NICE IF PROBLEMS COULD BE FOUND. . . 



MS-DOS AND Windows are great 

OPERATING SYSTEMS, BUT THEY DO HAVE 
ONE AWFUL THING IN COMMON - THE 
PERSONAL COMPUTER. 

Because of the many different hardware and 
software configurations possible, if something 
can go wrong, it will, 

...Usually 11:00 at night ...on a Saturday. 

Be prepared for those inevitable system conflicts 
with System Sleuth Pro™ / System Sleuth 
Analyzer" for MS-DOS and WinSleuth' for 
Windows 3.0 

System Sleuth Pro and System Sleuth Analyzer 
are the logical extensions of our highly-regarded 
System Sleuth passive analysis program. With an 
ALL NEW drop-down menu interface and 
sizable windows, a wealth of hardware and 
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A number of feature enhancements make System 
Sleuth Pro and System Sleuth Analyzer 
indispensible parts of your repair toolkit. 

Having difficulties installing a new sound board, 
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"PC Magazine Editor's pick,., the 33 best 
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PC Magazine, June 26, 1990 




INSTALLATION ASSISTANT can help locate 
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System Sleuth Pro has extensive hardware 
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board components, RAM and more. 




6945 Hermosa Circle • Buena Park, CA 90620 

MS-DOS and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corp, 



WinSleuth takes a 'Windows eye-view' of your 
system. Are you really are out of memory, or is 
Windows allocating your RAM resources to 
non-essential applications? Why does your 
brand new graphics printer refuse to graph? Is 
your system optimally set up for Windows 
operation? WinSleuth can shed light on all of 

•'WinSleuth should be dubbed 'Solutionware'" 
Paul Bonner, PC Computing, January, 1991 



ptes Help Modules 



^^sbSbss!^— 



Tun 



o 



ss 



cS 



cS 



The "\ri2ff*ti" pdsmrtei n yiu S'l^TEM \H\ tit eAm doet k)< emt or k ^^vt lo a vaJja v*ich 
dxt riot iMw*\/^fvJo>m to tvn nwd d'licieniV SeMing Hit pafame<ei lo 4 mcr6«r cl ttoJ. 30 vd 
jflcw Wfxtowi 10 lun m«ft efhciftTtV Tom^e**t thjri^LiseH^ViivkwiNot«padippk«iori 
lo etif Ihe SYST EM m\ iki ard n«v« So the wction iSlandafd] and add (ct ehinoej d Ino to fMd 
Snf2SF*H"30 \ou ^ reed lo eat *id rttlflrl Wrttowj ta «k change to (aJto e«ecl Thb cKsnge 
^p*ob*b^ro(welodvned^ycu«ew»i9arelt^3rk«ihW#id(jwf [nerosecaswDOHOT make 
iHj change, 

The 1r«29D*car' DV«ne<« v^ vou SYSTEM INI N« erihs doet no« e)«< or is »( U) 4 v4^ 
doet rot A)w Wnctom K> nn nost ethcientV S«Aing thq pa«neler lo FALSE wi «•;>*« Wndcpm 
Iq \n meie d1)C«ntV To m^e »« charvo wfl ihfl Wndow Htjiepsd dt«ttfltmto ed<l*» 
SYSTEM IHI fie jnd mov* lo M wcton t»e£nh| and «a (Of cKrgel line to read 
N28Dic.^-fALS£ YouMinMdtattdmdfestaftWfxloiHtlcilhachvQetoUiieeKta The 
chA^geapiobat]^r«tMtt«^viH<j<V(>j»eutrigdne»iwA*^Wmd]vq: In Ihote C4iies 00 
hOT malifl itiQ dwoe 

DtiJj^ pakiB>«K« can be erihanced uiJrt-ifihfl^ by LEUig (he d* Mc^ 
£Hj^TDW»ar»oflTe*Wridowicoriipjltte[*skwi:*»^piod^ SMAaTDRVbpiwdHJ tiy 
McTOsdt on yoj Wrdowi 4t>j end Ihe Wndovrt Setup pro^wi »t se(x« ths iMt? rH m^iie the 
neCcTUrycharoettoyoL* t^«is«f'n )f>«uopllor anatenaledd^cadwigprtxli^be tue'O 
Icbw ihe rt$^dfatcn inttojctoru tHretiJ^ 



In 3rd« ta maftMt ammttri 
ngJmtotm Thscanbe 
n^iry of the wletr «v4M>le (M 



i H r«ccR«wmded that hard dk^t be oftmavi on « 
uing OTIC d the deJtatrwilalon kAiCin tickidtd Mih 



these questions in an easy-to-use menu and icon- 
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All of our products are equipped with extensive 
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Learn more about hovt^ the DTG team can rnake 
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(714)994-7400 FAX; (714) 994-7410 
By the way ... isn't tomorrow "Saturday? 

BiFOKTHEV FOUND you? 

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Circte Raader Service Number 196 



# TEST LAB 



HAYES JT FAX 9600B 



ror the most part, a modem/fax 
board eliminates the bulk and bad 
paper associated with fax ma- 
chines. As wonderful as they are, 
fax machines can take up valuable 
space; and many people dislike having 
to cope with loading paper, clearing 
paper jams, and handling flimsy pa- 
per. A modem/fax device, on the oth- 
er hand, fits neatly and discreetly into 
an expansion slot on your PC and al- 
lows you to print documents on your 
choice of printer paper. 

The Hayes JT Fax 9600B covers 
all the advantages (no bulk, endless 
software applications) and disad- 
vantages (you have to buy a scanner 
to transmit copies of physical 
documents). 

Essentially techno-shy, I found 
the Hayes JT Fax 9600B mercifully 
easy to install. Just uncover the ex- 
pansion slots, press it in, and plug in a 
couple of phone wires. The only dis- 
advantage that I discovered was the 
size of the modem attached to the fax 
board. On my IBM XT compatible, I 
found it necessary to leave the expan- 
sion slot open next to it to make room 
for its bulk. 

The software included in the 
package made sending and receiving 
fax transmissions as easy as selecting 
from a series of clear options. It 
would've been nice to have seen a 
menu appear when the program came 
up rather than having to press a hot 
key, though offering a menu might 
nullify the advantage of leaving the 
program in the background for use at 
any time. Displaying and printing re- 
ceived faxes was no problem, and en- 
largements were amazingly crisp. The 
user's guide provided clear illustra- 
tions and instructions, though I found 
it skimpily indexed. 

The Hayes JT Fax 9600B may 
not be quite as convenient in some re- 
spects as an actual fax machine, but it 
makes up for the minor inconven- 
iences with its size and flexibility. ^ 



RAM I 



Installation: Internal 
Slot/Bus Required: d-bit 
Fax Group Supported: 3 
Other Requirements: 640K 
List Price: $499.00 

HAYES MICROCOMPUTER PRODUCTS 
5835 Peachtree Corners E 
Norcross, GA 30092 
(404) 449-8791 




EDDIE HUFFM,^N 

36 COMPUTE 




JULY 1991 



How this $149 software will: 

1) Improve the way you work and thinkl 

2) Instantly find the info you need, and 

3) Help you make brilliant decisions ... 






The next generation 
[TORNADO 



of 



.%.^; 



Surprisinijiy, there is a whole new 
world of uses for your compuier! 
You c;ui use your compuier to de;i] 
with al) the countless bils of "random" 
mformation scattered across your desk: 
plans, notes, Usts, actions, contacts, ideas. 



Info Select 




and much more. INFO SELECT'^' will 
not only give you instant access to this 
important information ,.. it will help you 
make better decisions and see imptirtant 
new rciation ships. Try INFO SELECT 
risk- free and di seen or u w hole new 
d i me ns i on of ct>m pu t i ng . 

Photographic 
memory 

INFO SELECT is like having a 
'photographic memory* that gives you 
perfect supcrfast recall of up to 64.1)00 
items of information. 

Telephone notes 

When Harry calls you on the phone, 
you'll display the six windows on Harry 
before he Hnishes his ftrst semence! No 
more embarrassing pauses or scrambling 
for information. 

INFO 
SELECralso 
includes the 
world's finit 
"3-D" word 
pnK'essor. 
You'll be 
amazed at how it 
works. 

Instead of 
one window or 
ten, imagine up to 64,000! The uses ure 
endless. 




]NFOSRlJ:rTistiLs>' 
lo use - yei powerful. 



Are you forgetful? 

Were you born with a memory 
shuated squarely on the tip of your 
tongue? Do you forget things like which 
day you placed an order or important 
numbers? If you are forgetful you 
especially need INFO SELECT - the 
software that remembers almost 
everything for you. 

Thinking tool 

Have you e^er worked on a complex 
project and felt lost? With INFO 
SELECT you'll gn^iup. scan, and cross 
search through all your notes so fast 
you'll sec the big piciurc in seconds. 

Will I be better off doing this now or 
that later? Keeping priorities straight can 
make or break your career or your 
business. INFO SELECT lets yoti keep 
on lop of what's hot. 

Should you use an east or west coast 
supplier? To make decisions you need 
facts. Now you can view the facts any 
way you like ... as fast as you can think. 
You'll make the best decisions ever - 
and fewer expensive mistakes. 




ii^ione ntAcs. 




CIit:ni info 



The #1 PIM 

What's all the fuss 

aNuji PIMs (Personal 

Information 

Mangers)? 

Simple - you 

probably have 

more RANDOM 

infomialion than 

any other type and 

you need a PIM to 

properly handle 

this kind of 

information. The 

right PIM will 

save you time and 

make everything 

yc^u do go 

simx^thly. 

Why is Info 

Select the #1 PIM? 

Because Info Select is based 

on ideas you can identify 

with - like stacks of paper. 

And it's free-fonn tOi>. You 
won't waste days or weeks learning 
complex structures. Instead you'll be up 
and running in minutes. Info Select also 
docs more and costs less than other PIMs. 





Owners t)f mir TORNADO ioflwjire (synibiili/fd 

by tlic fiitrious 'blue loniado") can inidc up id the 

sccond-ij;cncratiori Into Select under our ^p<5Cial 

offer. There are o\er 200 impn)veiTvenis. 

Feature packed 

INFO SELECT is memorv rcsident 
(if you choose), so you can quickly jump 
in from other programs. Info Select 
windows can hold: notes, plans, lists, 
facts, letters, contacts, and much more. 
You can search for a window or a group 
of windows rebted by a word or phrase. 
There are five ways to see overviews: 
hypertext, a fast sort, and line drawing. 
Save time with the dialer, dale tickler; 
and searching by text or date ranges. 

Info Select allows 

•y * — -T^^^ — I you to: add 

columns of 
numbers; store 
data in EMS; use 
template or 
frce-lbmi 
windows; import 
and export files, 
screens, and 
databases; move, 
join, and duplicate 
windows and 
much more. 




II you hiive notes, ideas, onniatls 
or nihcr unoj^ani/cd RANIX)M 
in for ma lion, you need Info fekti: 




Manageineni 



szr; P PCM 





l!!MVJI!IJ 



■Rarely do I 
recommend a 
product as 
wholeheartedly' 
David Han^ey, 
Com p. Shopper 



'8edt3 the pants 
off just about 
everything else," 
Jeffrey Parker, 
PCM 



'As easy as 
remembering 
your own name." 
Patrick Marshall, 
inio Woild 



Editor's Choice 
"First rate" 
PC Magazine 



UVN 
option 

The new LAN version allows 
i n teg rated E- ma i I . sha r i ng com pany 
rolodexes and distribufing company 
policies. You can share atiy kind of 
infomiation. It's your first step into the 
exciting new world of groupware! Ask 
about the five node LAN starter pack. 

Easy power 

Info Select is easy to use yet offers 
the pcnver ytnj need w ith infobases up lo 
10 megabytes; text seiirches up to 
700kb/sec; up to .'^2,000 characters per 
window; ;)nd up to 64,0G() windows per 
tnfobase. Even better. Info Select can 
swap down to as little as 7K memoryf 

TORNADO owners 

INIO SELECT is based on the 
pioneering TORNADO™ software PC 
Worid called "Excellent, Excellent, 
Excellent, Excellent" and PC Magazine 
awarded Editor's Choice - twice. Call 
about our special trade-up offer. 






is here at 
last! 



%/^^ 



IK^ 



>n:o. 



% 



't>y<^2 



%\ 



\ 



Endless 
uses 

Info Select can 
do much more than manage 
all your RANDOM 
infomiation. Use it to 
manage business correspondence, sales 
leads, orders, and client notes. Track 
facts, plan projects, or interrcJate all your 
ideas. You can catalogue parts, 
documents, and inventory items. Match 
buyers and sellers or doctors and patients. 
Setup an information desk. Edit E-mail. 
Store notes on magazine articles, 
software operation techniques, or just 
names and addresses. Whether you are a 
lawyer tracking court ca.ses or a zoologist 
collecting fcYding liabits you'll find 
count les-s uses for Info Select. 




Info Select keeps your infomialion in jmelligetit 
;iiUomuiically positioned windows. 



Risk-Free Guarantee 

Info Select is m cffeclive you will bo 

uiTUtifCtl /Hv a! 's wh y wc offer cm r 

morwy-hack ^.^luriinleL'. Try it foi "S^\ diiys. 

If yo«an: not roily satisfied, aca^pi our lull 

prompt refund. Could any offer be more 

fair? 



All for just ^^^. 

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iNFQ SELECT has a special price of 
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Doesn't it make sense to get the 
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y ou r CO m p u I e r? Order today . Call 
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POB 70, Dept, 601 

Hacks nsack, NJ 07602 

(800) 342-5930 (201) 342-651 S 

Fax: (201) 342-0370 



Makers of: Tornado. Info Select, 
Key Watch & hAicro Cfiaris 



MAIL QR O^RS: Send name, address, phone number, and payment by check. Visa, or MC lo aildmss ihown. Please include S3, 50 shippinij (Si 5 outside comincnial USA). KIJROPKAN CUSTOMERS: 
Contact Ailanicx U.S.A. (203) 655-6931). IHADEMARKJij: Trademark (owner): Tornado, Info Select. Key Waic!i (Micro l^igic), IBM PC. XT, AT. PS/2 (IBM). © 1990 Micro Logic Corp. U.S. A, 



# TEST LAB 



SATISFAXTION 



For a friendly fax that won*t take 
up room on your desk and for re- 
ceiving faxes as images that can be 
stored and manipulated by your 
computer, you'd be hard-pressed to 
find something simpler to install or 
easier to use than SatisFAXtion, 

The full-length 16-bit board is in- 
stalled in a couple of minutes (al- 
though it's a 16-bit board, it will work 
in an 8-bit slot). It has no jumpers or 
switches to set. Once it's in, the only 
thing left to think about is the 
software. 

You can send faxes from either 
Windows or DOS. For Windows- 
based transmission, the program sup- 
ports Faxit (which isn't included, 
although you get a coupon for a free 
copy). There are two options for send- 
ing faxes from DOS. You can create a 
text file and then use the command 
COPY TEXTFILE LPT3 to send the 
fax (it invokes a pop-up program 
called FaxFopX or you can print the 
file from within the program (any pro- 
gram) to LPT 3. LPT3 is the fax board; 
you can easily change the port to 
LPTl for programs that can't print to 
alternative printer ports. LPT3, inci- 
dentally, emulates an Epson dot- 
matrix printer. 

Keep up to 1000 fax numbers on 
file in your online telephone book for 
automatic dialing from the pop-up 
program. By using a feature called 
grouping in the telephone book and a 
special fax process called polling, you 
can automatically send up to 100 
faxes, one to each of the numbers in a 
group. If your word processor allows 
you to change your printer setting 
from within the program, you could 
also print directly from your word 
processor to the fax Une. 

At first, the board fought with my 
mouse for dominance of the serial 
port, but by telling the installation 
program that I had no mouse (I lied), 
I was able to gel the data-modem part 
of the board to cooperate. 

The card is equipped with an in- 

38 COMPUTE 




Installation: internal 
Slot/Bus Required: 8-bit or 16-bit 
Fax Group Supported: 3 
Other Requirements: 640K RAM; MDA, CGA, 
EGA, VGA, or Hercules; hard disk; mouse rec- 
ommended if used with Windows 
List Price: $499.00 ($549.00 for microchannei) 

INTEL 

C03-07 

5200 NE Elam Young Pkwy. 

Hillsboro, OR 97124 

(800) 538-3373 




put for an optional 
hand scanner that would 
enable you to fax directly from 
gray-scale images. Unfortunately, it has 
a proprietary connection, so only the 
Intel scanner can be plugged into it 



OCR software is also avail- 
able. Neither of these were provided 
with the review unit. Qearly, this fax 
board from Intel has much to offer, 
including an abundance of usefiil fea- 
tures, superior ease of use and instal- 
lation, and a very good manual.i> 

ROBERT BDCBY 



Fetch That Fax 



It used to be easy to have Rover fetch your 
morning paper. Nowadays, he may have to 
learn to use a fax machine first. Fax de- 
vices have become so commonplace 
they're beginning to replace more conven- 
tional distribution channels. 

An excellent example of this is FAX 
TRACK Computers, a computer news daily 
distributed by fax, 

FAX TFiACK works like this: Each day's 
computer news is condensed into one 
page of executive summaries covering 
hardware, software, company earnings, 
and other related topics and faxed to 



subscribers by 6:00 a,m- For more infor- 
mation on any topic, you can call a toll-free 
number and have a detailed story faxed 
back to you. 

If you're traveling, give the company 
your hotel's fax number and receive FAX 
TRACK at your destination. 

FAX TFW^K Computers is available for 
$47.90 per month or $527.00 per year from 
Inlex, 4099 McEwen Road, Suite 350, Dal- 
las, Texas 75244; (800) 800^994. If you'd 
like to give FAX TRACK a try, a special five- 
day free trial is avaiJable. 

—CLIFTON KARNES 



JULY 1991 



I CALL 
ITOILFREE: 



(800)345-5568 



MACRONIX, INC. 



mm ir MaxFax 

9624 

FAX/MODEM CARD 

• Powerful, intelligent, Group 3 9600 bps Fax 

& Hayes compatible 2400 bps Modemn Card. 

• Unique Auto Direct compatibility 

• Background and "Unattended" operation 

• Dedicated On-Board Microprocessor & 
powerful software package 

• Supports several popular printer and 
page scanners 

• Easy to install and setup 

• Compatible with IBM PC, XT, AT, PS/2 
Model 30, Compaq Deskpro 386 and all 
other IBM compatible PCs. 
Compact half-card 
size to fit 
most portable 
& laptops 



$ 



12^ 




Egarstekl 128 

Hand Scanner 

• Perfect Scanning Width & Highest 
Scanning Speed! 

• Enables you to import directly into most 
desktop publishing software 

• Allows you to scan text files directly into 
many OCR software 

Complete Package includes,., 

• Mars 128 5" Scanner & Interface Card 

• Scan Kit Utility Software & User's Manual 

• Cat Reader OCR Software 

& PC Paintbrush Plus <tf| C/QC 

• One Year Warranty nP O X ^ *! 





The MousePen 

Works like a mouse, shaped and held 
like a pen! Uses existing drivers in 
Windows® and works with Microsoft 
or IBM OS/2 drivers. Includes... 

• Microsoft Connpatible Driver 
• Menu Maker utility software for 
\ non-mouse applications 
\ • TelePAINT® color paint program 
\ with VGA support 

• IBM PS/2 Uouseport Connector 
• Adapter for DB9 and DB25 
seriafports 

• 5-1/4" & 3-1/2" diskettes 
• User's Manual 
• Custom 

Pen Holder t T C7QQ 





00** fiiio^ 



IBM PS/2 MEMORy 



SIMM MODULES 



CAt I DESCRIPTION NSI 

30F534B 51 ^Ka Upgf acJe PS/2 30 2S6 44.00 

30F5360 2MB Upgrade PS/2 30 286 1 28.00 

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6450603 1 MB SIMM PS/2 70-E6t ; 1 21 66.00 

6450604 2M8 SIMM PS/2 50Z 70 106.00 
6450608 2MB SIMM PS/2 70 •A21 128.00 
34F2933 4MB SIMM PS/2 55SX:65SX 279,00 
5450375 1MB Mem BD PS/2 80-041 96.00 
6450379 2MBM&mBD PS/2 80 111-321 158 00 



CAT. t DESCRIPT. 

6451060 4M8 Mem,8D PS/2 60-A21 :A31 

64S0605 2-8M B Xpand Mem. PS/2 70460 

w/2MB 
34F3077 2-14MB Xpaod BD. PS/2 70480 

W/2MB 
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W/2M8 

CALL FOR PS/1 MEMORY 



NSI 
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256x8 
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15,00 17,00 19.00 

17.00 19.00 21.00 

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80 

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259,00 279.00 309.00 

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150 120 100 SO 70 60 

64x1 ,90 1.20 1.50 

64x4 2.00 2.15 

256x1 1.25 1.40 1,60 1.85 

256x4 500 5.25 5.60 6,25 7,50 

IMBkI 4.75 5,00 5.35 6.00 7.00 



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# TEST LAB 



III 



OKITEL 24 
PC MODEM 



There are three questions I ask 
when Tm shopping for a modem 
card. Will it be easy to install, 
does it have all of the features I 
need, and will it perform over a rea- 
sonable period of lime without fail- 
ure? After putting this Okitel 2400B 
Plus through some paces, I can answer 
all three questions with a most defi- 
nite Yes. 

This modem occupies a full-sized 
expansion card. That tells me several 
things. Most important, it indicates 
that the design engineers didn't cut 
any corners to save money on produc- 
tion costs. It also means that the com- 
ponents won*t overheat since there's 
plenty of space between them. And if 
repairs are ever necessary, a techni- 
cian will have an easier time finding 
problems. Considering the quality en- 
gineering, I figure this modem will 
outlast most of the others that I've 
seen and used. 

Installing a modem card can be 
frustrating, but the Okitel's documen- 
tation is clear and well illustrated. 
Knowing precisely where to look and 
what to do helped immensely because 
I had to change some jumpers on the 
modem card so that it wouldn't con- 
flict with my other serial devices. 

The default settings of my termi- 
nal program, ProConim Plus, didn*t 
work. Here again, fixing these types of 
problems can be a hassle. But it wasn't. 
I read through the documentation, 
easily found the information that I 
needed, and set the ProComm Plus 
modem specifications. From then 
on, my telecommunicatons went 
smoothly. 

And last but not least, this mo- 
dem, being Hayes compatible, has all 
of the features I need. Not only did 
ProComm work fine, but so did other 
programs that I use, such as Telix and 
Windows Terminal 

The folks at Okidata were kind 



PLUS 



Installation: internaf 
Slot/Bus Required: 8-bit 
Other Requirements: n/a 
List Price: $389.00 

OKIDATA 

532 Fellowship Rd. 
Mount Laurel, NJ 08054 
(609) 235-2600 




enough to provide telecom- 
munications software. It's good 

enough to get started with, but you'll 
want to find something else if you 
want a full- featured program. 



After using the Okitel 2400B 
Plus PC modem, Fd recommend it to 
anyone. It's a quality modem card 
that has excellent documentation and 
carries all of the features you need, o 

RICHARD C LEINECKER 



The First Fax Machine 



The first primitive facsimiie machine was in- 
vented by Dr. Aiexander Bain, a Scottish 
physicist, in 1 842. This may come as a sur- 
prise to the many peopie who had oniy 
heard of facsimile during the fax explosion 
of the past five years. 

Dr. Bain's early effort was developed 
even iDefore the invention of the telephone 
by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, It had a 
pendulum which created a brown stain as it 
swung across chemicalJy treated paper. 

It is interesting to note that both of 
these pioneers were of Scottish origin. 
Bell's U.S. Patent became the most valu- 
able ever— and hetd by a foreigner! Howev- 
er, he did become an American citizen in 



1882. Although Bell's life work, even apart 
from the telephone, is well documented up 
to his death in 1922, Alexander Bain's con- 
tribution to facsimile is little known. It is the 
author's sincere hope, that as the facsimile 
industry continues its meteorical rise, the 
work of its inventor, Dr. Alexander Bain, will 
not be forgotten. 

Dr. Bain's device was called the Elec- 
tronrrechanicaf Recording Telegraph, and 
although today it may not be considered to 
have t)een a commercial success, little or 
no attempts were made to market the de- 
vice at that time, — david day 

Facsimile Facts A Figures. 1990/97 
Internatikxia! Facsimife Association 



40 



COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



TANDY FAXMATE 



rax communication is a fast and ef- 
ficient variation on conventional 
information exchange. Trading the 
slow pace of mail or express deliv- 
ery services for instantaneous world- 
wide communication, it offers good 
speed but poor-quality paper, few ma- 
chine language barriers but some 
document-form limitations. 

The Tandy FaxMate is an appro- 
priately fast and efficient fax board 
that lets you send and receive facsimi- 
les from your PC Offering few frills, 
easy use, and mediocre onscreen re- 
production, it simply gets the job done. 

The FaxMate is easy to install: 
Remove your PCs cover, snap the fax 
board into a slot, and plug in a couple 
of phone cords. Its software is similar- 
ly easy to install and use, providing 
clear instructions and, for the most 
part, easily followed paths to any field, 
whether sending a fax or altering the 
current setup (I was caught off guard, 
though, when its automatic receive 
function kicked in unexpectedly). 

With automatic setup of files for 
received faxes and steps that walk you 
through setting up a cover sheet and 
sending a document, the FaxMate 
does most of the hard work for you. It 
automatically redials if it gets a busy 
signal when sending, and it allows for 
automatic transmission to different 
machines during low-rate times. 

Though designed to oj^erate with 
the DeskMate software program, the 
fax board and accompanying software 
work fine on their own. The only sub- 
stantial complaint I had was with on- 
screen reproduction of received 
documents. When the documents 
show up onscreen, they're illegibly re- 
duced. And for all the software's 
zooming and half-sizing capabilities, 
making a document readable on- 
screen takes a lot of doing. However, 
the FaxMate readily prints clear, full- 
sized fax documents. And you enjoy 
the speed and convenience of working 
from your computer. > 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 




Installation: internal 

Slot/Bus Required: 8-bit 

Fax Group Supported: 3 

Other Requirements: 640K RAM; hard disk with at 

least 3MB available; SVz- or SV^-inch floppy disk 

drive; SO-column monitor with CGA, EGA, VGA, 

Tandy 16-color, Hercules, or compatible graphics; 

MS-DOS version 3.1 or higher 

List Price: $249.95 

RADIO SHACK 
A Division of Tandy 
700 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 
(817) 878-4969 




JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 4f 



SINCE 1979 



UNBEATABLE PRICES ^^^pu^er direct s ^ . _ - - 
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139 



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MODEMS 

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COMPUTER DIRECT, INC. 

22292 N. Pepper Rood 
Bdiringlon, It 60010 

'We Love Our Customers' 



Ciiclo Reader Service Number 114 



# TEST LAB 



WORLDPORT 2400 MODEM 



The Touchbase Systems World Port 
Hayes-compatible modem is 
small — about the size of a pack of 
cigarettes— but topnotch. It at- 
taches externally to the computer 
through the serial port and can be 
powered by a standard nine-volt bat- 
tery, an AC adapter, or the computer 
itself It connects to the phone line 
either through its modular phone jack 
or by means of an acoustic coupler. 

The WorldPort cannot connect 
directly with some computers because 
it requires a 25-pin serial port. But an 
appropriate adapter cable, such as the 
DB9-DB25, will take care of that. 

The modem gets its power direct- 
ly from some computers, but not all. 
Using an alkaline battery as an alter- 
native will maintain power for about 
six hours of continuous use. The unit 
also comes with an AC adapter. You 
switch the modem on and off using 
your communications software. 

A phone jack on the modem's 
side connects directly to the telephone 
line running from your wall. There's 
only one jack on the modem, so to use 
your phone along with the modem, 
make sure the modem is either at the 
end of a daisychain or plugged into a 
Y-connector at the wall jack. An alter- 
native to directly connecting the mo- 
dem to the phone line is plugging it 
into an acoustic coupler using an 
adapter cable provided in the package. 

The WoridPort worked well with 
each commercial or public-domain 
telecommunications program 1 tried 
at the modem's three speeds of 300, 
1200, and 2400 bits per second. And, 
in case you lack such software, the 
unit comes with a powerful communi- 
cations package — Carbon Copy. 

The WorldPort is a very nice 
piece of equipment — easy to use, reli- 
able, and well documented. The only 
thing preventing me from rushing out 
to buy one for myself is the whopping 
$359 price tag. Of course, you can ex- 
pect the street price to be lower. t> 

BRUCE M. BOWDEN 



Installation: external 

Slot/Bus Required: n/a 

Other Requirements: Any computer with 

an RS-232 port and the ability to accept 

the Hayes AT command set 

List Price: $359.00 

TOUCHBASE SYSTEMS 

160 Laurel Ave. 

Northport, NY 1 1 768 ^^^ 

(516) 261-0423 ^W^W*^ 




BitSi Baud, and CPS 



Bits Per Second (bps). The number of 
data bits the modem is capable of transmit- 
ting each second. 

Data Bits, The number of bits transmitted 
for each byte of data. Seven-bit characters 
usually represent the 128 standard ASCII 
characters; 8-bit characters can represent 
control characters and special token or 
graphics characters. 

Baud Rate. The number of times per sec- 
ond a signal in a communications channel 
varies or changes states. This doesn't nec- 
essarily translate to bps. 

Multiple-State Modulation. This method 



allows multiple bits to be sent with each 
baud. 

Characters Per Second (cps). The num- 
ber of characters transmitted by a modem 
in a second. 



Medium- and high-speed modems use 
baud rates lower than their bps rates by 
employing multiple-state modulation. For 
example. 1200-bps modems that conform 
to the Bell 21 2A standard (which includes 
most 1200'bps modems used in the U.S.) 
operate at 300 baud and use a modulation 
technique called phase modulation that 
transmits four bits per baud. 

—MICHAEL A. BANKS 



44 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




First of all, we tested the specific features and capabilities of this month's communications 
devices. While this (<ind of Information routinely appears in advertisements and manuals, 
our tests allowed us to thoroughly check out these features and capabilities. 

In addition, we ran a series of pass/fail tests to determine tiiat each device did In fact 
function as the manufacturer indicated it would. Testing modems and fax units presents 
some interesting challenges. Because communications devices must, to a large extent, 
conform to industry standards in order to do what tiiey do. a comparison of numerical 
benchmark results would not yield statistically significant information. Therefore, a pass/fail 
system was adopted, and each of the communications devices passed our rigorous tests. 

Modem Testing 

To test this month's modems, the lab used a 24£X)-baud Hayes-compatible external mo- 
dem connected via the serial port to an IBM AT (6MHe). Using ProComm Plus communica- 
tions software (parameters: 2400, N, 8, 1) and the SuperKermit file-transfer protocol, the 
lab sent and received the following test files: 



Fife Name 

SRMDGO. IMG 

SOFTWARETEX 

WATERFALPCX 

MEMCHK.COM 

QICOM 

4000AS.TXT 



File DBScription 
bitmap graphics 
ASCII text file 
PC Paintbrush file 
command program 
command program 
ASCII alignment text file 



File Name 

BUSY.EXE 

GAN.TIF 

PRINTER.EXX; 

SAY.EXE 

V01CE.V3S 

WINDLjOGO.GEM 



File Description 
executable program 
TIFF scanned-lmage file 
ASCII extended characters 
executable sound program 
digital sound file 
GEM vector graphics file 



The lab installed the test modem eitiier externally or internally on an 80386 SX 
(1 6MH2). Additional hardware consisted of a TLS-3 line simulator, an FTS-80 modem/fax 
test set, and a proprietary multilevel line noise/signal impairment generator unit. Ail off- 
hook meter readings and test levels were calibrated and confirmed using a standard 
AT & T 2500 Touch-Tone telephone set. Test files were sent and received using "clean" 
simulator conditions, as well as impairment levels 1 through 4. These impairment levels 
mimic problematic line conditions you might encounter in your everyday electronic commu- 
nications. The tab ran executable and program files at tiie end of each test cycle and com- 
pared file sizes. To confirm the integrity of the file transfer, tiie lab displayed text and 
graphics files. 

Fax Testing 

The lab used the manufacturer's proprietary software for all testing. For all fax-transmis- 
sion testing, tiie lab used several test files (supported by the hardware/software): 



File Name 
SF^UOGO.IMG 
SOFTWARETEX 
WATERFALPCX 



File Description 
bitmap graphics 
ASCII text file 
PC Paintbrush file 



File Name 
4000AS.TXT 

CAN.TIF 
PRINTER.DOC 



File Description 
ASCII atignment text file 
TIFF scanned-image file 
ASCII extended characters 



Test files were sent and received using clean simulator conditions, as well as impair- 
ment levels 1 through 4 — again, reflecting adverse line conditions you might encounter. 
Documents received from the tested fax devices were compared witii laser-output sam- 
ples of the original document files to judge quality of the ti-ansmission and visually confirm 
the integrity of the file transfer. The lab used the highest available baud rate for sending 
files from the test unit to the receiving fax unit, which supports 9600 baud in standard 
Group 3 mode. 

For testing fax device units that can receive files, the lab used a nine-page set of laser- 
output samples with a cover sheet; both dean and impaired line conditions were used. The 
lab viewed received fax files on the video display between test cycles and generated laser- 
output specimens of the received files using the fax software's file-printing utilities and a 
300^pi HP-compatible laser printer. 

—TOM 6ENF0RD 



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JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 45 



# TEST LAB 



ZOOM/MODEM 
HC2400S SENDFAX 



If you find yourself hemming and 
hawing every time someone says, 
"Just fax it to me," the Zoom/ 
Modem HC2400S SendFax may be 
just the ticket. For a mere $ 169, you'll 
gel a 2400-bps modem and a 9600-bps 
Group 3 send-only fax, both in one in- 
ternal board. Also included with the 
package is ProComm, probably the 
most popular telecommunications 
program around today and BitFax, 
software that works with the Zoom 
board. 

To install the Zoom SendFax, all 
you have to do is decide which COM 
port it's going to use and set a jumper 
on the board. Then just slip it in any 
8-bit expansion slot, and you're ready 
to go. (A slightly more expensive ex- 
ternal version of the Zoom is also 
available,) 

Youll be able to use the modem 
for two-way communication and the 
fax for sending faxes (but you won't 
be able to receive faxes with this 
Zoom board). 

The modem portion of the 
Zoom/Modem HC2400S SendFax 
works flawlessly. It has full Hayes 
AT-command set compatibility (in- 
cluding support for all the standard 
Hayes registers), and it boasts a speak- 
er with a tone that you'll find clearer 
than most. 

For telecommunicating, you can 
either settle in with the ProComm 
communications software or use Pro- 
Comm to download an even nicer com- 
munications program such as Telix, 

For sending faxes, you can get 
your feet wet with the bundled Bit- 
Fax, but it's no fun to use, and al- 
though you can combine graphics and 
text in your faxes, you may find the 
process cumbersome. You won't get 
many "oohs" and "ahs" for your doc- 
uments' design at the other end of the 
telephone line. 

There is other send-fax software, 



Installation: internal 
Slot/Bus Required: 8-bit 
Fax Group Supported: 3 
Other Requirements: n/a 
List Price: $169.00 

ZOOM TELEPHONICS 
207 South Street 
Boston, MA 02111 
(617)423-1072 
(800)631-3116 




however, and the Zoom will work 
with any program that supports the 
Sierra chip set. If you're using Micro- 
soft Windows, one excellent program 
is H^i>iFax (Delrina Technology, 1945 
Leslie Street, Toronto, Ontario, Cana- 
da M3B 2M3; 416-441-3676; $69), 
With it, you can send beautiful faxes, 
and doing so is about as easy as 
printing. 

Do I recommend the Zoom 
SendFax? You bet I do. It has per- 
formed flawlessly, and even though 
Fm not enamored with the bundled 



software, you just can't beat the 
Zoom's price. > 



CLIFTON KARNES 



All Benchmark/Performance Testing is 

conducted by Computer Product Test- 
ing Services, Inc. (CPTS), an indepen- 
dent testing and evaluation laboratory 
based in Manasquan, New Jersey. 
Every effort has been made to ensure 
the accuracy and completeness of this 
data as of the date of testing. Perform- 
ance may vary among samples. 



46 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



1 






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a FormGen (1630) Design and pnnt 
any business/office form easily. 
J FormGen Fill (1631) Fill out 
FormGen-created forms more quickly 
and accurately. ■ - ,::i r' ^ hcc^^Gon^ 
a FormGen Business Forms (1632) 
An excellent collection of pre-designed 
business fomns. dcq rormG-jn) HD 
□ Doctor Data Label (1717) A profes- 
sional mail list manager. HD, 51 2K 
J Checkmate Plus (1109, 1110) A 
complete checkbook manager. Handfes 
unlimited accounts and does reconcili- 
ation. :;: ^:.r::-w, ;. .--■. ^-l^ 
Q Business Kit (1656) Two programs 
lor small businesses: Simple Book- 
keeper and Billing Statement. 
USolvelt! (1 624J 625) Excellent finan- 
cial calculations package. \^ disks) HD 
a Invoice-It (1664) Keep track of in- 
voices, mercfiandise, vendors and 
customers at the point of saJe. HD 
J Names and Dates (1619,1620) An 
address book, calendar system, and 
mailing list combination. (2 disks 1 512K 
U ZPAY 3 (1 61 0, 1 61 1 ) A full-featu red 
payroll package. ? d^sksj HD 
:i PC-Areacode (1665) Helps you find 
the areacode for any city in the U.S. or 
Canada quickly and easily. 



EDUCATION 



U Computer Tutor (1235) Become a 
more effective computer user, 
J School Mom (1 251 ) Teaches kids 2- 
14 the basics of art, music, spelling. 
English and math. FANTASTIC II! CGA 
CI World (1221) A computer ericydo- 
pedia of global information. CGA 
LI Total Recall (1245) This program 
helps you quickly memorize words and 
information on any subject. 
J Algebrax (1233) A great program 
that teaches algebra, ''^ga DOS 3 
J Pre-Calcuius (1218) Excellent pre- 
calc tutor. Reviews algebra and trig. 
:2 Play n* Learn (1236) A collection of 
learning games for children, CGA 
LI Kir^derMath (1 262) An excellent math 
tutor for children. Three levels of diffi- 
culty. Very entertaining. CGA 
3 WordWhiz (1 252) A challenging word 
game that tests your vocabulary. 
J Word Gallery (1256) Teaches kids 
to link written words with objects. CGA 
J Wunder Book ( 1 269) A collection of 
5 colorful and fun games in English, 
Spanish, French, and German for chil- 
dren 3 to 10 years old. EGA or VGA 
J Animated Shapes (1264) Teaches 
shapes and colors to pre-schoolers 
using animated graphics. 640K. EGA 



SPREADSHEET 



J On Side (1506) Prints your spread- 
sheets (or any file) sideways. 
J As-Easy-As (1805) A lantastjc Lo- 
tus 1-2-3 compatible spreadsheet. 
U Lotus Learning Sys. (181 0,1 811) A 
complete package that makes it easy 
to learn Lotus 1-2-3, ,; j ; km iiD 
LI InstaCalc (1 81 2,1 8 1 3) A high-power, 
stand-alone spreadsheet which may 
also be run as aTSR (pop-up) spread- 
sheet, [2 disks J 



These programs require Windows 3.0. 
LI Almanac (1470) An excellent calen- 
dar/information utility. 
U Icon Library (1481) Customize your 
Windows operating environment with 
this collection of over 300 icons. 
3 Paint Shop (1488) An excellent 
graphics tool for desktop publishing. 
Supports BMP, GIF, IMG, MAC. PCX, 
and RLE formats. 

Li Active Life (1472) A powerful sys- 
tem for managing your active business 
and personal life. 

J Icondraw (1478) Create your own 
icons to use with Windows. 
□ XVTDraw (1489) A great drawing 
program that ffe in many ways better 
than the Windows Paintbrush program. 
J Screen Peace (1486) A FANTAS- 
TiC screen saver with many beautiful 
and interesting variations. 
a Change Cursor Utility (1487) Al- 
lows you to desig n your own arrow and 
hourglass cursors to use with Windows. 



WORD 
PROCESSING 



J WP 5.0/5.1 Clip Art (1875.1876) A 

large col lection of cli p art to add spice to 
your WP documents. {2 dssks) 
J PC Write 3.03 (1851-1853) A very 
popular full'featured word processor. 
(3disks)ViO,, 5i;;;K 

_J WP 5.1 Learninq System (1065- 
1 867) Be a more proficient WP user. (3 
disks) HD, 51 2K 

Q Readability Plus (1340) A comput- 
erized writing style analyzer. 
LlGrabPtus/LaserLabel (1883, 1884) 
Takes addresses from a word proces- 
sor and sends them to the printer. HD 



APPLICATIONS 



J Trip Planner (1 331 ) A computerized 
road map. Computes best route. Very 
popularl ' 

J Melody Maker (1918) A fun and 
easy-to-use program for new or expe- 
rienced music students. Comes with 
several songs. 

a Calendar Mate (1344) A full-fea- 
tured program designed to create per- 
sonalized calendars. 
LI Lotto! (1 31 3) Wi n the lottery with the 
help of your computer! 
J Bowl 101 (1346) A user-friendly tiowl- 
ing league management program. 
D The Electric Almanac (1341) A 
source for lots of usefut information. 



GRAPHICS 



LI Picture Label (1501) An excellent 
label printing program that uses 
PrintMaster or PrintShop graphics- 
J Banner Maker (1502) Prints ban- 
ners in various sizes, styles, and fonts. 
J Dazzle (1530) An amazing random- 
ized color pattern generator. Perfor- 
mance art for the eyes! EGA or VGA 
J Cooper PM Graphics (1516,1517) 
Approx. 800 clip-art images to be used 
with PrintMaster. [2 d sk?,) 
J Cooper PS Graphics (1518,1519) 
Approx- 800 clip-art images to be used 
with PrintShop. {2 disks) 



J Family Tree Journal (1122, 1123) 

Presents your genealogical information 
in book form, (2 disks) HD 
J Home Inventory (1 105) Keeps track 
of al! your personal property. 
J Personal Budget TooJs (1 1 08) Pro- 
vides a simple way to plan for annual, 
semi-annual, and quarterly expenses. 
J Will Kit (1343) Create your own wiil 
valid in alt 50 states. 
J Cash Control (1127) Manage your 
bank accounts the fast an6 easy way 
with this great program. 320K 



UTILITIES 



D Auto Menu (1409) A professional 
hard disk menu system. Run any of 
your programs from a customized 
menu. HD 

LI ViruScan (1440) Make sure your 
computer is virus-free with this valuable 
utility. Highly recommended? 
H Tree View (1418) A superior DOS 
command shell with pull-down menus. 
LI Telix (1422) The best telecommuni- 
cations program available, HD 
J VGA Fonts (1442) A collection of fun 
and interesting fonts to spice up your 
VGA screen display. VGA 
J Virus Central (1441 ) A program that 
simplifies the use of ViruScan by pro- 
viding a menu oriented environment. 
Requires ViruScan. 512K, CGA. HD 
u PC Pro (1443) Combines a user 
menu, a file manager, an enhanced 
DOS prompt, and many new features 
into one environment. 3&4K. HD 



EGA GAMES 



Lj The Last Half of Darkness (1962) 

Scary graphics and mysterious puzzles 
to challenge your mind. EGA, HD 
LI Dark Ages (1 964) A brilliant arcade/ 
adventure game with superb graphics 
and animation. 400K, EGA. 286 or faster 
machine. 

LI Poker Slot (1989) Plays iusl like the 
video poker machines you soe in casi- 
nos. Great graphics! EC , 
Q Commander Keen (1986) One of 
the best games we have ever seen. 
Exceptional play and graphics. EGA 
D Double Link (1983) A great Tetris 
style game that is sure to keep you 
challenged. lGA 



IMPORTANT 

CGA = Requires Color Computer 
EGA = Requires EGA or VGA 

HD = Requires Hard Drive 
51 2K = Requires 51 2K RAM 

For muni-disk sets 
count ali disks in set 



When you order and pay for 5 or 
more disks, select an additional 3 
disks FREE (linnit 3 free per order) 



GAMES 



J Double Blocks (1 970) A TERRIFIC 
Tetris clone for 1 or 2 players- Records 
lop scores. You will love this!! 
J Video PokerAJltima 21 (1945) The 
BEST poker and blackjack games! 
3 Pharaoh's Tomb (1 974) Face mon- 
sters and traps as you explore the 
pyramid. Your goal is to survive. 
J Bass Tour (1 925) Fish in your choice 
of lakes. Try to win the trophy. 
J ZZT (1921 ) Test your problem solv- 
ing ability and your arcade skills as you 
battle your way through 43 rooms. 
J Field General (1931) Experience 
the excitement of a pro football game 
from a coach's point of view. CGA. HD 
3 Insanity (1936) Find your way out of 
this maze before going insane! CGA 
Q The Monuments of Marsl (1920) 
Many tough levels filled with puzzles, 
traps and creatures. 350K, CGA 
□ Arctic Adventure (1982) Contains 
80 new levels of mind bending, finger 
twitching, arcade action. 350K. CGA 



VGA GAMES 



J Shooting Gallery (1990) Seven 

variations of a shooting range on your 

computer screen, VGA, mouse 

G VGA Sharks (1992) Recover lost 

treasure m shark infested waters in this 

action arcade game. VGA 

J Beyond Columns (1997) Beyond is 

like Tetris with a twist. VGA 

J VGA Jigsaw (1993) Uses beautiful 

pictures to create puzzles for you to put 

back together. VGA 



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Address . 
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\/\sBJUCn 

Exp. Date __ 
Signature 



.Zip. 



Disks Ordered ^ 

xS2.49orS1.99each...S^ 



J Need 3 1/2" disks? 
If SO - add $1 per disk 
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Packing & Handling , , . S 3,00 
Foreign Shipping Charge 
(Canada S2 / Other $4) S 

jCOD (U.S. Only) 

add S4 it you req. COD $^. 

J Federal Express - add S4 
(Continental U.S. only) $ „ 

TOTALS , 



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GOLD HILL 
SOFTWARE 



«>aldllill.«»K»7.>2S 



1-800-234-6467 



99 



^M 



Ctrcle Reader Service Number 198 



H FAX AND MODEM CAPABILITIES 




Brooktrout 
Fax-Mail 96 


The 

Complete 

FAX/Portable 


Fremont 
Frecom 
Faj(96 


GVC Mini- 
FaxModem 
FMM-4624 


Hayes JT 
FaxABm 
Portable 


Hayes JT 

Fax 9600B 


Intel 
SatisFAXti04i 


Okidata 
Okttet 24006 

Plus 
PC Modem 


Tandy 
FaxMate 


Touchbase 

WoridPort 

2400 Modem 


Zoom/Modem 
HC2400S 
SendFax 


; Max Speed 


9600 


9600 


9600 


4800 


4800 


9600 


9600 


2400 


4800 


2400 


4800 


mn FalJback 


2400 


2400 


2400 


2400 


300 


300 


300 


300 


2400 


300 


2400 


Data Modem 


O 





O 


• 


O 






• 


O 


• 


• 


Auto Fax/Modem Select 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


• 


n/a 






n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


• 


Fax Transmit 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






O 


• 





• 


Fax Receive 


• 


• 


• 


O 


• 









• 





O 


Otthered/Gfay Scale 





• 


O 


o 


• 






n/a 


• 


n/a 


• 


Compressed Fonts 


• 


• 





o 


• 






n/a 


• 


n/a 


o 


Max Modem Data Speed 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


2400 


n/a 


2400 


4800 


2400 


n/a 


2400 


2400 


AT Command Set 


n/a 


n/a 


n/a 


• 


n/a 






• 


n/a 


• 


• 


Background Operation 
Mode 


• 


• 


• 


• 









O 


• 





• 


Min Memory Requirement 


62K 


B40K 


41K 


T28K 


640K 


640K 


640K 


128K 


384K 


none 


320K 


Capture PrintScrMii 
Output 


• 


O 


O 


• 


• 






n/a 


• 


n/a 


O 


Capture Screen to File 


• 


o 








• 






n/a 


O 


n/a 


• 


Capture Text 
Sent to Printer 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






n/a 


• 


n/a 


• 


Capture Graphics 
Sent to Printer 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






n/a 


• 


n/a 


• 


Direct Scanner Transmit 


• 


• 


• 


o 


• 






n/a 





n/a 





Direct Printer Text- 
Rle Transmit 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






n/a 


o 


n/a 


• 


Direct Prirtter Graphics* 
File Transmit 


• 


• 


• 


# 


• 






rva 


o 


It/a 


• 


Max Pages 

Transmit/Receive 


no limit 


no fimit 


no limft 


255 


no limit 


no limit 


999 


n/a 


25 


n/a 


no limit 


Adds Document Headers 


• 


• 


O 


• 


• 






n/a 


• 


n/a 


• 


Generates Letterhead 


• 


• 


O 


• 


• 






n/a 





n/a 


• 


Generates Cover She«t 





• 


• 


• 


• 






n/a 




n/a 


• 


Auto Answering 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






• 




• 


• 


Auto Dialing 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






• 




• 


• 


Amo Printing 


• 


• 





n/a 


• 






n/a 




n/a 


n/a 


Auto Speed/Rate 


• 


• 


• 


• • 


• 











• 


• 


Performs Polling 


• 


• 





n/a 


O 






n/a 




n/a 


O 


Audible Speaker 





O 


• 


• 


• 






• 





• 


• 


Volume Control 


n/a 


n/a 


• 


• 


o 







• 


n/a 


• 


• 




• 


O 


• 


• 


o 




• 


n/a 


O 


n/a 


o 


File Conversions 


ASCII. PCX, 
EPG 


ASCII. PCX, 
TIF, CUT 
MSP. 
Epson FX, 
Compiete 
FAX 


ASCII, PCX, 
TIF. FAX 


ASCII, PCX, 
TIF. MAC 


ASCII, PCX. 
FAX 


ASCII, PCX. 
FAX 


ASCli. PCX, 

OCX, 

Epson 


n/a 


ASCII, PCX. 
TIF, CUT 
MSP, 
Epson FX 


n/a 


ASCII. PCX, 
TIF, IMG, 
P1X. 

WordStar. 
WordPerfect 


Second Jack 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


O 


• 



•=yes O^no 

4a C O M P U 



T E 



JULY 1991 



#TEST LAB 



Interpreting the Grid Information 

The grid information has been sup- 
plied by COMPUTE'S independent 
testing laboratory (Computer Product 
Testing Services) and should help you 
sort out the various capabilities of our 
Test Lab evaluation units. 

Because much of the technology- 
is new and unfamiliar, we have de- 
fined selected terms for you. 

Max Speed, The maximum tested fax 
speed (in the case of fax units) or mo- 
dem speed (in the case of modem- 
only units). The Max Modem Data 
Speed is the fastest modem speed for 
those devices with modem capabili- 
ties. This and all other speed listings 
are in bits per second (bps). 

Min Fallback. The minimum speed 
to which a modem or fax will fall 
back— that is, slow down — to match 
speeds with another machine or to 
perform extra error correction in or- 
der to check and ensure data integrity. 

Dithered/Gray Scale. A fax unit's 
ability to employ a technology called 
dithering to produce grays, not just 
black and white. 

Compressed Fonts, A fax unit's own 
fonts, which allow it to create output 
more closely resembling the original 
document. These onboard fonts can 
also enhance the readability of a 
document. 

Capture PrintScreen Output. A fax 
unit's ability to translate printer out- 
put into a transmittable image file. It 
simply dumps the screen to a file. 

Direct Scanner Transmit. A fax unit's 
ability to send a scanned image direct- 
ly without creating a disk file. 

Direct Printer Transmit. The capabili- 
ty to "print'* directly to a fax board. 

Polling. Unattended, automatic fax 
transmission and reception. A fax 
unit's abihty, at a deferred time, to 
send out form letters to a predeter- 
mined set of fax numbers. It also al- 
lows you to leave documents in your 
transmit queue and have them trans- 
mitted in response to a faxed request. H 






%. 




Being online never felt so fine. 

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FOUR STEPS 

TO HARD 

DISK POWER 



A couple of years ago, 20 
megs seemed like a lot of 
storage. But nowadays 
everything burns up disk 
space at a furious rate. Win- 
dows 3.0 takes up 5 or more 
megabytes, Lotus several 
more — heck, even Wing 
Commander, a game with un- 
believable graphics, can only 
manage those graphics by tak- 
ing up 5 megs on your disk. 
So it's time for an up- 
grade. You buy a larger disk 
and don*t want to pay to have 
it installed. Here's how to put 
in your first hard drive or add 
a second hard drive, > 



COMPUTE St 



One caveat before we go further. 
There is a wide variety of controllers, 
drives, and interfaces, so one article 
can't cover them all. What follows 
will tell you how lo install most har J 
drives. Here are the basic steps to the 
process: 

• Gather the information youll need 
before you start. 

• Configure the hard drive. 

• Install the hard drive. 

• Install the drive controller. 

ril also assume that you know 
that a drive system needs a hard 
drive, a circuit board called a hard 



kind of defect. Fm looking currently 
at a Seagate ST25 1 - 1 , a popular 42MB 
drive. It has a while paper label atop it 
marked Error Map. The label looks 
like this: 

Error Map 251/Serial # 26956413 
Cyl Hd BFI 
137 3 2463 

140 3 2463 

141 3 2463 
442 5 3722 

The three columns are labeled 

Cv/ (Cylinder), //^(Head), and BFI 
(Bytes From Index). As the disk spins, 
there is an arbitrary starting point that 



Removing Circuit Boards 

1 . Remove any connectors (diagramming them first). 

2. Remove the board's mounting screw. 

3. Grasp the board along its top edge and rock it GENTLY up and out, 

4. Avoid touching the edge connector once the board is out of its slot 



Grasp here. 




Edge connector (obscured in bus slot connection) 



drive controller, and cables. The con- 
troller has to be compatible with the 
hard drive, or this whole operation 
isn't going to work. 

If you're not clear on how to buy 
a controller and drive, take a look at 
"How to Choose a Hard Disk" in the 
May 1991 issue. 

Getting Ready 

There are a few things you'll need to 
know about your drive later on, so 
let's get this information together 
before we go any further. 

Find whatever documentation 
came with the drive, controller, and 
PC. You want to know the heads, cyl- 
inders, sectors per track, and write 
precompensation cylinder for your 
drive because the controller needs to 
know that data in order to support 
your drive. So get this from your ven- 
dor and write it down somewhere — 
you'll probably have use for it even 
after the drive is installed. 

Most drives have a paper label 
pasted on them with a bad track table 
or error map. It describes exactly 
where the disk's surface has some 



is the index — BFI is the distance from 
this index. (Note an oddity of the ta- 
ble: It sees an error on head 3 for 
tracks 137, 140, and 141 at the same 
BFI. It seems highly likely that an er- 
ror exists also on tracks 1 38 and 139. 
Personally, Td treat head 3, BH 2463 
as bad for cylinders 138 and 139.) 

The last suggestion for this instal- 
lation phase is to collect documenta- 
tion. There's no sense in tearing the 
computer apart only to realize that 
you never got the information on con- 
figuring the controller and that you 
won't get any further until you beg the 
company to send you that infor- 
mation. And besides, even if you con- 
vince the company to send it, you'll 
look strange lurking around the mail- 
box waiting for the mail carrier. (Ac- 
tually, most controller vendors have 
24-hour-a-day BBSs from which you 
can download your controller docu- 
mentation and other information.) 

Opening the Computer 

There*s a good chance you'll have to 
get into your computer before going 
much further, since most AT-class 



machines (286-, 386SX-, 386-, and 
486-based PCs) have their hard disk 
controller and hard disk cables al- 
ready in the machine. Here are some 
tips on getting inside the machine 
with a minimum of trouble. Take 
your time, and write everything down. 

Make a bootable DOS disk. If 
you don't have a bootable DOS flop- 
py, make one now with everything on 
it that you'll need to boot the system. 
If you're replacing a hard disk, you 
probably always boot from the hard 
disk and don't have a bootable floppy 
handy. Make one, and make sure that 
it has the things you'll need for soft- 
ware preparation: SETUP if it's an AT 
machine, whatever low-level format 
program you'll be using, FDISK, and 
FORMAT. 

Park your drivers heads. If you're 
removing an old hard disk, park it 
first. You should have a head-parking 
program around somewhere. 

Turn the computer off, and re- 
move the coven Leave the PC plugged 
in, however, but be sure to provide 
antistatic protection, as I'll explain in 
a minute. 

Be especially careful when re- 
moving the cover that you don't rip 
any ribbon cables on the edge of the 
cover. The ribbon cables for the flop- 
pies and hard drive often pop up as 
the cover is removed, making them 
easy prey for any sharp edges on the 
inside of the case. 

Also, find an egg carton and use 
it to help you organize the screws that 
you take out of the computer. You can 
use the compartments in the carton to 
keep the different screws separated. 
You'll probably find two or three sizes 
of screws in your PC: large ones that 
secure the cover, small ones that se- 
cure the hard drive, and medium- 
sized ones that fasten everything else. 

Ground yourself. Before you 
touch anything in the computer, 
touch the case of the power supply. 
(Don't know which is the power sup- 
ply? It's the silver box with the fan in 
it and the power switch on the side. 
It's also got a label on it that says — 
sometimes in several languages — "If 
you open me, I'll kill you.") 

Touching the power supply case 
drains away any static electricity 
that you might have built up. This 
only works if the power supply is 
plugged in. 

Heed this warning: In 1989, 1 
lived in The Condo from Hell for 
three months. It had the most static- 
attracting carpet I've ever seen in my 
life. I was working on a computer and 
absent-mindedly shuffled my feet on 
the carpet while trying to work out a 
problem. I reached over to remove a 
memory board from the system, and 
zap! A blue spark leapt about a centi- 



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JULY 1991 




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meter from my hand to the board. 
KJUed two memory chips and proba- 
bly weakened others. 

Get in the habit of touching the 
power supply case. (No, you won't get 
electrocuted by touching the case of 
the power supply Just don't open it 
up — that can kill you.) 

Remove the hard drive. If you al- 
ready have a hard drive, remove it 
and the controller. You can find the 
controller easily^ ust follow the rib- 
bon cables from the back of the hard 
disk to a circuit board. That circuit 
board is the controller. It'll probably 
look like a pincushion, as it usually 



sports a 34-pin connector and two 20- 
pin connectors. 

Before you do any of this, how- 
ever, please make good diagrams so 
you can put things back the way you 
found them! 

Circuit boards are held into the 
system with a single screw near the 
back of the PC, Remove the screw, 
and the board will come out. Rock the 
board gently back and forth to remove 
it from the system board. See the fig- 
ure "Removing Circuit Boards.'' 

Drives in XT-class systems are 
generally held in place with screws 
that bolt the drives right into the chas- 



sis. AT-class systems typically have 
rails fastened to the sides of the hard 
drives; the drives slide right into the 
AT chassis like drawers into desks. 
Metal tabs hold the drives in place. 

If you ordered a hard drive with 
an installation kit for AT-class ma- 
chines, the installation kit probably 
consisted of the plastic drive rails and 
screws to mount them on the drive. 

Configuring the Drive 

Next, you'll need to adjust two things 
on your hard drive: the terminator 
and the drive select jumper. If the 
drive is the only hard drive (floppies 



Hard Disk Drive Select Jumper 



Seagate 4026 
20MB 
Full Height 




Drive select 
jumper positions 



Terminating resistor 
(terminator) 



(Jumper is on position DS1 .) 



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42IVIB 
Half Height 




54 COMPUTE JULY 1991 



HOME OFFICE - FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT - CHALLENGE AND DISCOVERY 



WHATEVER YOUR HOME COMPUTING NEEDS, 

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IS YOUR HOME COMPUTING RESOURCE 



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don*t count), you don't need to mess 
with the terminator. 

The drive select jumper gives a 
drive an address as far as the control- 
ler is concerned: either address or 
address 1. Ordinarily, your first hard 
drive (let's call it drive C) is addressed 
0, and the second, if present, is ad- 
dressed L 

Let's call the second hard drive 
D, and ignore for the present that it's 
possible for a single drive to own 
more than one drive letter. 

The drive is addressed by placing 
a jumper — a liny plastic box (usually 
black, but I've seen white and blue) 
over two metal pins. 

Drives generally have pins for 
drive addresses through 5. but we 
only use addresses and 1 in the PC 
business. There are a set of pins to 
jumper for address 0, another set for 
address 1, and so on. 

The address your drive responds 
to is determined by where you put the 
jumper. There are two examples of 
drive select jumpers (and terminators, 
which we'll discuss presently) on 
"Hard Disk Drive Select Jumper." 
Just remember that the drive select 
jumper only goes on one address. 

So we've said that the drive can 
have address or 1. But which should 
it use? It depends on whether or not 



Power Connector 


^ 


/^^^ 


rf^ 


^^^^ 


T^ 



there's a twist in the cable. Your sys- 
tem probably uses two cables to con- 
nect the hard disk to the hard disk 
controller — a wider 34-wire cable and 
a skinnier 20- wire cable. The 34-wire 
cable carries the control signals; the 
20-wire cable the data signals. 

Take a loo!-: at the 34-wire cable. 
It should have a 34-wire connection 
on one side that attaches to the con- 
troller and a 34-wire connection on 
the other side that attaches to the 
drive. Is there also another 34'Wire 
connection in the middle of the cable? 
If so, that is intended to support a sec- 
ond hard drive. 

If you have the middle connector, 
look between the middle connector 
and the hard drive connector on the 
end. Is there a twist in the cable? 
Some cables are cut, twisted, and re- 
connected between lines 24 and 29 on 
the 34-wire hard disk cables. Knowing 



Hard Disk Cabling 



LLLUJJ- 

Controller 



Drive C: 



Drive D: 



SettoDSO. 
Remove terminator. 



SettoDSI. 
Keep terminator. 



DO" D 

LI ! 1 1 1 r 

Controller 



Drive D: 



Drive C: 



SettoDSI. 
Remove terminator. 



SettoDSO. 
Keep terminator. 






- 11 1 111 



Drive C: 




Drive D: 



Set to DSO, 
Remove terminator. 



Controller 

tn both cases, the drive cables are twisted t)etween the first and second drive connectors. 



SettoDSO. 
Keep terminator. 



n Of — 1 

1111111-^ 




Drive D: 








Drive C: 



Controller 



SettoDSI. 
Remove terminator. 



SettoDSI. 
Keep terminator 



whether your cable is twisted or not 
determines how you set the drive se- 
lect jumper. 

If your cable isn't twisted, you set 
the drive select jumpers as I've al- 
ready explained: Drive C is drive se- 
lect 0, and D is drive select 1 . On the 
other hand, if the cable has a cut and a 
twist, you set both drives to either 
drive select or drive select 1, as you 
see in "'Hard Disk Cabling." 

The Terminator 

The last adjustment on the drive is 
the terminating resistor chip, or 
terminator. 

You only need to mess with this 
if you're installing a second drive. The 
terminator is a group of resistors 
packaged in a chiplike housing. It will 
look like either a chip or half of a chip, 
and it can be any color, though it is 
generally not black so it will stand out 
from the rest of the board. 

Limited space prevents a com- 
plete explanation of the terminator, 
but basically it's a resistor needed to 
complete a bus circuit. Drives con- 
nected to a controller are on a bus 
much like the bus that your PC has^ — 
the slots on the PC motherboard. 
Something's got to hold up one end of 
the bus (termed an open collector bus), 
and that's a resistor called the pull-up 
or terminating resistor 

The problem arises when the con- 
troller sees two drives with termina- 
tors — the circuit then ends up with 
half the resistance that it's designed 
for. and twice as much current runs 
through the controller and drive elec- 
tronics. Result? You slowly cook the 
drive and controller. 

So remove the terminator from 
the drive attached to the connector in 
the middle of the cable. Again, the ar- 
rangement is pictured in "Hard Disk 
Cabling." Look back to the figure 
"Hard Disk Drive Select Jumper," 
and you can see two examples of com- 
mon hard drive terminators. 

Installing the Drive 

Now the drive's configured. Let's 
physically install it in the chassis. 

The easiest way to install a drive 
is to insert it partway into the chassis 
and then attach the ribbon cables. 

Stop at this point; don't get over- 
anxious to screw in the drive. The dif- 



56 COMPUTE 



J U L y 19 9 1 



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VGA Combinations 

For SX, TK, SL, TL, SL/2, TL«, RL. 
TL/3, 300O's» IBM, Compatibles 

Combo $489 

Monitor: 14^* CTX 

.29 Dot Pitch 
Card: Paradise 256K 
640 X 480, 256 Colors 

Super Combo $649 

Monitor ; 14" CTX 

.28 Dot Pitch 
Card: Trident 1 Meg 
1024 X 768, 256 Colors 



Modems 

Hayes Compatible, Inclades Software 

2400 Baud Internal $79 

1200 Baud Internal $59 

2400 Baud External $129 

1200 Baud External $89 

l360dpi Mouse w/ software $49 
[Serial Card AiiEi«ptHx/Ex $29 



Tandy, Hayes, IBM, AT & T, are registered THidemarlu. Prices Subject to change without notice. 
(614) - 592-4239 Foreign (614) ^ 592-1527 FAX (614) - 594-4180 Local 

Circle Reader Service Number 120 



C.O.D. 






ference between a good installation 
and a bad installation (as students in 
my PC troubleshooting classes hear 
over and over again) is how the cables 
are routed. 

Now that the cables are attached 
to the drive, take a minute and figure 
out where to put them. They go from 
the drive to the controller, but there's 
nearly always some slack. Sloppy in- 
stallers just stuff the cables into the 
case and then slap the cover on. This 
is a time bomb. The next time you 
take the cover off the PC, you'll end 
up catching the cables on something 
sharp, and youMl rip them. So take a 
minute and see if you can tuck them 
down out of the way. 

Don't forget to provide power to 
the drive with the power connector. 
That^s the white plastic connector 
with four wires running back to the 
power supply. You'll see several of 
these four-wire power connectors. 
They're pretty universal, and they'll 
connect to a floppy drive, hard disk, 
or tape drive. It doesn't matter which 
one you connect to the drive — they're 
all equal There isn't a special one for 
A and one for C, or anything like that. 



so use whatever power connector is 
handy- If they're all in use, you'll need 
a Y splitter to convert one of the pow- 
er connectors into two power connec- 
tors. Contact your hard disk dealer to 
buy a Y connector, if necessary. 

Now secure the drive. As we saw 
before, with most systems you either 
boh the drive directly to the chassis or 
secure it with metal tabs that keep it 
from sliding out of the box. See "Se- 
curing Hard Drives" for details. 

Instalf the Hard Disk ControMer 

If the controller isn't already installed, 
put it in now. Installing the board is 
just the reverse of removing it; push 
the board's edge connector down into 
an expansion bus slot on the PC 
motherboard and then secure it with a 
screw on the board's back bracket. 

A common question at this point 
is My PC has five (or eight or three) ex- 
pansion slois. Does it matter which 
slot I put the board in? The answer is 
Basically, no. Some boards are 8-bit 
boards. They're identifiable because 
they have a single edge connector. 

Other boards are 1 6-bit boards. 
They have two edge connectors. A 1 6- 



Securing Hard Drives 




XT drives— both floppy and hard— are secured to the XT chassis directly. 



^ 




^ 







In AT-style systems rails are placed on the drives so they can slide in and out of 
the chassis like drawers in a desk. Metal tabs keep the drives in place. 



bit board should go in a 16-bit slot, 
but an 8-bit board can go in either an 
8- or a 16-bit slot. 

Now hook up the cables from the 
hard drive. If you've got an AT sys- 
tem, the controller will probably be a 
combination floppy and hard disk 
controller, so be sure to hook up the 
cable for the floppy drives, too. 

Introduce the Controller and 
the Drive 

Seems only polite, hmmm? 

The controller needs to know 
what kind of drive it's dealing with. 
On XT-style systems you give it that 
information during the first part of 
the software installation — a step 
called low-level format, so we won't 
worry about that here. 

On AT systems, the system BIOS 
has a table of drive types built into it. 
Most clones kiiow of 47 different hard 
drives. Why 47? Who knows? The 
earliest IBM ATs only knew of 14 
drive types, and later ones knew 25. 
The last batch had 47 drive types. 
doners just copied IBM from that 
point on. 

You just figure out which drive 
type most closely describes your hard 
disk — remember I told you to have 
heads, cylinders, number of sectors, 
and write precompensation handy? 

For instance, I use a 60MB hard 
drive with 1024 cylinders, seven 
heads, 1 7 sectors per track, and no 
write precompensation. There isn't a 
drive type in my clone's ROM that 
matches that, but there*s one that's 
close — 977 cylinders, seven heads, 17 
sectors per track, and no write pre- 
comp. That's drive type 18. 

Once I figured that out, I ran my 
clone's SETUP program and told the 
system that I had drive type 1 8, and 
then I was ready to format the disk. I 
lost a little space, as I'm only using 
977 of my 1024 cylinders, but that*s 
not a big deal 

Well, that's how to do a hard- 
ware installation of most PC hard 
disks. Again, not every drive installa- 
tion works as I've described, but this 
is the procedure for installing drives 
in most XT- and AT-class systems 
these days. Good luck and have 
fun^ — it's a great feeling to do a hard 
drive installation by yourself! 

Mark Minasi is an owner of Moulton, 
Minasi, & Company, an Arlington, Virginia- 
based firm specializing in training technical 
and nontechnical users how to support, 
upgrade, and repair their PCs. He is also 
the author of COMPUTE'S recently pub- 
lished Maintaining, Upgrading, and Trou- 
bleshooting IBM PCs, Compatibles, and 
PS/2 Personal Computers. Some of the il- 
lustrations used in this feature were done 
by Terry Keaton, an associate with Moul- 
ton, Minasi, & Company. B 



58 COMPUTE JULY 1991 




ONLINE 



DENNY ATK»N 



Most of US have stories of 
brushes with the famous and 
infamous — you may have 
shared an elevator with Jimmy 
Stewart or met Lewis Grizzard at a 
cocktail party^ or perhaps your mother- 
in-law was Richard Nixon's nurse. 

However, even if some of us have 
had the good fortune to meet admired 
celebrities once or twice in our lives, 
only a few of us will ever have the op- 
portunity to hold a prolonged discus- 
sion with our favorite authors or chat 
about world events with well-known 
TV personalities. 

Who are those lucky few who can 
join the in-crowd? If you own a mo- 
dem, you're only a phone call away 
from schmoozing with the famous* 

The global village prophesied by 
Marshall McLuhan is in its formative 
stages on the online networks. You 
can log on to CompuServe and send 
ultraconservative radio-talk show 
host Rush Limbaugh a letter about his 
latest show. Or log on to BIX and ask 
science fiction author Jerr>' Pournelle 
about his latest novel. During the Per- 
sian Gulf War, you could see military 
analyst Jim Dunnigan on network 
televisipn explaining Saddam's latest 
moves. If you were online with GE- 
nie, though, you could have asked 
him to elaborate on his short TV talk 
by posting a notice in the message 
base. 

Of course, not everyone is 
hooked into the networks. Still, you're 
a lot more likely to be able to engage 
your favorite authors in a conversa- 
tion if you run into them online than 
if you try to call them at home. 

While you'll find an interesting 
assortment of famous {and perhaps 
infamous) personalities on the online 
networks, not everyone has moved 
into the global village yet. If you're 
into science fiction, though, youMl 
fmd that many people associated with 
that genre are available online. Per- 
haps because the field is intimately as- 
sociated with high technology, the 
personalities associated with it aren't 
intimidated by online networks. 

Whatever the reason, science fic- 



tion fans will find the online networks 
a paradise of information, tidbits, and 
gossip. The most active area I've en- 
countered online is GEnie's Science 
Fiction RoundTable (SFRT). Pop 
into the message base (which is cov- 
ered under GEnie's $4.95/month 
Star*Services flat fee), and you'll fmd 
an incredible wealth of messages from 
well-known writers, editors, review- 
ers, directors, special-effects experts, 
and occasionally even actors. 

The SFRT is divided into 19 dif- 
ferent categories, each concentrating 
on a specific aspect of the genre. Top- 




ics include novels, authors, films, sci- 
ence fiction TV shows, comics, 
conventions, fandom, science fact, 
writers' workshops, and an entire cat- 
egory devoted to Star Trek, 

The Trek category, often the 
most active of the SFRTs topics, is a 
dream come true for fans of "Star 
Trek: The Next Generation." It's a 
great place for Trekkies to get together 
and discuss the show with each other, 
of course. However, they can also talk 
about the latest episodes with people 
like Mike Okuda and Ron Moore, 
who work on the show's computer 
displays and special effects. Or Chip 
Chalmers, who has directed a few epi- 
sodes of the series. Or Brad Ferguson, 



Carmen Carter, Peter David, John 
Vomhclt, Vonda Mclntyre, and other 
Star Trek novehsts. Even Wil (Wesley 
Crusher) Wheaton has been known to 
participate in the SFRT, although he's 
been absent lately due to the unfortu- 
nate death of his Macintosh. 

Discussions range from the seri- 
ous to the silly. In one topic, Brad Fer- 
guson was discussing how unhappy he 
was with the major edits done to his 
most recent Star Trek novel and how 
he hopes people will be able to read 
his original version through the fan 
press. Reading on, I encountered a 
topic called Carrot Juice, Earl Grey, 
Hot, where a number of SFRT readers 
were writing a story about various 
Looney Tunes characters loose on the 
Enterprise. It features characters like 
Elmer Fudd as Wocutus of Borg. 
("Wooney Tunes are iwwewevant. 
Pwepare to be assimuwated.") 

Even if you're not a Trek fan, 
there's something here for you. You'll 
also find mainstream SF authors such 
as Lawrence Watt-Evans, Michael P. 
Kube-McDowell, Jerry Pournelle, Da- 
mon Knight, Mike Resnick, and Da- 
vid Bischoff online. Some folks, in the 
presence of such well-known names, 
will remain lurkers and read, but not 
join in, the discussions. Once you join 
in, you'll have a great time. These 
may be famous writers, but they're 
also regular folks. 

There's also the infamous CAT 
24, the Anything Goes category. Even 
if you're a devoted SF fan who reads 
fanzines (fan magazines) and attends 
conventions, you probably don't 
know what your favorite author 
thinks about subjects ranging from 
nuclear power and Operation Desert 
Storm to reincarnation and the oppo- 
site sex. In CAT 24, you'll find out. 

This is just a taste of what you'll 
find in the SFRT. You'll find similar 
areas on BIX (SF), CompuServe (Sci- 
ence Fiction and Fantasy Forum), and 
People/Link (SF & F Club). So log on, 
beam up, and say hi. 

Send comments and suggestions to 
DENNYi on BIX and GEnie, DENNY 
on Plink or 75500,3602 on CIS. B 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 




POINT & CLICK 



CLIFTON 



KARNES 



HI hen most people think of 
Windows, they think of appli- 
cations with superhigh price 
tags. It's certainly true that 
Windows has its share of $500-and'Up 
programs, but there are many excel- 
lent software packages available for 
under $100, Here are two essential 
utilities, each priced below $ 1 00. 

First, there's Intermission (ICOM 
Simulations, 648 South Wheeling 
Road, Wheeling, Illinois 60090; 708- 
520-4440; $49.95), a superb screen 
blanker you can set for a predeter- 
mined period or activate on demand 
by moving the mouse pointer to one 
of the screen's four corners (you 
choose which corner). 

That's usually it for a screen 
blanker, but with Intermission, the 
fiin is just beginning. While your 
screen is blanked, Intermission offers 
34 animated displays, which the pro- 
gram can select at random. 

These animated displays include 
Marine Screen (with multicolored fish 
that occasionally turn to look at you 
and also eat each other), Clock (an an- 
alog clock that slowly bounces around 
your screen). Dissolve (a pixel-by- 
pixel fade to black). Fireworks (with 
beautiful multicolored rockets). Flash- 
Hght (which illuminates a slowly mov- 
ing circle). Kaleidoscope Oust like the 
kid*s toy). Puzzle (which turns your 
screen into an animated shuITle puz- 
zle), Spaceflight (which moves you 
through space at warp factor 5), Mosa- 
ic (a quilt of elegant symmetrical de- 
signs), and Intermission (which is a 
lively display of pop bottles, popcorn, 
and candy). 

Installing Intermission is simple. 
Just run the setup program and follow 
directions. You'll find the files IN- 
TERMlSSION.EXE, SAVERDLL 
.DLL, and ANTSW.INI in your 
WINDOWS subdirectory, and the 
IMX animation files in a directory 
called SAVER. One additional file, 
ANTHOOK.386 may go in your SYS- 
TEM subdireclor>'. 

To configure Intermission, click 
on its icon, and get ready for the show. 

The other essential Windows util- 



ity is StraighiLine (First Genesis Soft- 
ware, 1000 Shelard Parkway, Suite 
270, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55427; 
612-544-4445; $99), a menu program 
and task manager. At $99, Straight- 
Line may seem a little pricey, but it's 
worth every penny. It's unquestion- 
ably the fastest way to get from point 
A to point B in Windows, 

Straight Line allows you to install 
Windows and DOS applications on a 
pop-up menu. From the menu, you 
can launch programs, switch to active 




programs, run programs not on the 
menu, or add new programs to the 

menu. 

To set up StraighiLine, simply 
run the program and choose Launch 
from the menu bar and Setup from 
the pull-down menu. 

From Setup, you can browse 
through your files and install any 
EXE, COM, or BAT file. If there are 
documents associated with an execut- 
able file, you can attach these to it. 

After installing your programs, 
click on Done to put StraighiLine to 
work. To call Straight Line, press a 
special hot key or mouse click. The 
program provides several to choose 



from, or you can supply your own, 

Fve found that the right mouse 
button makes an excellent hot key, or 
more appropriately, hot button. Then 
you're only two clicks and a short 
mouse movement away from running 
any program on your system. 

If you find a conflict with the 
right mouse button — Paintbrush, 
Word for Windows, ToolBook, Turbo 
Pascaifor Windows, and several other 
programs use the right button— you 
can change it. 

After you've installed Straight- 
Line, simply press your hot key or 
button to call up the menu. You'll see 
a tiny window with a title bar and a 
menu bar that has just two selections 
on it: Launch and Active. If you chose 
a hot button, the window will appear 
right under your mouse pointer with 
the pointer directly over the Launch 
menu selection. 

If you want to run a program, 
simply click your left button, drag to 
the Windows or DOS application you 
want to run, and then release the 
mouse button. 

If you've associated documents 
with a program, you'll see a cascading 
menu with each installed document's 
name when you select the program 
from StraighiLine^ menu. Click on a 
document, and the associated pro- 
gram runs and loads the doc file. 

From StraightLine's Active 
menu, you can switch to any active 
application much as you can from 
Windows 'Task Manager, but 
StraighiLine has some important 
enhancements. 

For starters, there's a menu selec- 
tion that allows you to minimize all 
your active programs. This is great if 
you have a large number of windows 
open and you need to get organized. 

You can also press Control and 
click on any Windows application (in- 
cluding Program Manager) to close it. 

Pressing Shift while clicking on a 
program will minimize it to an icon. 

In short. Straight Line provides 
amazing control over your Windows 
environment. Il*s undoubtedly the 
most useful utihty on my desktop. B 



eO COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




I f you want to up- 
grade your PC, the 
first thing to con- 

! sider is a faster, 
larger hard disk. To make shop- 
ping for your dream disk easier, 
we've compiled a Hst of more 
than 1 50 hard disks of 100MB or 
more, complete with their specifi- 
cations and the address and tele- 
phone number of each 
manufacturer. 

Use this list as a starting 
point to find the disks with the 
specs you want in the price range 
you can afford. While some of 
these drives aren't yet widely 
available to consumers, they do 
exist; shop around. The prices 
listed here are mail-order prices, 
and they may have dropped since 
press lime. 

How to Read the Chart 

The drives in this chart are listed 
in alphabetical order by manufac- 
turer (you*ll fmd addresses and 
telephone numbers at the end of 
the chart). Each manufacturers 
drives are then listed by capaci- 
ty — the most important specifica- 
tion for most people. 

Following capacity, you'll 
find the model number, the form 
factor (which is the diameter of 
the drive's disks), the exterior di- 
mensions of the drive (so you can 
make sure it fits in the space you 
have), and the number of heads. 

Next is the most important 
column in the chart after capaci- 
ty: seek time. Seek time is a mea- 
sure of a hard disk's speed with 
smaller numbers meaning a faster 
disk. Just two years ago, 65 milli- 
seconds was standard, but just 
look at the seek limes for these 
drives. Most are less than 25ms, 
and some are considerably less 
than that. 

The next column lists inter- 
face, which determines many of 
the drive's qualities (especially its 
speed and capacity) and the way 
the drive connects to your PC. 
Here's a brief explanation of each 
interface type. 

AT (Advanced Technology) 
is the bus used in the IBM AT 



and compatibles. Drives desig- 
nated with an AT by the manu- 
facturer usually employ an IDE 
interface. 

ESDI (Enhanced Small De- 
vice Interface) is an interface 
standard that puts some control- 
ler functions on the drive itself. 
ESDI allows for data transfers of 
1 MB-3MB per second and can 
be used for drives up to one giga- 
byte in size. 

IDE (Integrated Drive Elec- 
tronics), like SCSI (see below), is 
an interface design that puts the 
controller on the drive itself 
IDE, however, offers lower 
performance. 

MCA (MicroChannel Archi- 
tecture) drives require a 
PS/2-style bus connection. 

SCSI (Small Computer Sys- 
tem Interface) is an interface 
standard that puts most of the 
controOer functions on the drive 
itself It oiTers transfer speeds of 
1MB-4MB per second. SCSI also 
allows as many as seven addi- 
tional devices to be daisychained. 
SCSI-2 is faster than SCSI but is 
fully compatible with the earlier 
standard. 

The next column, Encoding, 
refers to the way data is stored on 
a disk. Almost ail of the high- 
capacity drives listed here use 
RLL, for Run Length Limited, a 
system borrowed from the main- 
frame world thai increases stor- 
age by 50-100 percent over 
previous encoding methods. 

Under MTBF (Mean Time 
Between Failures), the numbers 
represent the hours of service you 
can expect from your drive. For 
most of these drives, the MTBF 
is 50,000 hours or more, which 
means that if you left your drive 
on 24 hours a day, it would last 
nearly six years. Most of us will 
be looking at WO-gigabyte drives 
by that time. 

The last column lists price, 
and as mentioned above, these 
are mail-order prices, which may 
have dropped since press time. 

Any column with n/a indi- 
cates that the information was 
not available at press time. Q 



DAVID 



SEARS 



BUYER'S GUIDE 



Manufacturer 


Capacity in 
Megabytes 


Mod«l 
Name 


Form 
Factor 


in Inchdft 


Number 
of Heads 


Seek Time 
in Milliseconds 


Interlace 


Encoding 


MTBF 

in Hours 


Price 


Connef 


104.9 


CP3100 


35 


1.625X4X5.75 


8 


25 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


S469 




104.9 


CP3104 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


8 


25 


AT 


RLL 


50.000 


S449 




m 


CP30104 


3.5 


1X5.75X4 


4 


19 


AT 


RLL 


40.000 


$569 




1?0 


CP30100 


3.5 


1X5.75X4 


4 


19 


SCSI 


RLL 


40,000 


n/a 




120 


CP30109 


3.5 


1X5.75X4 


4 


19 


MCA 


RLL 


40,000 


n/a 




212.6 


CP320OF 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


8 


16 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


S779 




212.6 


CP3204F 


3,5 


1.625X4X5.75 


8 


16 


AT 


RLL 


50.000 


S785 




212.6 


CP3209F 


3.5 


1625X4X5,75 


8 


16 


MCA 


RLL 


50.000 


n/a 




510 , 


CP500 


3.5 


1,625X4X5.75 


12 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 




5t0 


CP504 


3.5 


1.625X4X575 


12 


12 


AT 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 


Fuj*t»u 


105 


M616SA 


3.5 


1X4X5.75 


4 


20 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


n/a 




105 


M616T 


3.5 


1X4X5J5 


2 


20 


PC/AT 


RLL 


50,000 


n/a 




135.2 


M2613T 


3.5 


1.625X4X5,75 


6 


20 


AT 


RLL 


50.000 


S515 




136.6 


M2613SA 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


6 


20 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


S515 




180,3 


M2614T 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


e 


20 


AT 


RLL 


50.000 


n/a 




182.4 


M2614SA 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


8 


20 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


5649 




235.2 


M2621S 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


5 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


50,000 


n/a 




330.1 


M2622S 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


7 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


50,000 


n/a 




366 


M2261 


5.25 


3.3X5.7X8 


8 


16 


ESDI/SCSI 


RLL i 


200.000 


$1,429 




425.1 


M2623S 


3,5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 ' 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


200.000 


n/a 




520.1 


M2624S 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


11 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


200,000 


n/a 




688 


M2263 


5.25 


3.3X5.7X8 


15 


14.5 


ESDI/SCSI 


RLL 


200.000 


$1,699 




1079 


M2266 


5.25 


3.3X5.7X8 


15 


14.5 


ESDI/SCSI 


RLL 


200,000 


n/a 


Kalok 


105 


KL3100 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


6 


25 


AT/IDE 


RLL 


50.000 


n/a 


Maxtor 


130.4 


7120 


3.5 


1X4X5.75 


2 


15 


SCS! 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




157.4 


XT4170S 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


7 


14 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


$859 




157.93 


)a4170E 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8,2 


7 


14 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


$849 




203.04 


XT4230E 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


9 


16 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


$899 




213 


LXT213 


3.5 


1.625X4X5-75 


7 


15 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


S720 




337.56 


XT4380S 


5,25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


15 


16 


SCSI 


ALL 


150.000 


SI .249 




338.4 


XT4380E 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 2 


15 


15 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


$1,269 




340 


1X7340 


3.5 


1,625X4X5.75 


7 


13 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


$1,469 




360.31 


xTssaos 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


8 


14,5 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




360.97 


xTeseoE 


5.25 


3.25X5.75x8.2 


8 


14.5 


ESDI 


RLL 


150,000 


$1,249 




437 


LXT437 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




535 


LXT535 


3.5 ! 


1625X4X575 


11 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




541.4 


XT8610E 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


12 


15.5 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




616.69 


XTe702S ! 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


15 


16.5 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


$1,699 




675 58 


XT8760S 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


15 


165 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


S1,S95 




676.82 


XT8760E 


5,25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


15 


16.5 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


Si. 895 




694.7 


XT88O0E 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8,2 


15 


16.5 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 ' 


n/a 




696 


pioeE 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8.2 


15 


13 


ESDI 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 




696 


P108S 


5,25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


9 


125 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 




1005 


Pn2S 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


19 


10,5 


SCSt-2 


RLL 


100.000 


n/z 




1027.7 


P012S 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8.2 


15 


13 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 



62 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



BUYER'S GUIDE 



Manuracturer 


Capacity in 
Megabytes 


Model 
Name 


Form 
Factor 


Dimensions 
in Inches 


Number 
of Heads 


Seek Time 
in Mlltiseconds 


Interface 


Encoding 


MT8F 
in Hours 


Price 


MsKtor 


1051 


P112E 


525 


3.25X5,75X8.2 


15 


13 


ESDI 


RLL 


1 00.000 


n/a 




1051 


P116E 


5 25 


3.25x5.75X8,2 


15 


13 


ESDI 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 




1160 


P113E 


525 


3,25X5.75X82 


15 


13 


ESDI 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




1470 


Pn7E 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X82 


19 


13 


ESDI 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 




1470 


P117S 


5.25 


3.25X5,75X8.2 


19 


13 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 


Micropoils 


15a 


1674 1 


525 


3.25X5.75X8 


7 


16 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


S959 




158 


1674HS 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


7 


39 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


S959 




161 


1654 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


7 


16 


ESDI 


RLL 


15Q.0O0 


S899 ' 




331 


1578 


5,25 


3.25X5,75X8 


15 


16 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


SI. 445 




331 


1578HS ' 


5,25 


3.25X5,75X8 


15 ' 


3,9 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


SI ,445 




333 


1558 


5,25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


19 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


SI .249 




340 


1634 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


7 


15 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


$1,395 




340 


1684HS 


5,25 


3,25X5.75x8 


7 


3,9 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


SI .395 




345 


1654 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


7 


15 


ESDI 


RLL 


150,000 


SI .295 




676 


1568 


5.25 


3.25X575X8 


15 


16 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


S1829 




668 


1588 


525 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


16 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


150.000 


$1,855 




66e 


158aHS 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


3,9 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


SI .819 




671 


1538 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


14,5 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




1034 


1598 


5.25 


3.25X5,75X8 


15 


14.5 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


150.000 


S2,689 




1034 


1598HS 


5,25 


3.25X575X8 


15 


3.9 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


150.000 


$2,639 




1346 


1518 


5,25 


3.25X575X8 


15 


145 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




1346 


1528 


5.25 


325X5.75X8 


15 


14 5 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




1748 


1548 


525 


3.25x5.75x8 


15 


14 


SCSI-2 


MZR 


150.000 


n/a 


MJ^croscience 


1073 


7100 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


7 


18 


AT/IDE 


RLL 


60.000 


n/a 




110.3 


5100 


3.5 


1,625X4X5.75 


7 


18 


ESDI 


RLL 


60,000 


n/a 




120.4 


710020 


3,5 


1.625x4x5.75 


7 


18 


AT/IDE 


RLL 


60.000 


n/a 




12386 


5100-20 


35 


1,625X4X5 75 


7 


18 


ESDI 


RLL 


60,000 


n/a 




20138 


7200 


3.5 


1.625X4X5,75 


7 


18 


AT/IDE 


RLL 


60.000 


n/a 




366 


FH2414 


3-5 


3.25X5.75X8 


8 


14 


ESDI 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




366 


FH3414 


35 


3.25X5,75X8 


8 


14 


SCSI 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 




7876 


FH2777 


3,5 


325X5,75X8 


15 


14 


ESDI 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




7876 


FH3777 


35 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


14 


SCSI 


RLL 


1O0.0O0 


n/a 




1062.2 


FH212O0 


3.5 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


14 


ESDI 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 




1062,2 


FH31200 


3.5 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


14 


SCSI 


RLL 


1 00.000 


n/a 


Quantum 


105 


105S 


3,5 


1.625X4X5,75 


6 


19 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


S539 




120 


120S 


3,5 


1,625X4X5.75 


3 


15 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


,SBaq 




120 


120AT 


3.5 


1,625X4X5,75 


3 


15 


AT 


RLL 


50,000 


n/a 




168 


170S 


35 


1,625X4X575 




15 


SCSI 


RLL 


50,000 


n/a 




168 


170AT 


3,5 


1,625X4X5.75 




15 


AT 


RLL 


50.000 


n/a 




210 


21 OS 


3,5 


1.625X4X5.75 




15 


SCSI 


RLL 


50.000 


n/a 




210 


21 OAT 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 




15 


AT 


RLL 


50.000 


n/a 




331 


330AT 


3.5 


1.625X4X5,75 




13 


AT 


RLL 


75.000 


n/a 




331 


330S 


3.5 


1,625X4X5.75 




13 


SCSI 


RLL 


75.000 


n/a 




425 


425AT 


3,5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


13 


AT-BUS 


RLL 


75.000 


n/a 




425 


425S 


3.5 


1.625X4X5,75 


9 


13 


SCSI 


RLL 


75,000 


n/a 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 63 



BUYER'S GUIDE 



Manufacturer 


Capacity in 
Megabytes 


Model 
Name 


Form 
Factor 


Dimensions 

In Inches 


Number 
of Heads 


Seek Time 
(n Milliseconds 


interface 


Encoding 


MTBF 
in Hours 


Price 


Quantum 


105 


LPS105AT 


3,5 


1X4X5.75 


4 


17 


AT'BUS 


RLL 


60,000 


n/a 




105 


LPS! OSS 


3,5 


1X4X5.75 


4 


17 


SCSI 


RLL 


60,000 


n/a 


R4>dime 


112,5 


3139AP 


3,5 


1,625X4X5.75 


5 


16 


AT 


RLL 


100,000 


S499 




112.5 


3139S 


3.5 


1,625X4X5,75 


5 


17.5 


SCSI 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




121.99 


3151A 


3,5 


1X4X5 75 


4 


IB 


AT 


RLL 


50,000 


$599 




210 


3259S 


3.5 


1,625X4X5,75 


9 


17.5 


SCSI 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




213 


3269AP 


3.5 


1,625X4X5 75 


9 


18 


AT 


RLL 


10O.000 


S799 




331 


3331S 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


7 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


100.QOO 


n/a 




426 


3426S 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




540 


3540S 


3,5 


n/a 


9 


12 


SCSI 


RLL 


100.000 


n/a 


Seagate 


106.9 


ST3120A 


3.5 


1X4,02X5,77 


3 


16 


AT 


RLL/ZBR 


150,000 


n/a 




107 


ST2125AV 


5.25 


1,625X5.75X8 


2 


18 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 




107 1 


ST2125N 


5.25 


1,625X5.75X8 


2 1 


18 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100,000 


$735 




107 


ST2125IVM 


5,25 


1.625X5.75X8 


2 


18 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100,000 


n/a 




113.4 


ST1133N 


3.5 


1-625X4X5,75 


5 


15 


SCSt 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




126 


ST3144N 


3.5 


1X4.02X577 


3 


16 


SCSI 


RLL/ZBR 


150,000 


n/a 




128.4 


ST1150R 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


S 


15 


ST506 


RLL 


150,000 


n/a 




130 


ST3144A 


as 


1 X4,02X5,77 


3 


16 


AT 


RLL/ZBR 


150.000 


n/a 




13Q.7 


ST1144A 


3,5 


163X4.02X5.77 


7 


19 


AT 


ZBR 


150.000 


S439 




155 


Sr4l82N 


5.25 


3,25X5,75X8 


9 


165 


SCSI 


RLL 


100,000 


S799 




155 


ST4182NM 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


9 


16,5 


SCSI 1 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




158,9 


ST1186N 


3.5 


1,625X4X575 


7 


15 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


n/a 




160 


ST2182E 


5.25 


1.625X5.75X8 


3 


16 


ESDI 


RLL 


100,000 


$929 




160 


ST4182E 


5.25 


3.25X5 75 XS 


9 


16.5 


ESDI 


RLL 


100.000 


S799 




163.B 


ST1186A 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


7 


15 


AT 


RLL 


150,000 


n/a 




171,9 


ST1201N 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


15 


SCSt 


RLL 


150,000 


n/a 




177,5 


ST1201A 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


15 


AT 


RLL 


150.000 


$699 




177.B 


ST1201E 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


15 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


$899 




183 


ST2209N 


5.25 


1.625X5,75X8 


3 


18 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100,000 


S939 




183 


ST2209NM 


5.25 


1,625X5.75X8 


3 


18 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 




183 


ST2209NV 


5.25 


1,625X5,75X8 


3 


18 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100,000 


n/a 




204,2 


ST1239N 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


15 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


$775 ! 




210.7 


ST1239A 


3.5 


1.625 X4X5J5 


9 


15 


AT 


RLL , 


150,000 


S859 




241 


ST2774A 


5.25 


1,625X5.75X8 


5 


16 


AT 


RLL 


100,000 


n/a 




307 


ST4350N 


5,25 


3,25X5,75X8 


9 


16,5 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100,000 


SI .249 




307 


ST4350NM 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


9 


17.5 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 




337 


ST2383N 


5.25 


1.625X5.75X8 


7 


14 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


$1,269 




337 


ST23a3NM ! 


5 25 


1,625X5.75X8 


7 


14 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 




338 


ST2383A 


5,25 


1625X575X8 


7 


15 


AT 


RLL 


100,000 


$1,295 




338 


ST2383E 


5,25 


1,625X575X8 


7 


16 


ESO) 


RLL 


1 00.000 


$1,289 




336 


ST43B3E 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


13 


18 


ESDI 


RLL 


100.000 


SI .295 




338 


ST4334E 


5.25 


3 25X5.75X8 


15 


145 


ESDI 


RLL 


100,000 


SI .359 




357 


ST4365N 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


107 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100,000 


$1,499 




357 


ST4385NM 


5,25 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


107 ' 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 




357 


ST4385NV 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


107 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 



64 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 








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/ 




BUYER'S GUIDE 



Manufacturer 


Capacity in 
Megabytes 


Model 
Name 


Form 
Factor 


Dimensions 
In inches 


Number 
of Heads 


Se6kT1me 
in Mittifteconda 


Interlace 


Encoding 


MTBF 
In Hourt 


Price 


Seagate 


m 


ST4442E 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


16.5 


ESDI 


RLL 


100,000 


SI ,469 




442 


ST2502N 


5.25 


1,625X5,75X8 


7 


16 


SC^i 


ZBR 


100.000 


$1,749 




442 


ST2502NM 


5.25 


1,625X5,75X8 


7 


16 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 




442 


ST25Q2rjV 


5.25 


1.625X5.75X8 


7 


16 


SCSI 


2BR 


lOO.OOO 


n/a 




462 


ST1480A 


3.5 


1.625X4X5.75 


9 


14 


AT 


ZBR 


150.000 


n/a 




613 


ST4702W 


525 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


16.5 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100,000 


SI, 795 




613 


ST4702NM 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


16,5 


SCSI 


ZBR 


100.000 


n/a 




676 


ST4756E 


5.25 


3,25x5,75x8 


15 


15.5 


£SOf 


RLL 


150,000 


S1.895 




675 


ST4766N 


5.25 


3.25X5 75X8 


15 


15.5 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


$1,995 




676 


ST4766NM 


5,25 


3,25X5,75X8 


15 


15.5 


SCSI 


RLL 


150,000 


$1,995 




676 


ST4766NV 


5,25 


3.25X5,75X8 


15 


15,5 


SCSI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




676 


ST4767E 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


11.9 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




676 


ST4767N 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


11.9 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


150,000 


$2,179 




676 


ST4767NM 


5,25 


3,25X575X8 


15 


n.9 


SCSi-2 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




676 


ST4767NV 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


11.9 


SCSI-2 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




691 i 


ST4769E 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


12.9 


ESDI 


RLL 


150.000 


n/a 




1050 


ST412O0N 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


15 


15 


SCSI 


ZBR 


150,000 


$2,695 




1050 


ST412O0NM 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


15 


SCSJ 


ZBR 


150.000 


n/a 




1050 


ST41200W 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


15 


SCSI 


ZBR 


150.000 


n/a 




1352 


ST4t520N 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X9.9 


1 


11.5 


SCSI-2 


ZBR 


150.000 


n/a 




1352 


ST41600N 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


1 


1t.5 


SCSt-2 


ZBR 


150,000 


n/a 




1420 


ST41650N 


5.25 


3.25X5.75X8 


IS 


15 


SCSI-2 


ZBR 


150.000 


n/a 




1420 


ST41650ND 


5.25 


3,25X5.75X8 


15 


15 


SCSI-2 


ZBR 


150,000 


n/a 




2100 


ST42400N 


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COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




PROGRAMMING POWER 



TOM CAMPBELL 



I've seen so much hype the last few 
years that Fve been skeptical of 
some innovations that were actual- 
ly worthwhile. If you're the same 
way, you might be wondering whether 
you should learn C++. 

This month Fll try to illustrate 
why C++ lives up to all its publicity. 
I think it's well worth your time to 
learn, and I'll show you some of its 
new features. Fll finish by explaining 
when you shouldn't use C++. 

What's New? 

C++ is a highly compatible superset 
of ANSI C. In fact, many of ANSI Cs 
features came from C+ +, which it- 
self is now the subject of an ANSI 
standardization effort. Void, const, 
and function prototypes are three 
such examples. 

Void lets you create generic 
pointers, a cleaner and semantically 
more acceptable solution than using 
char *, and it lets you create functions 
that don't return a value^ustlike a 
procedure in Pascal. 

Const tags variables so that opti- 
mizers won't remove them improper- 
ly. Function prototypes, like the 
FORWARD of Pascal or the DE- 
CLARE of QuickBASIC, assure that 
functions use the correct type and 
number of parameters. Optional in C, 
they're required in C+ +. 

Object Lessons 

The most important additions to 
standard C are object orientation and 
operator overloading. Objects are like 
structures that can include functions; 
more important, their traits can be in- 
herited by other objects. 

Objects are difficult to design and 
can't be hacked quickly (because bad 
object design can ruin a program long 
before you know it), but they make 
program maintenance an order of 
magnitude easier. 

I don't believe, as many do, that 
objects alone speed development 
time, although I believe that a begin- 
ner taught correct C++ would make 
far fewer mistakes than a beginner 
taught C. 



But objects do speed mainte- 
nance time, because you can combine 
them with operator overloading to 
make your code conform more closely 
to what it's actually doing. 

Operator overloading means that 
most operators, such as +, », and 
^ = , can be redefined to operate on 
user-defined data types. For example, 
FORTRAN can deal with complex 
numbers, but C can't. 




In C, you'd create a structure 
called complex and a number of func- 
tions to operate on them — multiply, 
divide, and so on. To add two com- 
plex numbers, you'd create a function 
called add( ), and invoke it like this: 

complex cl, c2; 

add(cl, c2); 

In C+ +, you can add complex num- 
bers to the repeioire of + and do this: 

complex cl, c2; 

// The plus operator now works on 

complex numbers. 
// Note that single-line comments can 

start with"//'' 
// and don't need to be terminated. 



cl = cl + c2; 

The cout class, which works 
much more like BASIC'S PRINT than 
Cs printfl; ), uses the << operator. 
Objects plus operator overloading 
mean that you can create, say, a 
records-and-f ields object called Da- 
tum, and then inherit its qualities in a 
CustomerRecord object, overload the 
« operator for displaying records, 
and wnd up with this code: 

CustomerRecord NewRecord; 

cout « "New customer: \ n'* « 
CustomerRecord; 

If this is hard to understand, 
translate it to C. Imagine being able to 
do this in C: 

CustomerRecord NewRecord; 

printf("New customer: \ n %z", 
CustomerRecord); 

where %z is an imaginary print speci- 
fication for values of type Customer- 
Record, which could contain numeric, 
text, or binary values. 

Avoiding the Routine 

One of my favorite additions to C is 
call by reference — like Pascal's V^R 
or QuickBASIC's parenthesized SUB 
parameters. It makes program main- 
tenance a zillion times easier by elimi- 
nating the need for those pesky 
indirection operators. 

Here's a trivial example that 
squares a number. Note that it 
changes the value of a without making 
you call the routine with &a and with- 
out requiring tons of *a indirections 
within the function. This single- 
handedly removes one of Cs most 
difficult-to-learn and worst-conceived 
traits. 

#include <iostream,h> 

// The & gives C call by reference, 

void Square(]nt & Value) 

{ 
// Just square it. The "&" lets this 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 67 



D 




ROGRAMMING POWER 



look more natural. 
Value = Value * Value; 



} 



void main( ) 

{ 

// Request a number, 
cout « "Enter an integer. "; 
// Allocate a variable for it. 
inta; 

// Get it from the keyboard, 
cin » a; 

// Square it. Notice no "&'\ 
Square{a); 
// Display its value. 
cout « *^Squared, it's '' « a; 
} 

I/O in the Stream 

If you're a C programmer, you proba- 
bly use the line ^include <stdio,h> 
routinely, not even thinking twice. 
When you program in C+ +, you 
have to think twice. 

Stdio.h has been superseded by 
iostream.h, which supplements the 
concepts of standard input and stand- 
ard output considerably, refining 
greatly the concept of streams that be- 
gan with C. (Note here that you can 
easily distinguish current from outdat- 
ed texts by their use of stream. h, the 
predecessor to iostream used in C+ + 
before version 2.) 

Iostream. h is as great an im- 
provement on stdio.h as Cs elegant 
file I/O was on ever>'thing that pre- 
ceded it. In fact, some of it is actually 
as powerful as . . . BASIC 

Fve often complained that C, 
with the advantage of a decade's hind- 
sight, made you jump through hoops 
just to print common values. C+ + 
goes BASIC one better by offering all 
the flexibility of PRINT and PRINT 
USING with the ability to customize 
their behavior completely. 

Here's an example. The user is 
prompted for an integer. .After it's 
been entered at the keyboard, the val- 
ue is displayed in both decimal and 
hex, embedded in a message. 

#include <iostream,h> 
void main( ) 



{ 



cout « "Please enter an integer. "; 
// Note declaration occurring after 

executable code. 
int Num; 
// Accept the number from the 

keyboard. 



cin » Num; 

// Display it in decimal and hex. 

cout « "That number is " « Num 

« " decimal, and " « hex « 

Num « " hex."; 
} 

Notice how Num is declared 
right where it's needed, whereas C re- 
quires declarations to appear before 
executable code. More interesting is 
hex, which is called a manipulator. 

Manipulators affect the behavior 
of a stream. In this case, the default 
appearance of numbers in decimal 
form is neatly overidden, and the 
numbers are displayed as hex values 
instead. 

Built-in manipulators include dec 
and ocl; setw, which sets a delfault 
width for output values; fill, which 
lets you set the fill character (which is 
normally a space); setprecision, which 
determines the precision to which 
floating-point numbers are displayed; 
and others. Manipulators give you 
even greater power than PRINT 
USING with the bonus that you can 
alter the preset behavior of streams. 

Getting an A+ + 

If you're looking for books that teach 
C++, here*s how to shop effectively. 
Try to get some sense from the book 
jacket that the author has been pro- 
gramming in C+ + for a few years 
and didn't learn it just to write the 
book. 

Make sure the book is for version 
2.0 or 2. 1 and not for earlier versions. 
Make sure it covers at least the follow- 
ing topics: operator overloading, func- 
tion overloading, memory manage- 
ment (including new, delete, _new_ 
handler, and set_new_handler), the 
this pointer, references, inheritance 
and multiple inheritance, and the 
iostream class. All of these are medi- 
um- or advanced-level topics, but they 
form a kernel of knowledge no C+ + 
programmer should be without. 

I can vouch for a couple of en- 
tries in this alreadv-crowded market. 

Teach Yourself, . . C+ + by Al 
Stevens (MIS Press, P.O. Box 30135, 
Salt Lake City, Utah 84139; 800-247- 
3912; $29.95) is well written, fairly 
free of typos, and obviously written by 
a C++ stud. 

Another surprisingly good trea- 
tise is the Boriand C++ tutorial {Bor- 
land C+-r, Borland International, 



1 800 Green Hills Road, Scotts Valley, 
California 95066-0001; 408-438-8400; 
S495), a near book-length introduc- 
tion that docs an excellent job of cov- 
ering the fundamentals. Both come 
with the example code on disk, and 
both require that you be reasonably 
familiar with C before starting. 

When to Avoid C+ + 

Now it's time to gaze at the dark side 
of the force — when to avoid C+ + . 
First, plan for your next several pro- 
jects to take much longer to code than 
they would in C. 

Designing maintainable, extensi- 
ble classes takes a ver>^ long time. So 
does learning when to apply new pro- 
gramming paradigms. Just knowing 
the features of C+ + doesn't mean 
you know when to put them to work. 
However, maintaining your code will 
be a lot easier. 

Second, bear in mind that mov- 
ing your code to non-PC systems may 
be impossible. C++ has not been in 
widespread use for long. That means 
you may end up paying to beta test for 
the next implementation you use — 
without volunteering. 

It's difficult enough to find ANSI 
C implementations on some systems; 
many administrators don't even know 
what C++ is. 

Third and last, note that C+ + 
isn't as standardized as ANSI C. 
While the ANSI C standard library 
must be included for an implementa- 
tion to call itself ANSI, C+ + is too 
new for that. 

Each implementation of C+ + 
tends to come with a library that in- 
cludes linked lists, bags, queues, col- 
lections, and trees. But none of these 
is required, so plan to do a lot of 
wheel-inventing for the time being. 

While I've tried to get across 
some of the best features of C+ +, 
I've barely scratched the surface. 

If you want to find a good job 
programming in C, or if you have a 
big project coming up and are decid- 
ing on an implementation language, 
you should use C++. 

It makes software easier to main- 
tain (if the maintainer knows C+ + 1), 
makes your code look more like your 
algorithms (finally — your code can 
match a line of pseudocode like "Print 
value," where value isn't a scalar 
type), and knowing it makes you a 
more desirable employment prospect. Q 



COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




TIPS & TOOLS 



H 



NTS 



AND 



TIPS 



FROM 



OUR 



READERS 



In the February' issue of COM- 
PUTE, Caroline Hanlon stressed 
the importance of saving your sys- 
tem setup in case of later problems. 
She suggested writing the system set* 
up information on a 3 X 5 card. This 
is fine, but there is a better method of 
saving your system setup information. 

Below are two BASIC programs 
that save and restore the system setup 
information. To run the save pro- 
gram, type BASIC or GWBASIC 
SAVECMOS, When you run SAVE 
CMOS.BAS, the system setup infor- 
mation is saved to a file called 
CMOS,Il.AM. Since you won't be able 
to boot from your hard drive if the 
system setup is trashed, you should 
copy the programs, the CMOS. RAM 
file, and BASIC to a floppy disk for- 
matted with the /s option to make the 
disk bootable. To restore the system 
information, boot from the floppy, 
and enter BASIC or GWBASIC 
RESTCMOS. 

SAVECMOS.BAS 

10 DEFINT A-Z:DIM CMOS(63) 
20FORI=lTO63:OUTn2,I 
30 CMOS(I) - NP(113):NEXT I 
40 OPEN "CMOS.RAM" FOR 

OUTPUT AS #1 
50FORI=lTO63:WRITE#l, 

CMOS(I) 
60 NEXT I 
70 CLOSE #1;SYSTEM 

RESTCMOS.BAS 

10 DEFINT A-Z:DIM CMOS(63) 

20 OPEN "CMOS.RAM" FOR INPUT 

AS#1 
30 FOR 1= 1 TO 63:INPUT #1, CMOS(I) 
40 NEXT I:€LOSE #1 
SO FOR I = 1T0 63:0UT112,I 
60 OUT 113, CM0S{1):NEXT I 
70 SYSTEM 

You'll need to enter your setup to 
correct the date and time information, 
but all the other information should 
be correct. If you use DOS 3,3 or high- 
er, use the DATE and TIME com- 
mands instead of running setup. 



These commands change the date and 
time in CMOS for you. 

Vincent O'Connor 
Babbitu MN 

Cheap Format 

Eve recently discovered a way to low- 
level format my hard drive without 
buying an expensive low-level format- 
ting program. Owners of IBM PS/2s 
can use this undocumented tool 
Make a backup of your hard 
drive. Insert the IBM Personal Sys- 
tem/2 Reference disk in drive A and 
turn on the computer. When the menu 
appears, press Clrl-A. Youll see the 
undocumented advanced menu. Here 
you can either run an advanced and 
more rigorous check of your computer 
or low-level format the hard drive. 

Jason Shultz 
Harrison, AR 

Windows 3.0 Swapfile 

Windows 3.0 running in 386 en- 
hanced mode can make use of virtual 
memory, a process whereby Windows 
can handle a memory full condition 
by swapping data temporarily out to 
disk. If you want to run 3MB worth of 
programs but only have 2.5 MB of 
RAM free, no problem. Windows in 
the 386 enhanced mode can send 
.5MB to disk temporarily, using the 
disk as if it were memory. This is a 
good bargain because disk space is less 
expensive than RAM, but its Achilles 
heel is speed. It can be quite slow. 

One way to speed up virtual 
memory is to preallocate space on 
disk as a permanent file for this swap- 
ping process. That way, you save the 
file setup and breakdown time, and 
the file can be contiguous, making ac- 
cess faster. 

That's what the Windows pro- 
gram SWAPFILE does; it sizes and al- 
locates a permanent swapfile. It's 
discussed in the back of the Windows 
manual, so most people have never 
created a swapfile, even if they're run- 
ning Windows on a 386. 

SWAPFILE.EXE is located in the 
C: \ WINDOWS \ SYSTEM sub- 
directory. You'll only run the program 



once, in order to create the file. When 
you do run SWAPFILE, it must be 
run under Windows in real mode^ so 
run it from the command Une. 

WIN /r C: \ WINrK)WS \ SYSTEM 
\SWAPFILE.EXE 

Follow the prompts. It's worth taking 
the few minutes to create a swap file. 
You'll see the improvement in per- 
formance when running memory- 
hungry programs. 

Mark Minasi 
Arlington, VA 

Dump dBase IV Logo 

For ^^£15^ /F developers and users, if 
you are sick of seeing the dBase IV 
logo every time you run the program, 
add the /T toggle switch to the com- 
mand line. DBA /T will eliminate the 
dBase logo. 

Jim Reece 
Tucson, AZ 

Shrinking a BASIC EXE 

Here are some notes on how to trim 
down and speed up your compiled 
BASIC programs. These are all brute- 
force but often highly effective tech- 
niques that don't require a huge 
amount of brainpower. 

Avoid ON statements and back- 
ground music. Any ON statement 
slows down the program significantly 
because its condition must be checked 
after each statement executes. On the 
other hand, ON statements provide 
unparalleled ease of use and predate 
event-driven languages by a decade. 

Use DEFINT and integer vari- 
ables. By default, BASIC uses real 
numbers for its variables — numbers 
with an exponent and decimal point. 
If you can keep your calculations to 
integer values, they'll speed up im- 
mensely. This really shows up in 
games, where moving objects around 
the screen and figuring out their loca- 
tions represent a huge investment of 
computer time. 

Use PowerBASIC'% smart Unking. 
PowerBASlCXtls you trim out great 
chunks of your program with its smart 



JULY 1991 COMPUTE 




TIPS & TOOLS 



linking. This lets you jettison the parts 
of the runtime library your program 
doesn't use, giving you the option to 
remove things Uke communications 
code, screen drivers for graphics, and 
so on. This can cut a 50K program in 
half 

Some speed-up tricks that work 
with GW-BASIC won't work at all in 
the compiled versions. Taking out 
REMs won't help because they never 
make it into the compiled version 
anyway, but they do cost in interpret- 
ed BASIC Putting often-used GOTO 
labels at the top of the program will 
speed up a GW-BASIC program be- 
cause any GOTO causes the interpret- 
er to rewind the program and search 
line numbers starting from the very 
first one. On the other hand, any 
GOTO, regardless of its location, 
compiles to a single machine instruc- 
tion in compiled BASIC, and the tar- 
get location doesn't matter. Finally, 
reducing the lengths of variable 
names — a useful and speed-improv- 
ing trick in GW-BASIC — means noth- 
ing in compiled BASIC because the 
variable names are converted to ad- 
dresses and thrown out at compile 
time. Like REM statements, they 
cease to be an issue when compiled. 

Tom Campbell 
Irvine, CA 

Large File Copy 

Have you ever come across a file too 
large to fit on a single floppy disk? 
Sometimes even compressing a file 
doesn't help, especially database files. 
There's a way to split a file and place 
the parts on separate floppies. Later 
the file can be restored to the original 
file. DOS provides this easy solution 
if you don't have a program that's spe- 
cifically written to handle the prob- 
lem. You can use the DOS BACKUP 
command by entering the following: 

BACKUP source drive: \path \ 
filename destination drive: \path 

Follow the instructions displayed on 
the screen. When you're ready to reas- 
semble your file, use the DOS RE- 
STORE command. 

RESTORE destination drive: source 
drive: 

Both BACKUP and RESTORE are 
external DOS commands. This means 



that the files BACKUREXE and 
RESTORE.EXE must be available to 
the system at execution time. The files 
must be located in the current directo- 
ry, in a directory listed in your PATH 
statement in your AUTOEXEC.BAT 
file, or on a disk in the current drive. 
Be careful using this method between 
different computers, though. Some 
files that have been backed up with one 
version of DOS refuse to be restored 
under another version of DOS. Try it 
out with an unimportant file first, 

AndvLin 
West H ilk CA 

Batch Shortcut 

I've created a batch file that allows me 
to change to any directory on my hard 
drive with a minimum of keystrokes. 
I also included the DIR command so 
that when I change to a directory, a di- 
rectory listing of specified files is dis- 
played. This command line parameter 
is optional. The batch filename is 
G.BAT, and the syntax for its use is as 
follows: 

G directory abbreviation [file spec] 

ECHO OFF 

IF " '^ = = ^'^l" GOTO HELP 

IFL==%1 GOTO LOTUS 

IF I ==%1 GOTO LOTUS 

IFW==%1G0T0WP 

IFw==%lG0T0WP 

IFD==%1 GOTO DBASE 

IF d==%l GOTO DBASE 

:HELP 

ECHO You must enter a directory 

abbreviation. 

ECHO S>Titax: G director)' abbreviation 

[file spec] 

GOTO END 

:LOrUS 

C: 

CD \ LOTUS 

GOTO DIRECTORY 

:VVP 

C: 

CD WVORD 

GOTO DIRECTORY 

;DBASE 

C: 

CD \ DBASE 

:DIRECTORY 

IF "^'--"%2" GOTO END 

DIR /P %2 

;END 

You should change the batch file to 
match the directories on your hard 



drive. Using a batch file such as this 
one can save lots of environment 
space, especially if your hard drive is 
filled with a lot of directories. You 
don't have to list the directories in 
this file in your PATH statement. 

John N orris 
Pasadena, TX 

Mouse Hot Seat 

If your optical mouse doesn't work 
properly sometimes and your com- 
puter is located in a sunny room, the 
problem may be direct sunlight falling 
on the mouse. 

Optical mice keep track of move- 
ment by shining an LED at a receptor 
through a notched disk that moves 
when the mouse is moved. Other 
sources of light can confuse the sensor 
into thinking that the mouse isn't 
moving at all because the light isn't 
interrupted, a condition which the 
mouse interprets as movement. 

In ambient light, the mouse's 
cover is usually enough to prevent un- 
wanted light from reaching the sensor, 
but direct sunlight can be strong 
enough to shine through the case, par- 
ticularly if it's white plastic. (I have 
experienced this problem with a 
mouse manufactured by Kraft, which 
has been perfect otherwise.) 

The obvious solution is to move 
your mouse out of the sun or hold the 
mouse so your hand completely cov- 
ers it. If you like your computer where 
it is and Uke the way you hold your 
mouse, it's a simple matter to remove 
the mouse cover and either cover the 
inside with electrical tape or paint the 
inside black. It shouldn't be necessary 
to completely cover the inside with 
tape or paint— just a little darkening 
over the ball should do the trick. 

It may be something to try if you 
have a mouse which seems to work 
perfectly at night but poorly during 
the brightest parts of the day. 

Michael Stowe 
Yellow Springs, OH 

If you have an interesting tip that you 
think would help other PC users, send 
it along with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to COM- 
PUTERS PC Hot Tips, 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. For each tip we 
publish, we'll pay vou $25~$50 and 
send you a COMPUTERS PC LCD 
clock radio while supplies last. B 



70 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




PC DISK UPDATE 



JOYCE SIDES 



for those of you who couldn't read 
the documentation file for ASIC 
(February 1991) from CMOS, in- 
stall /15/Cand then use Turbo- 
TYPE (located on the April disk as 
T.EXE) to read the documentation 
file. Enter T drive: \path \ ASIC 
.DOC at the DOS prompt to read the 
file. Make sure T.EXE is on the disk 
in the current drive or directory when 
you run the program. 

CMOS Windows? 

We've been tossing around the idea 
here at COMPUTE of enhancing 
CMOS (COMPUTE'S Menu Operat- 
ing System), We'd like to know what 
you think about a Windows 3.0 
version. 

The program would still work on 
nongraphics systems, but there would 
be a version that would have the look 
and feel of Windows graphics with 
buttons and scroll bars. Drop us a line 
to let us know what you think. 

Off Track 

If you get the error message Advanced 
feature unavailable in line no line in 
module DSKTRK 45 at address 
0654:44DC when you run DISK- 
TI14K (December 1990), you proba- 
bly have an early version of DOS 
that's incompatible with the program. 
DISKTRAK works with DOS versions 
3.0 or higher. If you get this message, 
you1l want to check the DOS version 
you're using. To do this^ enter VER 
command at the DOS prompt. 

On Track 

The author of DISKTRAK. Birk Bin- 
nard, has a new version of the pro- 
gram. The version published on the 
December 1990 COMPUTERS PC 
Disk was version 4.50. The new ver- 
sion is 5. 10 and can be downloaded 
from CompuServe in area 6 of the 
IBM Utilities forum. The filename is 
DSKTRK51.ZIP. 

If you don't have a CompuServe 
account, send a formatted disk plus 
$0.50 for postage in a reusable disk 
mailer, and Mr. Binnard will send you 
a shareware copy of the new version. 



If youVe already registered the 
program, send $5 to cover the cost of 
the disk, disk mailer, and postage. If 
you haven't registered but would like 
to, send $ 1 5 to register the program 
and receive the new version. Send 
your order to Peninsula Software, 
28510 Blythewood Drive, Palos 
Verdes, California 90274. 

The new version of DISKTR/IK 
includes PATH support, a Restore 
function, enhanced comment editing, 
new printer controls, increased win- 
dow size for Delete and Restore func- 
tions, and bug corrections. 




Po/y-no-Copy 

After I received phone calls from sev- 
eral readers about a problem with 
Po/i'Copy (February 1991), I called Jo- 
seph Albanese, the author of the pro- 
gram. Some users complained of 
getting the message Drive A not sup- 
ported when they ran the program. 

Mr. Albanese said that he was 
aware of problems with PolyCopy 
running on the PS/2 Model 50z, the 
PS/2 Model 70/25 MHz, and also 
DTK machines. 

He's working on the solution. If 
you've had trouble with the program, 
please contact Mr, Albanese and give 



him any pertinent information about 
your computer system such as the 
type and brand of computer, the ver- 
sion of DOS, and BIOS. Send inqui- 
ries to Joseph M. Albanese, P.O. Box 
1 157, Bassett, Virginia 24055. You 
can also contact him through his BBS 
at (703) 666-9535. 

Mis-C4LC-ulatron 

COMPUTECalc (February 1991) may 
not work on some Tandy computers. 
The program works in DOS 3.0 or 
higher, not on DOS 2. 1 or higher as 
stated in the magazine and in CMOS. 

The program may also not work 
with any mouse that is not 100-per- 
cent Microsoft compatible, such as a 
Genius mouse. However, you can still 
use the keyboard with the calculator, 
or you can install the mouse in Micro- 
soft-compatible mode by pressing 
both mouse buttons when the com- 
puter boots. A Microsoft message 
should appear when the mouse driver 
loads. 

Unfortunately, the Genius mouse 
isn't completely Microsoft compati- 
ble, so even this trick may not work, 
but it's certainly worth a try. 

Sweet Memory 

Sometimes the Run option is offered 
in CMOS for a program, but when 
you run it, you gel a beep and an error 
message that says Out ofMemoiy, 

If this happens to you, exit the 
menu to DOS and rerun CMOS. 
Some programs don't release memory 
after they've run, so when the pro- 
gram returns to CMOSznd. you try to 
run another program, the memory 
isn't available. 

You can install the program and 
run it from DOS without problems. 

PATHS to Ponder 

Make sure that you change the PATH 
to the correct director>^ when you run 
AC Hunter (February 1 99 1 ). The 
PATH option is displayed on the 
opening menu when you first run the 
program. If you run it from drive A, 
enter A: \ when the program prompts 
you for the correct PATH. s 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 71 




NTRODOS 



TONY ROBERTS 



A properly tuned CONHG.SYS 
helps your svslem run smoothlv. 
With CONFIG.SYS out of bal- 
ance, however, you'll waste 
memory in the best case, or have 
trouble running some programs in the 
worst case. 

Many users avoid CONFIG.SYS 
except when directed by software in- 
stallation procedures to make some 
change, usually to the BUFFERS or 
FILES commands. These suggestions 
are designed to ensure that the new 
software works properly under the 
heaviest imaginable load. If you don't 
push your software to its absolute lim- 
it, you may be able to scale back these 
settings. 

Although the memory- you 
can save by judiciously refining 
CONFIG .SYS commands amounts 
to only a few thousand bytes, this is 
sometimes enough to allow the coex- 
istence of memory-resident utilities 
and programs that otherwise seem 
incompatible. 

The FILES command specifies 
the maximum number of files that 
can be open at any one time. Al- 
though it may appear that very few 
files are open, there's more going on 
than meets the eye. If you start your 
word processing program with a batch 
file, for example, the batch file is 
open, the word processing program is 
open, the file you are editing is open, 
and other auxiHar>' files such as print- 
er drivers or spelling dictionaries may 
be open. 

DOS uses 64 bytes of memor>' to 
track the status of each open file. It 
sets aside this block of memory based 
on the HLES statement in CONHG 
.SYS. If you specify FILES- 20, DOS 
reserves 1280 bytes regardless of how 
many files are actually open. 

If the FILES allocation is loo 
small, DOS alerts you with a Too 
many files open message when it runs 
out of slots in which to track files. 

To find the optimum setting for 
FILES, gradually reduce the number 
of files specified in CONFIG.SYS and 
then run your usual software until you 
encounter errors. Then raise the 



FILES setting a little so you can oper- 
ate error free. 

BUFFERS, at 5 12 bytes each, are 
much more memoo^-hungry than 
FILES. A buffer is a block of memory 
used in the exchange of information 
between programs and disks. 

When data is needed from the 
disk, a disk sector is read, and the 
information is placed in a buffer 
where the program can access it. Al- 
though the program often requires 
fewer bytes than the entire 512 bytes 
the sector holds, the extra information 



Wl\ 


1 


vni 


a 


T^t 


iffl 


1 1 


1 d 


WTHCONFG.SYS 



is kept in the buffer in case the pro- 
gram asks for it later. 

When the application makes its 
next request for disk access, the buff- 
ers are checked to see if the appropri- 
ate data is there. If so, the data can be 
accessed immediately without requir- 
ing a slow disk-read operation. 

The most recently read disk data 
is kepi in the buffers, and once all 
buffers are full, the oldest data is 
discarded to make way for new 
information. 

When too few buffers are speci- 
fied in CONFIG.SYS, ihe system will 
be slowed by extra disk accesses. If 
too many buffers are allocated, the 
system loses time churning through 



them before going to the disk. 

Finding the proper number of 
BUFFERS is largely a matter of feeL 
With loo few buffers open, your ma- 
chine will perform sluggishly, but you 
may not need as many buffers as some 
software instructions suggest. This is es- 
pecially true if you use disk caching. 

A disk cache is a more sophisti- 
cated buffering system that manages a 
much larger amount of memory, often 
extended or expanded memory. Some 
disk caches work in conventional 
memory. 

In addition to storing sectors al- 
ready requested by the application 
program, caches commonly perform 
look-ahead buffering. In this scheme, 
the cache reads the requested sector 
plus the next few sectors on the as- 
sumption that those sectors will be 
sought soon. 

Caching programs also make in- 
telligent decisions about what data to 
keep in memory, A well-executed 
cache not only keeps the most recently 
accessed information but also the 
most frequently used. 

One other bit of tuning that helps 
speed up disk access is the FAST- 
OPEN command that came into be- 
ing with DOS 3.3. 

FA.STOPEN creates a director>' 
cache thai speeds up DOS's file-open- 
ing operations. The command, which 
is usually executed in the AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file, has a slightly different 
svntax in DOS 3.3 and DOS 4.0 L 

In DOS 3.3, FASTOPEN 
C:= 100 sets up a 100-entry directory 
cache for disk drive C. In DOS 4.01, 
FASTOPEN C: = ( 100,) accomphshes 
the same result. FASTOPEN only 
works with hard disks. 

Whenever a file opening is re- 
quested, DOS searches the directory 
paih until it locales that file. If FAST- 
OPEN is running, the file's location 
on the disk is recorded in the FAST- 
OPEN cache. If a subsequent request 
for that file is made, DOS can quickly 
look up its location in the FAST- 
OPEN cache rather than having to 
read through all the files in all the di- 
rectories on the directory path. Q 



72 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




HARDWARE CLINIC 



MARK M I N A S I 



Iasl month, I talked about power 
protection and some lower-cost 
power-protection devices. This 
nionth, ril finish the topic with a 
discussion of battery-backup devices. 

In addition to protection from 
short power irregularities, you may 
need backup power. Fve lived in a 
number of places in the northeastern 
United States where summer Hghi- 
ning storms will kill the power for just 
a second — enough to erase your mem- 
ory and make the digital clocks blink. 
Unlike the devices I discussed last 
month, no transformer or MOV (Met- 
al Oxide Varistor) can help you here. 
You need something that has a built- 
in battery, something with enough 
power to carr>' you through until the 
juice comes back on, or at least with 
enough power to allow you to grace- 
fully exit your applications and shut 
off your computer. To that end, there 
are two kinds of devices in this catego- 
ry: SPSS (Standby Power Supplies) 
and UPSs (Uninterruptible Power 
Supplies). Both use batteries, but 
there's a fundamental difference be- 
tween I he ways they use them. 

Not to Worry? 

'"Hang on a minute," I hear you cry. 
"Who needs a UPS? Isn't that over- 
kill?" Actually, Fd say No. 

Here's the bad news: Electrical 
power is getting worse in the United 
States. Nobody wants a power plant 
in his or her backyard, coal-burning 
plants cause acid rain, nukes scare just 
about everybody, and wind/tide/ 
geothermal/you-name-it alternative 
sources of energy aren't really going 
anywhere. We're not building new 
sources of electricity, but we're con- 
tinuing to create new drains on the 
country's power network. Power de- 
mand continues to grow, while electri- 
cal generation capacity grows much 
more slowly. The net result is that 
we're going to see more brownouts, 
blackouts, spikes, and surges through- 
out the 1990s, 

The good news? Uh . . . there 
isn't any. The worid is changing. Ex- 
pect power in our country to take on a 



distinctly Third World look. (How do 
I know? I was a senior economist with 
a national laboratory working for the 
United States Department of Energy 
for several years in the eariy 1980s.) 
From your PC's point of view, electri- 
cal power is like air — it soon dies 
without it, and dirty power makes it 
sick. That could mean permanent 
hardware damage, data loss, or mo- 
mentar>' misreads. 




This all seems strange and coun- 
terintuitive because power in the 
1980s was fairly clean and reliable, 
leading to the common wisdom that 
you just plug your PC into the wall 
and it'll go. Also, most household ap- 
pliances are fairly robust about the 
kind of power they'll accept: Plug a 
toaster in just about an>^here, and it 
works fine. A new consensus will de- 
velop by the mid 1990s that everyone 
needs power protection. 

UPS and Downs 

Your backup options are standby 
power supplies (SPSs) and uninterrup- 
tible power supplies (UPSs). They use 
fundamentally difTerent approaches to 
solving power problems. SPSs charge 
the batteries while watching the cur- 
rent level. (See Figure K) While utility 
power is normal, the S PS is fairly ir- 
relevant, letting spikes, surges, and 
low voltage pass right through to your 
PC. A few SPSs have MOVs— the ka- 



mikaze components in surge protec- 
tors that I discussed last month — but, 
in general, they do nothing except 
when the power disappears altogether. 

If the power drops, the SPS acti- 
vates itself and supplies power until 
its batteries run down. (See Figure 2.) 
Note well that a. fast power switch 
must occur here, and it's important to 
find out what the switching time is. 
Four ms or under is fine. In my expe- 
rience, 14 ms isn't fast enough. 

A UPS constantly runs power 
from the line current to a battery, then 
from the battery to the PC. (See Fig- 
ure 3.) This is superior to an SPS be- 
cause there's no switching time 
involved. Also, this means that any 
surges affect the battery-charging 
mechanism, not the computer. A UPS 
is, then, a surge suppressor as well. 

A UPS or SPS has to convert the 
battery's DC current to the AC cur- 
rent that your PC requires, AC is sup- 
posed to look like a sine wave. 
Cheaper UPS and SPS models pro- 
duce square waves. (See Figure 4.) 
Square waves are bad because they in- 
clude high-frequency noise which can 
hamper your computer's operation. 
Worse, some peripherals (printers in 
particular) can't handle square-wave 
.AC; their power supplies bum up. So, 
when examining UPSs, ask whether 
they use square wave or sine wave. 

A sine-wave UPS is the only way 
to really eliminate most power prob- 
lems. The reason everyone doesn't 
have one is cost; a good one costs over 
$ 1 ,000, like the excellent Minuteman 
systems from Para Systems (sine-wave 
MM500/1 UPS— $1,399, AT300 
SPS— $339; 1455 UMay Drive, Car- 
roUton, Texas 75007; 800-238-7272). 

Plan B 

A decent compromise can be found in 
a fast (4 ms) square- wave SPS. I know 
I said square waves are bad for your 
peripherals, but consider this: How 
often will the SPS actually be provid- 
ing power? Not very often — remem- 
ber that it only supplies power when 
the line voltage drops out, which is 
probably not a common occurrence. > 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 73 




HARDWARE CLINIC 



The brief minute or two each month 
of square-wave power that your peri- 
pherals end up getting won't kill them. 
And you'll save a pile of money over a 
UPS. 

On the other hand, remember 
that a UPS is always online and so 
must produce sine- wave output, but 
UPSs have the benefit of providing 
surge protection by breaking down 
and reassembling the power. SPSs 
don't provide this protection; you still 
have to worr>' about surge protection 
when you buy an SPS, but not if you 
buy a UPS, So make the choice that 
your budget allows. 

Or you might buy a unique prod- 
uct, called the InnerSource, from PC 
Power and Cooling Systems (31510 
Mountain Wav, Bonsall California 
92003; 6 1 9-723-95 1 3). The Inner- 
Source replaces your current power 
supply with a combination power sup- 
ply and UPS. It's a nifty device — it 
takes no more space than the power 
supply that*s already in your PC and 
provides 10 to 15 minutes of backup 
power, (It also includes a connector to 
power your monitor,) You get low- 
vollage protection, surge and spike 
proleclion, and blackout insurance — 
all for $395. This isn't a bad deal (as I 
said last month, a decent power con- 
ditioner would cost $200, and this 
does a lot more). And while this 
sounds like a unique idea, every single 
batter>'-powered laptop incorporates 
a similar system — so I suppose you 
could buy only laptops as a means 
of combatting power problems. To 
summarize: 

• If it's an SPS, it must switch in 4 ms 

or less. 

• If it's an SPS, square- wave output is 
acceptable. 

• If it's a UPS, it must have sine-wave 
output. 

Power of Misinformation 

Shopping for a UPS can be a real edu- 
cation — not in power-protection de- 
vices, but in misinformation. You'd 
think Saddam Hussein's public-rela- 
tions minister wrote some of the UPS 
brochures I've seen. One story^ in par- 
ticular really highlights what I mean, 
A few years ago, a power-protec- 
tion company — I won't mention any 
names — ran some full-page ads claim- 
ing to have the answer to low-cost 
power protection: a $200-$300 UPS. 



Ftgure 1: SPS in charging mode 











SPS 






® 








PC 






y 




> 








Battery 
(charging) 


















=igure 2: SPS in discharging mode 






SPS 




® 
® 






PC 






// 










Battery 

(discharging) ! 


^ 
















Figure 3: UPS operation 










UPS 






®- 
® 






Battery 






PC 





























Figure 4: AC waveforins 

vAAAA/^ 

Sine Wave 

mm 

Square Wave 



Wow, I thought, and called them up 

to find out more. I was directed to a 
regional distributor, who took my call 
and did his best to answer my 
questions. 

"This sounds like a terrific deal 
on a UPS," I said. "Does it produce 
sine-wave output or square- wave 
outputT' 

"I'm afraid the information I 
have doesn't include the answer to 
your question," the distributor's tech- 
nical manager replied. He didn't have 
the answers to a lot of other questions, 



so I started smelling a rat. 

So I ventured, *'How about the 
switching time? What's the switching 
time?" 

He perked up, pleased to have the 
answer to a question. "Four millisec- 
onds." he proudly answered, I replied 
that he wasn't selling a UPS, but an 
SPS. His answer? "Oh, you mean it's 
not an online UPS. Yeah, that's true. 
It's not an online UPS." I've heard 
similar dodges from vendors since 
that conversation, so be careful when 
examining power-backup products. H 



74 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




ARTS & LETTERS 



ROBERT BIX BY 



If you want to write a how-to guide 
for using a Windows program or if 
you're creating a presentation based 
on a Windows program, you'll need 
to make screen captures of Windows 
3.0 screens. There are several ways to 
capture text and graphics on your PC, 
but Windows 3.0 presents a bit of a 
challenge. It's different enough from 
earlier versions that the Windows cap- 
ture program you used in the past 
probably won't work with 3.0. 

Microsoft was generous enough 
to provide a built-in capture system 
to suit your needs some of the time. 
This method is similar to the Shift- 
Command-3 combination on the 
Macintosh, which saves the current 
screen as a MacPaint file — although 
the Windows version isn't nearly as 
convenient as the Mac's. 

Pressing PrintScreen while Win- 
dows is running saves the entire 
screen to the Clipboard. (To capture 
only the currently active window, 
press Alt-PrintScreen.) You can then 
paste the graphic into Paintbrush and 
save it as a BMP or PCX file. 

This means that each time you 
capture a screen, you'll have to call up 
Paintbrush to deal with it, which isn't 
a very efficient process and will tire 
you out if you're making more than 
two or three screen dumps. Further- 
more, the Paintbrush canvas is slight- 
ly shon. It isn't tall enough to paste 
the entire Windows 3.0 screen, and 
you'll always end up chopping about a 
quarter of an inch off the bottom. 

In my search for the perfect Win- 
dows screen capture, I discovered Hi- 
jaak{\nst\ Systems, 71 Commerce 
Drive, Brookfield, Connecticut 
06804-3405; 800-828-8088; $199) and 
Collage Phis (Inner Media, 60 Plain 
Road, HoUis, New Hampshire 03049; 
800-962-2949; $129), both recently re- 
leased with Windows 3.0- friendly 
capture programs. Hijaak is primarily 
a graphics conversion program that's 
just what you need for converting 
Macintosh and Amiga graphics to PC 
format or for transferring images 
among PC programs. It includes a 
simple program for capturing screens. 



I got my start capturing Windows 
screens while editing a book on Adobe 
Illustrator for the PC. The program 1 
used then was HoiShot Graphics (Sym- 
Soft, 924 Incline Way, Call Box 5, In- 
cline Village, Nevada 89450; 702-832- 
4300; $249). To signal the Windows 
portion of the program to capture a 
screen, I pressed two keys. The graphic 
was then captured and saved to disk in 
the HotShot native format, HSG, 
which could then be converted to TIF 
or PCX. HotShot would even autoin- 




crement the filename, so I'd wind up 
with a list of easily managed files like 
GRABOOl.HSG, GRAB002.HSG, 
and so forth. 

One problem I had with HotShot 
was that when it converted its native 
format to TIF, it was incompatible 
with most other programs. In order to 
use its output with most other pro- 
grams, I had to convert it to either 
PCX or IMG format. 

Hijaak follows a similar conven- 
tion, grabbing the file at a keypress 
and saving it in a native formal, IGF, 
which can then be converted to PCX 
or another format at the end of the 
session. Not only is the screen capture 
a convenient feature of the program, 
but Hijaak is also the best solution if 
you find yourself converting files fre- 
quently. It offers both a conversion 



environment and a quick and easy 
command line converter. Unfortu- 
nately, Hijaak lacks an autoincre- 
menting feature. It pauses in the 
screen-capture process to give you the 
chance to enter a filename before the 
screen is saved to disk. 

I was even more impressed with 
Collage Plus. Rather than simply hid- 
ing in the background, this program's 
Windows 3.0 capture program fea- 
tures an onscreen window that disap- 
pears momentarily as the screen is 
captured. Collage Plus also offers a se- 
ries of options for the capture file, in- 
cluding color, monochrome, and 
dithered grays. If you choose grays, 
you're given the option of a fine, me- 
dium, or coarse dither, and a slide bar 
for indicating whether you want a 
lighter or darker picture. These op- 
tions won my heart. 

Collage Plus even provides a 
chart in the manual to help you decide 
which screen-capture format should 
work best for your particular applica- 
tion (certain dithering schemes work 
better for scaling operations than 
others). 

But the best news about Collage 
Plus is that it provides a countdown. 
The countdown feature means you 
can set it to snap a picture up to 99 
seconds after the command is given. 
Usually only fiv^ to ten seconds are 
required to call up the dialog box you 
want to illustrate, but the long pause 
adds immeasurably lo the program's 
flexibility. 

Collage Plus will even capture in 
the format you prefer, whether it's 
PCX, TIF, or the BMP format used 
by Windows itself, which eliminates 
the extra step of converting files to the 
format you want. Collage Plus also 
autoincrements for you, so there's vir- 
tually nothing to do with the screen 
capture once you've requested it. 

The screen-capture utility also lets 
you '*fhp" the image or reverse colors. 
There's an option that will let you cap- 
ture the active window rather than the 
whole screen, and it can display an in- 
dicator that will show you how much 
of the screen has been captured. B 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 75 




FAST FORWARD 



DAVID ENGLISH 



I recently attended a seminar on the 
future of computing at a software 
conference, and no one on the 
panel was wilHng lo define the term 
multimedia. As with other squishy 
phrases (user-friendly, ergonomically 
designed, all natural), most of us have 
a general idea of what we're talking 
about when we use the terms — but 
don't ask us to be loo precise. When 
the phrase desktop publishing was in- 
troduced in 1984, it was squishy. But 
as actual products flooded the market, 
we were able to separate the practical 
uses from the industry hype. 

In the case of multimedia, the 
confusion is compounded by the fact 
that it isn't a market or a single appli- 
cation, but a group of six related tech- 
nologies that have become affordable 
at the same time. 

Three of these six technologies 
are extensions of past PC advances^ — 
high-resolution graphics (VG.A. or bet- 
ter), an affordable device for realistic 
sound (the Sound Blaster and similar 
sound cards), and a standard graphi- 
cal user interface ( Windows 3.0). The 
three other technologies are relatively 
new to the PC world — faster and less 
expensive CD-ROM players, full- 
motion video, and sophisticated, yet 
easy-to-use, authoring systems for 
multimedia applications. 

Joined together, these six tech- 
nologies form the foundation for 
what we know as multimedia. You 
don't even need all six to qualify — 
just about any combination of three 
or more will do. Let's take a brief 
look at these technologies and see 
how each has evolved. 

Over the last few years, VGA has 
become the de facto video-card stand- 
ard, especially its two high-resolution 
modes— 320 X 200 with 256 colors, 
and 640 X 480 with 16 colors. In ad- 
dition, Windows makes it easy for 
software companies to support even 
higher-resolution modes. A card man- 
ufacturer can write a single driver that 
will work with any present or future 
Windows program. This allows multi- 
media developers to use photograph- 
ic-quality images in their applications 



and maintain a high degree of com- 
patibility over the various high-reso- 
lution modes. We've come a long way 
on our journey from four-color CO A 
to the 1 6.7 million colors of the new 
24-bit cards. 

Sound has undergone an equally 
dramatic transformation. While 
many programs still rely on simple 
PC beeps, Microsoft has established a 
sound-card standard with Multi- 
media Windows, which allows any 
Windows application to play real 
sounds through your PC. As with 
video cards, sound-card manufactur- 




ers need to write only one driver in 
order to support all Windows pro- 
grams, and software developers only 
have to deal with a single sound-card 
standard. 

All of these high-resolution im- 
ages and real sounds take up a lot of 
disk space — too much even for a hard 
drive. Enter CD-ROM, which can 
store as much as 650 megabytes on a 
disc. While the current crop of CD- 
ROM players are faster than ever, 
Microsoft has set an even higher 
standard ( 1 5 OK per second) for Multi- 
media Windows, These units are able 
to maintain their higher speeds by 
using a buffer to hold frequently read 
information. A year ago, CD-ROM 



players were S800-$ 1 ,000. Today, you 
can buy them for as little as $400. 

The main reason Microsoft in- 
sisted that CD-ROM players be so fast 
is full-motion video. With a speedy 
CD-ROM player, a PC can spool im- 
ages off of a CD-ROM disc fast 
enough to display a video sequence in 
a small window without any flicker 
(or a video in a full-screen window 
with only a little flicker). A multi- 
media program could display a person 
in a small window explaining the ac- 
tion in another window. As long as 
the windows aren't too large, a 1 50K 
per second CD-ROM player can han- 
dle them. All-talking, all-moving pic- 
tures (and animation) may soon be 
appearing on a PC near you. 

Multimedia applications are only 
as good as the development tools that 
create them. Fortunately, we*re seeing 
a bumper crop of reasonably priced 
authoring systems (most under Win- 
dows) that are both powerful and easy 
to use. The majority of these pro- 
grams use the HyperCard model, al- 
lowing you to associate visual objects 
with programming code and literally 
move those objects into place with 
your mouse. 

At this time, it looks as though 
the common platform for all of these 
technologies will be Multimedia Win- 
dows. With Multimedia Windows, 
you can link various applications to- 
gether. For example, you could have 
one program grab an animation from 
a CD-ROM disc so that a second pro- 
gram could use it in a multimedia pre- 
sentation. At the same time, a third 
program could grab the CD-ROM's 
MIDI data so that a fourth program 
(in this case, a MIDI sequencer pro- 
gram) could feed the musical data to a 
sound card and a MIDI synthesizer. 

Because Multimedia Windows 
has the necessary programming hooks 
and standards for these technologies, 
it will ultimately be the means for 
making multimedia less squishy. 
Look for a steady stream of products 
over the next twelve months that will 
define what mukimedia is and what it 
will become in the future. E 



76 



COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



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SPREADSHEET 



J As-Easy*As (2S5) A fantastic Ldtjs ■ -2 3 compatibe sp^eadshee? program. 

J lotus lyiacros (265) ■ A coissctto" ot powerftji macftjs for i 2- 3 o' compat'-b^e pfOfiraffl*. 

_t Lotus Templaies (269) - Lois £j{ \ise\a temoaies tor Lotus compat pte programs. 

J Pivflt! (282} - PfifTt your sp^eadsreets s C-ewayS- Dal-r^atn^ p^mter n^etfed 



WORD PROGESStNG 



J PC-Wrile 3.03 (325-337) Fij!!-!eatured wofd pfOcess<iftg with spell; checKirrg :- > 

J WP 5.0 5.1 Art GraphtdS (375.376) A o g co ect.on of c(>p 3T ^nages lor WorpPertti ; 

J WP 5-0 Learning System (380,381) ■ Lea'n to use Wo:aPerti>ct 5 CfJicWy and aa^ ; 

J WP 5-0 5,1 Macros (385,386} • Over 100 exceiier-t tracros tor WordPertect- \c *i.vS' 

J Readability Plus (804) Heiips you ma ten your wrstsng sty e IP me ' ^*^^^^5"j^g"5^^ 

UTtLITIES 

J 4 DOS {415) ' Acds many new and en^-anced commanps lo DOS HQ 

J Disk Spool It {416} Sets up a ^^\ spoot<ng enviroflm^BRt wtiete pnnteo outpuT is spco-'ed to dss<, HD 

J HO Backup (424) An easy-louse o^ogram t^ai tjacks up youf hard dr ve on floppy ^i%K% HO 

J List 7.3 (430} • Tf'e Past t:;e vtew^g utili'y &ver created' A must-have program. 
J Meslerkeys (436) - Dtsk muili-ulr^ty ike Norton Uiihines YoLJil usw this one a lo!^ 
J Tree View (472} ■ A supersor DOS cofrrnard shell w;iti pu'J-down rrsenus. 
J Vtfuscan (473} - Scans (he enyre corrfjutef system for virjses E^celte^!' 



gpMPATtQN 



J AlgebfBx (604) Ar^ excellent aEgebra tiilor for ihu beg* "rung to advanced student CCA 
J Computer/ DOS Tuiof (609) - Makes ieaming to use the computer easy ~ and tL/n' 
J Formula 1 (610) ■ An ej<celfent a^getsra tyior that teaches numbers, fractions, anp qjaoraiic equations. 
_j Animated Math (611) - Grves animated re* a rd^ as t Teacres cct;nt;-^g Hf-o Ta:h \q k:35 - ■:"K HD&ijA 
J PC-GSoasary (616) ■ A great sojrce o* t^jrxifecisDtdei:nit:nns ^".c erpi^-aTJons cf cDTCJjitr !e:rr-.rtCiOQy. 
J Googot Matti (629) ■ A n^i^ 'i^a^r-r^ system witti g^sat grapfi-cs ana sev^era* levels o' OtMouity. CCiA 
J PC-FastType (637) Watch yoiif WPM soar as you practice wtf^ rrns interactive typing ;eachef CGA 
J Play 'n Leam (545) ■ .'^ collection o^ six learniing games fo' sm,aii chHdren 2-5 years, tiiik 
J School Mom (654) Lessons on main art, muse, and spelling lor ctii dren 2- ^^2 yea's old. CGA 
J Speed Read (665) ■ Tttaches you thu? pr-nctpies and cortcepts pf speed reading, 
J Total Recall (671) A inerj cr ven ear^n ng ervi'onmen! that leps yeti earn a mast any sud^ect 
_j Typing Teacher (673) - HeTps yoj pracuce ana imD^ove' Traces arid C'spiays your O'ogress 
J Our Unrted Stales (677) A t[;n y s t'v^a game with cju^stions about each state, 
J Verbal Vanquish (680) - Teacnes tesi-taktng strategies for !he veftla^ portion of enfarce exams. ^'.2'^ 
J Animated Alphabet (6S5-68S) These co^orfuJ animations teach children ihe alpha bei. f4 i*iEta} £<iA 
J World (690) - A tasctrasmg e'ectronic datat^ase of wof id geography 
I J Magic Crayon (691) ■ AHows dridren to explore and expenmer^t with colors and shapes EGA, nioi;^ 



APPLICATIONS 



J Trip Planner (765) - flan a deta-*ed trip wi;n this fan;as::C coTiputenjed ^cad.map. 

J PC-Musician {789} - Compose, edit- and pNiy back your rr.jsicai crt-atcns 

_l Astrology (802) ■ le\ tnis program teach you about Western and Easte'n as-troiogy 

J Earth Watch (830) A real t r^e novir^ Wecaio- Projed'On map ot the worrd CG* 

J Lotto! (832) See if yojr co-npjter car nelp yoj Whr tt^e lottery. 

J Resume srtop (852) This pr&gram Helps you wnie a betle'- mote effectn-e resume. 

J Stress Management System (660) Analyses your stress and teaches you to recogniro warn rig signs 

J Wisdom of the Ages (862-065) Over 6000 qyota« ttom msiory's greatest minds '/< df;;t li) 




HOME & FAMILY 



J 



GRAPHICS 

J Dratt Choice (509) An e utelfert menu-driven CAD pfogram witn optional mouse S Jpport 

J Finger Paint (52 1 } Use your keybPSrd (era mous^} tP cravv great co'or pictured CG A 

J PC-Key Draw (542-545) Pow^erlul destgn pfogram. Works with keyboard or mouse (4 oltri) HO GOA 

J VGA Paint (548) A super duoer pami program ■ only for you f jcky peoole wth VGA V&f^ 5i 2K 

J Banner Sign Makers (55€) Pnni your own panners and ssgns or> your Epson compatible pr-nter 

a On Side (591) - Pfsnis spreadsreets iO' anyir.^rg) SidewayS- 

-t PrlntMaster Graphics (593,594) - A a'ge cc: ec: sn at ci p art tor Primlutaster useis \t diii-l 

J Pfi ntShop Graphics (596.597) A greal coi tH-io-; 'c'- craprjcs Ipr PrmtShop ^2 &*>! ) 

J CompuShow (507) A 'antastfc graphics v^ev^ng utiity for GIF, PCX MacPamt, RLE, and more 

J Cars (480} ■ Several GIF dream cars- inciud'fig a Porsche and Corvette 1-;<IA or VCiA 

J Wildlifft (491) Seauliti.1 v^ildfife p.ctufes in GIF *ofmat VGA 

_i Planes (493) - Several 0'Ct;jres of planes (mostly wa'p-anesl m GIF iorma:. £GA cr VOA 

J VGA Collection I (495-499} A grea! ca' ectio-^ 0* GIF pciyres for VGA systems only ;^ otiiti ;- VGA 

J VGA Collection II (475-479) Vce oea.;T f ji p ctjres fo' ^hose of yOsJ wr:h VGA systems. !S.:£sJ^5; VGA 

J VGA Collection Itl (500-504) - Aro'her [^o^ie^c^cn sf excelSeni GIFs ''or your erjoy mem fi ff^sc^yvGA 



U Brolhtr's Ke«{)«r (702,703) - Document your family's htslory with this genealogy prograr^ s? t^f^^fi^ 
y C.A-R.S. (70S) - This program makes it easy to keep a record Ol ali your auto expenses 
U PRK - Personal Record Keej^r {7ZJ) - A system that tracks a variety ol your persona! rfo MA r-D 
U Honr* Legal Guide (725.726) - A 2 disk sei of leg^ fofrs p!us f j I Text of soTe mportant statutes. MO 

J Cash Control (72S) Vanage your checking, savings, or charge acco-jnts tf^elast ano easy way. Z'K''^ 

"J Home Inventory (738) - Keeps a ^'ecoi'd of aii your personal possessions 

■J Will Kit (771) - Save attorney's lees t^y creating your own will, valid in all SO stales 



GAMES 



J Pyramid Solitaire (920) - Two mce soiiia^e games: Pyramtd So Tai'e and Accordton Solitaire 

J Moratt's Entrsp (§21) Tnis log-c-based 3D game cofrb res a ca enging pjijie wth great graphics 

J Rock n Roli Trivial Matters (922) A grea: tnvia game lor rock ,n rali ojffs 

J Cipher (927) . Try to decioher the^e famous quotatior^s, 

J The Monuments of Mars! (928) Enpiore 20 unique levels fsHed with puzzles, iraps. and creatyres- r,GA 

J Ptg (929} ■ Th s gurple ganne fS guaranleed ^o dnve you r^uls. but yo-j win be determ'ned to beat it. 

J Double Blocks (931) A 'jn and addctri^ game Ejased on the arcade tav or te, Tetns 

J Power Chess (936) A- 0L.'.5T3rH;>rg cness program wsth great graphcs C C ■' 

J Islands of Danger (940) Destroy mss e taunchers wh le negotatmg dtferent lypes c' lerram . -" 

J Tommy's Trivia (941) - A great inv^a g:\rr±> in^at will provide you with n&jrs of enpyment 

J Miramar Right Simulator (950) See f yoj are Top Gun mate;ial as you i|y a luHy armed F-tB' :,.:.'■ 

J Tycoon (979) - Do you have what il takes IQ become a bill ion a rre oil tycoon? 

J Vegas Johnny's Oraw Poker (960} - The most realistic poker garie imaginable 

J Cunning Fool bat! (990} - Vol ca 'he p^ys a^d control the key players Great l jn' 



EGA GAMES 



U Hugo's House of Horrors (951} ■ Help Hu0:O rescue Penelope rn ih^s an mated ad veniute. ;K.^f>^. HD 
U Hugo !l, Whodunit? (9S2) - Hugo and Penelope get swept up ^n another 30 aaveoture' IKiK rH> 
J SuperFly (962} An arcade game with mjitip^e rounds of play This clever game is fots ol funt E^ 
J Klondike Keno (963) - Two gambling games with esceiient graphcs- A .mojse fS recor^mended 
J Solilile (954) - A syitaire game I'ke Mah Jonggwith wester m^eo ptcrures and new stating layouts 
J H*ah Jongg (968) A spita^i-e game played w th Chinese tiles Includes a &t making utilttjr EGA 
J Commander Keen (972) Tne latest and grea lest shareware game, which you are sure to enjOy 
J Captain Comic (984) Thnil to the commercial quality graphics o' this FANTASTIC game f; -A 
J Blackjack) (985) Leam the Skills you need (olsealthetiouseatt'ie 'own gnm,; E, rcf^Hfrr gr;,p",rs 
J EGA Coloring Book (989) - Kids really lo/e to use tnis coloring pograT' ; 
_> EGA Got! (995) A game o* spiffs £tra"egy and reflex Great graphics and realism :a' - 






VGA GAMES 



U VGA Sharks |983) - An uncenwater action arcade game. Avoid the sharks as you collect treasures, VGA I 
LI Bansnold (968) The VGA graph cs are c^jtstandmg tn this grea! Arkenoid-Ike game V lA 

J Catch 'Em (991 ) Catch the falling pieces witn yojr paddfe Many levels: grea! graohics' ^,,; c *. ' j 
J Beyond Tetrls (993} A great Tet^s l.-^e ^a-re wn^ti a rw st : ". 

J Shooting Gallery (994) - Pjt youf aimng s^^liS to the ultimate ;est- Increcibiy good* "'..--; ' "'"^.j^- 
_i VGA Jigsaw (998} - Uses beautiful pictures lo create puzzles lor you to put Pack together. VG-^-. 



PRICES 

Disks Ordered Price Per Disk 

1-9 $1.99 

10-19 1.75 

20-49 1 .49 

50-99 1 .25 

100+ .99 

II you need 3 1.2" disks add SI each. 

Count each Cisk in multiple disk sets. 



Direct Link 
Software 

P.O. Box 2302 
Muncie, IN 47307 

1-800-999-6883 



CGA*iReq^it ^5 Cgtsr Ceifepdtr HChReqijIres Hard Drive 5U'K"Fiu;itiiTr? 5 Vdh RAM 



Name^ 

Street Address _ 
Crty 



_ Phone ( )_ 



State 



.Zip. 



Disks Ordered 

Add $1.00 for each disk if you need 3 1,^2 " disks .„„ _ s$ 

Sales Tax {Indiana residents Add 5%) = $ 

Shipping & Handling (all orders) -$ 4.00 

Foreign Shipping (Canada add $2, Other Foreign $4) . . .= $ 

Method ol payment: 

_f Check J Mor>ey Order J Visa/MC (all orders must be prepaid) 

Card Number: - ^ - 

Exp. 



/ 



_ Signature, 



1-80O99&6883 



I Dir ect Link Software * RO. Box 2302 * Muncie, IN 47307 

Circle Roader Service Number 199 



C0M7I 




#lflME OFFICE 



WORKPLACE 



DANIEL JANAL 



DO your clients know what you do 
and how long it takes? If they 
don't, they might think that 
you're ripping them off. And 
that's a message you certainly don*l 
want to send. 

It's important for any business, at 
home or downtown, to keep accurate 
track of the time spent on projects. 
For me, that means looking at my 
watch at the beginning and end of 
each project and recording the time in 
my diary. However, when I forget to 
make entries (and this does happen), I 
must rely on estimates. Then, at the 
end of each month, I face another 
problem — adding the figures. If 
youVe ever tried to add one hour and 
25 minutes to three hours and 50 min- 
utes, you know what I mean. Do that 
20 times a month, and you'll be mired 
in a tedious process that can be 
fraught with errors. 

Timesiips. a leading time-billing 
program, bolsters its attractiveness by 
claiming that 25 percent of the aver- 
age person's time is not billed proper- 
ly. I recently decided to take the 
program up on its challenge, figuring 
that if 1 won, my income would in- 
crease and my clients would get more 
detailed reports. 

Timesiips is easy to set up. The 
program asks for standard logistical 
data, such as your name, billing rate, 
and activity (consulting, writing, 
phone calls) and your clients' names, 
addresses, and billing rates, among 
other items. This information is used 
to create time sHps, invoices, and la- 
bels. Ten easy minutes later, I was 
ready to track lime. My only com- 
plaint is that I wanted to use my cur- 
rent client number codes, which range 
from 30 to 60. Timesiips insists that 
all client codes be entered sequential- 
ly, beginning with 1 . My solution was 
to enter x in the first 29 fields. 

I began by creating a time slip for 
writing this article and then starling 
the stopwatch. The program displayed 
the time not only as seconds, but as 
dollars and cents. The effect of seeing 
money accumulate on the screen is 
mesmerizing. Time really is money. 



Then, to my dismay, 1 realized the 
first ten minutes of preparation time 
were not billed. But, because the 
Timesiips program lets you enter time 
from the keyboard, I was able to 
quickly remedy this problem. This 
feature comes in handy for services 
performed outside the office. 

To create a time slip, type your 
name or employee number, client 
name or number, and activity. The 
Timesiips program automatically in- 
serts the correct billing rates. You can 
type a description of the activity 
you're about to perform, such as yxriie 
article, proofread mamiscripi. or send 



Tl 


ffl 


E 


n 


1 


E 


n 


t 


E 


SONMYSDE 



invoice. Then select the billing op- 
tions, such as Bill by Client or Charge 
a Flat Rate. Activate the stopwatch, 
and time is credited to your account. 
Timesiips can operate as a TSR, 
which is great for client-based compa- 
nies. For example, say you're working 
on a project for one client when a sec- 
ond client calls. With the TSR func- 
tion, you can stop the time slip on the 
first client and create a new slip for 
the second client in just a few seconds. 
I used Timesiips with WordPerfect in 
a 640K environment with no prob- 
lems, but that didn't leave room for 
any other TSRs. I also used it as a 
stand-alone program in order to free 



some memory and was pleased with 
its performance. 

But while the billing process is 
simple and effective, I found the re- 
porting process cumbersome. Fortu- 
nately, Timesiips gives you so many 
selections that you can create virtually 
any kind of report or invoice you 
need. The program uses onscreen 
prompts and help, but I still needed to 
refer to the manual quite often. Obvi- 
ously, as with any other software pro- 
gram or hardware system, you should 
spend some time with the manual to 
get yourself acquainted with the prod- 
uct. That way, you'll have some idea 
ofwhat to expect. 

I called the technical support de- 
partment (on my dime, as the compa- 
ny doesn't have toll-free support) and 
held the phone for eight minutes and 
23 seconds, according to my Time- 
slips time slip, which displayed my 
lost productivity and earnings on the 
screen, second by second, dollar by 
dollar. (Those who live by the time 
slip die by the time slip.) On the plus 
side, the technician was friendly and 
answered my question with ease. 

Another feature that I liked, and 
which saved me money, was the pro- 
gram's ability to track expenses. I 
sometimes forget to charge clients for 
postage and copying. Because this fea- 
ture is so easy to use, there is no ex- 
cuse for letting nickels and dimes fall 
through the cracks. 

By keeping accurate track of your 
time, a time-tracking and billing pro- 
gram like Timesiips enables you to 
better serve your clients by allowing 
you to prepare detailed invoices that 
are both informative and accurate. 
For workers in an extended office set- 
ting — those telecommuters who are 
becoming an ever-increasing part of 
the modern American work force — 
Timesiips can offer the means to track 
work so that they can meet their em- 
ployers' desire for accurate record- 
keeping. 

Put time on your side. And take 
back all those hours that have been 
slipping through your fingers. You'll 
be surprised by how they add up. Q 



78 



COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



1 






■<^«mir^-,z:L,^,Mt^,^m^»a^f^^^ii>^<-^.- :--,^.^. 



K 



PC Productivity Manager 



\ 



\ "St 



Work at your peak potential! 
Break free of cumbersome MS*»DOS 
restrictions and limitations! 

Single keypresses or mouse clicks do 
it all for you witit COIVIPUTE's super 
new PC Productivity Manager. 

Packed with 38 PC batch-file extensions 
and power utilities, this easy-to-use disk 
includes individual help menus for every 
program. You don't have to be a computer 
maven — just press Ft for IHelp anytimel 

The power utilities alone are worth 
many times the cost of this disk. Imag- 
ine! Programs to speed up your keyboard, 
edit disk files, edit and search memory, 
find a specific text string in disk files — plus 
memory-resident programs such as a pop- 
up calculator, a programmer's reference 
tool, an editable macro key program, and 
a graphic screen-capture utility, and more 
all included on this jam-packed disk. 



Our batch-file extensions add new com- 
mands to standard batch-file language. 
Now you can easily create menus, draw 
boxes, and write strings in your choice 
of colors anywhere on the screen — all 
with simple, easy-to-use commands. 
Then, add some zest to your batch files 
with a command that lets you play a se- 
ries of notesi 

Plus handy system tools let you delete 
an entire subdirectory with one command, 
find out if the system has enough memory 
for an application before it runs, cause the 
computer to remember the current direc- 
tory so that you can come back to it later, 
and much, much, more. 

QMfER YQUF 
fjrPRQDUCm TY 
/MAHmER TOD lY! 




I DYES! Please send me _ VA inch disk{5) ($14.95 each) _ 3H inch disk(s) ($15.95 each). 



. Subtotal 

. Sales Tax (Residents of NC and NY please add appropriate 

sales tax for your area.CanadJan orders, add 7% goods and 

services tax. ) 
. Shipping and Handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 surface 

mail. $5.00 airmail per disk.) 
, Total Enclosed 



Credit Card No. , 
Signature 



fRaqiiired) 



Daytime Tetephone No. , 
Name 



Address. 



_ Check or Money Order _ MasterCard _ VISA 
(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders with subtotal over S20.) 



City 

State/ 
Province. 



ZIP/ 
. PostaJ Code _ 



Send your order to (X)MPUTE'$ PC Productivity Manager, 
324 W. Wendover Ave., Suite 200. Greensboro, NC 27408. 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



TECH 
K]\01fLEDGE 



In business, time is money. For 
most business people who de- 
pend on computers for their 
Uvelihood, few things are more 
maddening than waiting on hold for a 
computer-company technician. Few 
things, that is, except having the tech- 
nician come on the Hne talking in 
some weird computer lingo and offer- 
ing "assistance" that is impossible to 
comprehend. 

Gelling technical support for 
your home office doesn't have to 
boost your blood pressure. Although 
few hardware or software warranties 
guarantee much beyond the right to 
return or repair a product if it turns 
out to be defective, computer compa- 
nies value your business and are 
usually willing to talk you through 
your problem over the phone. The 
store where you made your purchase, 
on the other hand, rarely offers more 
than a limited refund or exchange. 
Keeping this in mind, here are 
ten time-tested ways to help you get 
the technical information you re- 
quire — and turn a potentially frustrat- 
ing experience into a fruitful one. 
When you learn the language com- 
puter technicians talk, you'll get more 
out of your calls to technical support. 
And once you master the basics of 
troubleshooting your own computer 
problems, you'll rarely need to ask for 
technical support again. And that's 
the biggest time saver of all 

IAn Ounce of Prevention 
When you buy a program or a 
piece of equipment, you enter a 
relationship with the manufacturer. 




TEN WAYS 

TO GET 

THE TECHNICAL 

INFORMATION 

YOU WANT . 



AND NEED 




3 



ROSALIND RESNICK 

AND 

SUSIE ARCHER 



Start your relationship off right by 
sending in the registration and war- 
ranty cards enclosed with your pur- 
chase. Telephone support is offered by 
almost every manufacturer, but the 
staffer fielding the call may ask you to 
identify yourself before directing your 
call to a technician. If you're not in 
the company's database as a registered 
user (or if you don't have your regis- 
tration number readily available), you 
may get the cold shoulder. You'll also 
miss out on any notices, newsletters, 
or other product information de- 
signed to keep you abreast of changes. 
You should also consider buying 
a one-year maintenance contract on 
your computer hardware — but only if 
it costs less than ten percent of the 
product's purchase price and you feel 
reasonably certain that the company 
will survive the life of the contract. 
On-site contracts normally don't cost 
much more than a standard contract; 
some companies throw them in free 
as part of a package deal. An on-site 
contract will let you stay at home by 
your phone during business hours 
while a technician comes to you. It 
can save taking a morning off to lug 
your machine to the computer store. 

2 Read the Directions 
No matter how user-friendly 
your computer claims to be 
and no matter how many pull-down 
menus your software possesses, it's 
still a good idea to read your user 
manual carefully before throwing in 
the towel and calling the company for 
help. If you have time or patience for 
nothing else, make sure that you study 






80 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




L Y 19 9 1 COMPUTE 



the chapter that tells you how to set 
up your computer and install your 
software. Make sure that you have fol- 
lowed directions to the letter and that 
you are using the equipment specified. 

If a problem pops up. check the 
troubleshooting guide in the back of 
the manual for common problems 
and frequently asked questions (you 
may want to look in a local bookstore 
for the books listed in the tech books 
section). Remember that few technical 
support lines are toll-free, and, for 
most home computer users* Silicon 
Valley is a long-distance call. 

^^ Reach Out and Ask 
-^ Someone 

W^ Unless you're a seasoned com- 
puter user, there's probably a limit to 
what you can do on your own. There 
comes a time when it's best to pick up 
the phone and call for help. Demand 
assistance right away if your computer 
won't start or your program freezes up 
on the screen and you have to reboot 
or exit your application unexpectedly. 

Call, too, if you find yourself hav- 
ing to repeat a particular task or key- 
stroke sequence again and again. It 
could be that a new device driver has 
been introduced that better supports 
your printer or modem or a software 
guru has come up with a keystroke- 
saving macro that will save you time 
and aggravation. Or your software 
may have been updated to correct a 
problem while the package you 
bought was sitting on the shelf. 

A technician can let you know 
whether you have the latest version. 
Even if there isn't a fix for your prob- 
lem, phone calls are what spur compa- 
nies to make improvements. 

4 Be a Do- It- Yourself er 
Ultimately, the best source of 
product support is you, the 
home user. If your manual provides 
more confusion than help, log on to 
an online database or bulletin board 
and look for answers there. Microsoft, 
Tandy, IBM, and other hardware and 
software manufacturers provide no- 
cost bulletin boards, called ^rwmj: on 
CompuServe and roundtables on GE- 
nie, where the company's technical 
staffers are assigned to read users' 
questions and leave detailed answers. 

It's a good idea to browse through 
these forums before sending in your 
question; chances are your problem is 
not unique. Another nice thing about 
forums is that you can leave and re- 
ceive messages at any time of day or 
night. Remember that though there is 
no extra charge for many of these fo- 
rums, use of CompuServe itself is nei- 
ther free nor inexpensive. 

It also pays to know your limits. 
Whenever a problem occurs, it's wise 

82 COMPUTE JULY 1991 



to back up your data on a floppy disk 
using the DOS BACKUP command. 
Often a support technician can repair 
or restore a damaged file if you 
haven^t tried to fix it yourself first. 
This backup file can also help the 
technician diagnose an obscure error. 
The smartest thing, of course, is to 
back up your system on a regular ba- 
sis. Thai way, your programs and data 
can be salvaged in case of a hard disk 
crash — the home computer user's 
darkest nightmare, 

5 Know the Lingo 
Reaching out for help won't do 
you much good if you don't 
speak the same language as the techni- 
cian on the other end. We're not sug- 
gesting you dash out and take a crash 
course in C. but knowing a little bit 
about the hardware can make your in- 
teraction with a technician much 
smoother. 

Familiarize yourself with the fol- 
lowing, and you'll be on your way: 

• Memory-resident programs (also 
known as terminate and stay resident 
or TSR programs), the most popular 
being Sidekick and PC-Tools' 
PCSHELL, reside in your comput- 
er s random access memor>, en- 
abling your system to call up or 
enhance other applications. Some 
may even load automatically every 
time you turn on your machine. 



Tech Books 

Here is a selection of favorite PC books 
packed with maintenance and trouble- 
shooting information. 

The Hardware Bible 

Winn Rosch 

ISBN 0-13-160979-3 

500 pages 

$29.95 

Brady Books 

Maintaining, Upgrading, and Trouble- 
shooting IBM PCs, CompatiblBS, and 
PSI2 Personal Computers 

Mark Minasi 
ISBN 0-87455-230-3 
384 pages 
$18.95 
COMPUTE Books 

The PC Configuration Handbook, 
Second Edition 

John Woram 

ISBN 0-553-34947-3 

672 pages 

$26.95 

Bantam Books 

Upgrading and Repairing PCs 

Scott Mueller 
ISBN 0-88022-395-2 
750 pages 
$29.95 
Que Books 



They make it possible for you to call 
up a program with a keypress or 
speed up your system in some way, 
but they may also be memory hogs 
and sometimes prevent other pro- 
grams from running. If you have 
problems, a technician may suggest 
that you remove all TSRs from your 
AUTOEXEC.BAT and reboot. 

• If your screen freezes up, you may 
have to warm boot your computer 
by holding down the Ctrl-Alt-Del 
keys or cold boot it by pressing reset 
or turning your computer off and 
and then on again. 

• The CHKDSK command tells the 
technician how much disk and free 
memory space you have available. 

• You'll also need to know the contents 
of your AUTOEXEC.BAT and CON- 
FIG.SYS files. To view these files, 
type CD \ to enter the root directo- 
r>'; then enter TYPE AUTOEXEC 
.BAT You can repeat these steps for 
the CONFIG.SYS file. If either file 
scrolls off the screen before you can 
read it, use Ctrl-S to pause and Ctrl- 
Q to resume the scrolling. You can 
also send a screenful of information 
to vour printer by pressing the 
PRINTSCREEN key. The CON- 
FIG.SYS file sometimes contains a 
command to load a memory manag- 
er. Often these managers have names 
like QEMM^SYS or EMM.SYS. 
These memory managers give access 
to RAM beyond the conventional 
640 K. Technical support people will 
need to know whether you have one 
of these memory managers running 
because they sometimes are the 
source of conflicts that prevent pro- 
grams from operating properly. You 
might tr>' deleting these commands 
or putting REM ahead of them and 
rebooting. If your memory manager 
is the problem, that could clear it up. 

• The setup is a part of memory that 
contains important information on 
what peripherals are attached to your 
computer, PCs and XTs have this 
information coded by setting switch- 
es on the motherboard, but ATs and 
more advanced machines store this 
information in a CMOS RAM that is 
maintained by battery power. If your 
AT fails to boot properly, it could be 
because the CMOS battery has run 
down. Therefore, you should always 
know what is contained in your set- 
up. Different machines use different 
methods to reach the setup, but the 
two most common ways are by 
pressing Ctrl-Alt-Esc or by pressing 
Del while the machine is booting, 
Don*t change the settings except un- 
der the supervision of a technician, 
but you should take the time to write 
down all of the setup information 
and keep the record close to your 
computer. Then if your setup fails, 



you can reenter the information and 
be back to work in minutes. 
• A technician may ask you to identify 
your DOS version, your BIOS type, 
and your graphics display. You can 
easily determine your DOS version 
simply by typing VER at the DOS 
prompt. The BIOS (Basic Input/Out- 
put System) type and display type 
(usually Hercules, CGA, EGA, or 
VGA) flash on your screen when you 
boot your computer. Some common 
BIOSs are AMI (American Mega- 
trends) and Phoenix. 

6 Work the System 
It's easier and faster to get help 
if you know what it's like for 
the technicians on the other end. On 
any given day, the peak volume peri- 
od for help-desk calls is from 9:00 
a.m. to 2:00 p.m. EST (most software 
companies are on the West Coast and 
there is a three-hour time difference 
between the Eastern and Pacific time 
zones). 

Many companies hold support 
staff meetings on Monday morning in 
order to compare notes on problems. 
Generally, you can get faster, more 
personal service if you avoid peak pe- 
riods and call when the support staff is 
most likely to be available. 

It's also important to know who 
will be answering your call At a small 
company, the person on the other end 
of the line may be a programmer or 
software developer, while at a large or- 
ganization, it may be a receptionist 
who will take the basic information 
and route your call to someone else. 
At a midsize company, you are likely 
to land a generalist with good people 
skills who has enough expertise to ask 
the key questions and diagnose your 
problem. A specialist may be called 
in, but it's usually the call-taker's job 
to get the answers you need. 

Generally, computer technicians 
will record their discussion with you 
on a trouble ticket or problem report 
and assign it a level of priority. Priori- 
ty Level 1. for example, will usually 
get you an answer in a couple of 
hours. Priority Level 2 will generate a 
response within a day. Be honest 
about your urgency. You don't want to 
earn a reputation for crying wolf 

7 Put It in Writing 
It's a good idea to keep a de- 
tailed call-history journal in 
case you can't resolve your problem in 
one phone call and must explain your 
problem again to someone else. Your 
log should include the date and lime 
of your call, the problem symptoms, 
the phone number and extension you 
called, the person who took the call, 
and the diagnosis and any trouble- 
shooting steps required. 



« Clean Out Your 
AUTOEXEC 
A support technician will fre- 
quently fix your problem by giving 

you instructions on how to alter your 
system files or copy certain types of 
files or device drivers into certain sub- 
directories. That's why it's important 
to know how to access the AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file that automatically loads 
programs into your computer's mem- 
ory at boot-up every time you turn on 
your machine. If too many memory- 
resident programs are being loaded in 
automatically, you may not have 
room to run other programs that re- 
quire at least 5 1 2K of RAM. A sup- 
port technician can help you edit your 
AUTOEXEC.BAT file using a text 
editor or the EDLIN program that ed- 
its ASCII files. Normally, RAM space 
can be freed up by inserting the letters 
REM in front of any command that 
loads in a driver or TSR. 

^V ReCONFIGure Your 
MM SYStem 

%^ Common problems such as 
system freeze-ups and insufficient 
memory can often be solved by letting 
the technician edit your CON- 
FIG.SYS file. This file usually con- 
tains the statements BUFFERS ^ X 
and FILES = X. The CONHG.SYS 
file also lets you add device drivers to 
your system that can control a mo- 
dem, a mouse, or an optical scanner. 

The more buffers you tell DOS to 
use, the more data it can store in 
memory. The greater the number of 
files you set, the more tasks your sys- 
tem can perform simultaneously. To 
solve your immediate problems and 
help your computer run more effi- 
ciently, set the buffers statement 



somewhere between 10 and 25 and 
the files statement at no less than 20. 

"■ ^^ Take It to the Top 

I I H Captain Kangaroo not- 
-H- M^ withstanding, the three 
magic words are not please, thank you, 
and you're welcome, but please, thank 
you, and may I speak to your supervi- 
sor. If you can't get the help you need 
from the support technician, ask to 
speak with someone further up the 
chain of command. This person, typi- 
cally called the support manager, will 
probably be able to steer you to a tech- 
nician who can better help resolve 
your problem. 

If a problem recurs, try to re- 
member whether you've installed any 
additional hardware or software since 
your last call or if you've recently en- 
tered a large amount of data on your 
hard disk. Even if the answer is yes, 
don't be shy about calling back for 
more help. Don't assume that youMl 
get the same technician on the line. 
This is where your call-history journal 
can come in handy. In addition, prob- 
lems labeled by a technician as chron- 
ic normally get higher priority. 

If you're still not satisfied, it may 
be time to write a letter to the compa- 
ny's president or ask for a refund. 
After all, time is money, and you've 
got to know where to draw the line. 

Tech Support Is Only Human 

Above all, remember that the person 
at the other end of the line is a human 
being who must deal with dozens of 
dissatisfied users at all levels of exper- 
tise. If you are patient and coopera- 
tive — and if you've done your 
homework — he or she can be much 
more helpful to you. EJ 



How to Get Help Onrine 

If you're on GEnie or CompuServe, you're only a phone call away from some of the best 
technical assistance available, directly from your software company. Here are the shortcut 
ways to contact some of the software heavy hitters. Some of the hardware roundtables 
and forums are not directiy supported by the companies involved, but they are a way to 
contact fellow users of the equipment to obtain information. 



Company 


GEnie 


CompuServe 


Microsoft 


MICROSOFT 


GO MSOFT 


Software Publishing 




GOSPC 


Lotus 




GO UDTUS 


WordPerfect 


WP 


GO WPSG 


Ashton-Tate 


ASHTONTATE 


GO ASHFORUM 


WordStar International 




GO WORDSTAR 


Symantec 




GO SYMANTEC 


Borland 


BORLAND 


GO BORLAND 


Hayes 


HAYES 


GO HAYES 


IBM 


IBMPC 


GO IBMNFT 


Macintosh 


MAC 


GO MAUG 


Amiga 


AMIGA 


GO AMIGA 


Commodore 


COMMODORE 


GOCBMNET 



To see a complete listing of the software or hardware forums on CompuServe, type GO 
SOFTWARE or GO HARDWARE. A larger computer-related area containing all of the 
above fomms and more can be reached by typing GO COMPUTERS. 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 



83 



# DISCOVERY 



PATHWAYS 



STEVEN 



A N Z O V I N 



Hal 9000 could do it. So could the 
Terminator, not to mention the 
Robot in Lost in Space, These 
Hollywood computers could 
read, use a phone book, and even read 
lips. In the real world, we also want 
our computers to understand what we 
write and say and to return enlighten- 
ing responses. Unfortunately, they 
don't understand a word. 

That's what computing newcom- 
er Daniel Lombardo, curator of the 
Emily Dickinson Collection in the po- 
et's hometown, Amherst, found out 
when he tried the popular grammar- 
checking program GrammatiklV 
(Reference Software International, 
330 Town send Street, Suite 123, San 
Francisco, California 94107; 800-872- 
9933, 415-541-0222). Danny was writ- 
ing an article about Dickinson on his 
new PC, which he ran through Gram- 
mat ik's battery of grammar, style, me- 
chanics, and spelling analyzers. 

Like other grammar and style 
checkers, Gmmmatik offers sugges- 
tions for improving text based on 
rules developed by academic writing 
experts. The program's internal rules 
couldn't cope with Dickinson's writ- 
ing, however. About Dickinson's 
poem on a hummingbird^ 

A Route of Evanescence 
With a revolving Wheel — 
A Resonance of Emerald — 
A Rush of Cochineal — 
And every Blossom on the Bush 
Adjusts its tumbled Head — 
The mail from Tunis, probably. 
An easy Morning's Ride — 

Grammatik said, This may be an in- 
complete sentence. Long sentences can 
be difficult to understand Consider re- 
vising so that no more than one com- 
plete thought is expressed in each 
sentence. 

The use of />i case in a line from 
one of Dickinson's letters, 'T found 
abundance of candy in my stocking, 
which I do not think had the antici- 
pated effect upon my disposition, in 
case it was to sweeten it," prompted 
this response: Hackneyed, Cliche, or 



Trite . . - Avoid cliches, they distract 
the reader and weaken your message. 
Cliches are a symptom of lazy writing. 

As Danny remarked sarcastically, 
"After 30 years, the great critic Thom- 
as Wentworth Higgins was still bewil- 
dered by Emily's writing. Grammatik 
got right to the point in a microsec- 
ond. She was lazy." 

Grammatik is actually one of the 
better programs of its kind on the 
market and can be a real help to ex- 
pository writers — not poets — trying to 
learn their craft. Reference Software 
doesn't claim Grammatik will make a 




computer "understand" your writing 
any more than a paint program can 
critique your artwork. 

Danny's experience points to a 
more general problem in what's called 
natural language processing, the yet- 
to-be-achieved ability of computers to 
understand everyday language. Com- 
puters work by rules, called algo- 
rithms, and many theorists of artificial 
intelligence think the human brain 
works much the same way. In this 
view, the only important difference 
between brains and computers is in 



the brain's greater complexity and 
adaptability. Make computers more 
complex, faster, and belter able to 
learn, and natural language processing 
should follow — you merely need to 
feed in the right language rules. The 
same rules Grammatik now uses to 
analyze a poem are the primitive pre- 
cursors of a system that may someday 
allow computers to read natural hu- 
man language. 

But research shows that reading 
isn't as simple as it appears; it requires 
a knowledge of how the world works, 
not just the rules of language. Some 
experts estimate that an ordinary, 
common-sense understanding of the 
world may actually require a knowl- 
edge base of as many as 10 million in- 
stantly accessible rules of thumb. But 
because language evolves over time 
and varies in usage with each writer 
and speaker, it may not be possible to 
define all the rules. 

To get a sense of the difficulties 
involved in natural language process- 
ing, first remember what it was like to 
learn how to read in grammar school 
Now imagine attempting the same 
complex task having lived your hfe in 
a featureless box with no speaking 
abihty and having the innate language 
capabilities of a gnat. A daunting 
prospect. 

Clever programming can yield 
software that gives the appearance of 
language understanding. MS-DOS 
seems to "know" what you mean 
when you type dir, and that's what 
misleads computing neophytes. Also, 
it doesn't help that movie robots all 
talk fluently, only occasionally stum- 
bling over human colloquialisms. 
However, most researchers in the field 
of natural language processing are just 
beginning to admit that devising a 
real- world program capable of under- 
standing text, including poetry, on a 
human level is probably decades away 
from happening. 

So why can't PC read? Because 
we don't know how we do it our- 
selves, and until we know better, our 
computers will be unable, in Dickin- 
son's words, to "expound the skies." m 



84 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



^s^^" \ WHETHER IT'S 

GOLF, AIR COMBAT, 
OR ADVENTURE 

cannpuTE 

HAS THE 

OFFICIAL GUIDE 




mm^^^ 






-f^^^^^S. 




The Official Guide to 

Jack NIcklaus Computer Golf 

by Mtke Harrison 

Foreword by Jack Nicklaus 

$12.95 224 pages 

Here's the inside story. Learn how pro- 
fessional course designers decide where to 
put bunkers, trees, and greens. Also in- 
cludes tips for all the Jack Nicklaus golf 
games, including Jack Nicklaus' Unlimited 
Golf & Course Design. This is the only au- 
thorized guide to all the Jack Nicklaus 
computer simulations from Accolade. 

The Official Book 
of Ultima 

by Shay Addams 

Introduction by Lord Brrtish 

$14.95 244 pages 

Written with the assistance of Lord British, 
Ultima's creator, this official guide includes 
inside information found nowhere else. 
Packed full of hints, tips, anecdotes, and 
never-before-published clues for all six 
Ultima adventures. 



The Official F<1 5 
Strike Eagle Handbook 

by Richiard Sheffiefd 
Foreword by Sid Meier 
$12.95 



224 pages 



This is the official guide to MicroProse's 

best-selling F-15 simulators. Covers both 
F-15 Strike Eagle and F-15 Strike Eagle IL 
Filled with step-by-step instructions and 
clear diagrams. 



Other of f ictai guides from COMPUTE 

• The Official F^19 Stealth Fighter 
Handboolc 

• The Official Book of King's Quest 

• The Official Book of 
Leisure Suit Larry 



r 
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Yes! 



I want the official guides checked befow. 



D The OfflciaJ Gukle to Jack Niclilaus 

Comi^efGotf (236-2) $12.95 

D The Official Book of Ultima (22fl-1) $1195 

D The Official F^IS Strike Eagle Handbook (231-1) $12.95 

D The Official F-19 Stealth Fighter Handbook (217-6) $1195 
□ The Official Book of King's Quest, 2nd Ed. 

Covers KQI-V (2«-t) $1195 

G The Of ficial Book or Leisure Suit Larry (IM-X] $tZ.95 

Subiotal 

Sales tajt (Residents or HC. N¥, A NJ add appropriate 

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Shipping and HandUrtg: S2 p«r book US; S4 Canada; 

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Mail to Corrmute Books 
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Pennsauken, NJ 03109 



JULY91CI 



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86 COMPUTE JULY 1991 




RISKY 
BUSINESS 



HOWARD MILLMAN 

ROBOTS MIGHT SOON SAVE 
HUMANS FROM HAVING TO 
DEAL WITH SOCIETY'S 
OLDEST AND NEWEST 
CRISES: WARFARE AND 
HAZARDOUS WASTE 

HELP WANTED: Dedi- 
cated employee to clean 
up life-threatening chem- 
ical spills, patrol leaking 
underground radioactive 
waste tanks, and launch 
single-handed assaults on ar- 
mored vehicles in enemy terri- 
tory. Benefits include frequent 
battery recharging, the very 
latest in artificial intelligence, 
neural network and expert sys- 
tem programs, along with the 
infinite gratitude of humans 
spared from filling these roles. 
Scientists call robots that 
do this kind of work smart. In 
this case the word smart has 
far less to do with common 
sense than with computerized 
intelligence used to make 
high-level decisions. Long the 
darling of science fiction writ- 
ers and movie producers, ro- 
bots have traditionally been 
portrayed as intelligent ma- 
chines performing work too 
dangerous or too dull for hu- 
mans. Despite these decades- 
old prophecies, however, 
totally independent robots still 
exist only in fiction and the 
minds of visionaries. > 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 87 



One realist, Dr. Reinhold C 
Mann, director of the Oak Ridge Na- 
tional Laboratory's Intelligent Sys- 
tems Section, believes that continued 
advances toward creating autono- 
mous robots require much more ex- 
ploration of the ways a machine's 
mind is trained: **We have not yet 
solved the learning problem. We still 
need to achieve a more humanlike 
performance from robots." Mann be- 
lieves one way to solve the learning 
problem is to find a way for an older 
generation of robots to teach the 
younger generation. 

In addition to the formidable 
technical obstacles of creating a prac- 
tical machine intelligence, emotional 
issues also impede progress. Many 
people hold to the once widely popu- 
lar Holly^wood concept that robots, in 
league with malevolent computers, 
could destroy the world, enslave hu- 
manity, or produce widespread un- 
employment as machines replace 
humans. Paul Klarer, robotics soft- 
ware engineer for Sandia Laboratory, 
disputes that concept. "We need to get 
the word out that robots are designed 
to help. They will not take away their 
jobs, but they will keep people out of 
the line of fire," says KJarer. 

Since robots are, after all, merely 
expendable machines and will never 
possess a sense of self-preservation, 
they can be used to spare humans 
from performing society's dirtiest, 
most dangerous work. Each of the ro- 
bots shown in the accompanying pho- 
tographs exists for just that reason — 
to keep people out of harm's way. 





▲ Built on an All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) chassfs, Sandia's Fire Ant qualifies as a 
smart assassin. A human operator guides it to its assigned position by remote 
control. Parked and armed, it waits for an enemy vehicle to pass. The on- 
board Motorola 6805 8-bit processor analyzes incoming sensor data to detect 
the target and initiate the fire-control sequence. When locked onto the target, 
the Fire Ant launches its six-inch armor-piercing slug at 6600 feet per second. 




< This is the result of the 
Fire Ant's attack. The Fire 
Ant's copper-jacketed 
slug devastated this M-47 
tank. Because of such 
awesome firepower, 
some researchers resist 
allowing autonomous mili- 
tary robots the freedom to 
initiate a fire sequence. 
Supporters of robot tech- 
nology claim that future 
armed robots incorporat- 
ing built-in safeguards 
will provide strategic sup- 
port for front-line troops 
with total dependability. 
Even under human con- 
trol, robots already have a 
place on the battlefield. 
The U.S. Army requested 
more than 1000 Fire Ants 
for urgent delivery to Sau- 
di Arabia at the start of 
Desert Storm (ironically, 
Sandia declined, saying it 
could not comply with the 
request on short notice).^ 



COMPUTE JULY 1991 



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I . , , — . , , I 



^ Primarify designed for 
military use, TMAPs (Tactical 
Multipurpose Automated Plat- 
forms) may see service as recon- 
naissance vehicles or as smart, 
mobile launchers of laser-guided 
Hellfire missiles. Like the Fire 
Ant, TMAPs remain under human 
guidance and use on-board com- 
puters and sensors for gathering 
and processing target-acquisi- 
tion data. Grumman's version of 
the TMAP relies on Motorola's 
6805 processors to control its 
propulsion system and process 
incoming sensor data. An Intel 
80386 central processing unit 
provides high-level intelligence 
for path-planning and obstacle- 
avoidance sequences. 

At the current development 
rate of machine intelltgence, 
some cautious researchers pre- 
dict that 20 years may pass 
before advanced TMAP hunter/ 
killer robots can operate without 
human supervision. Even the de- 





velopment of fail-safe logic circuits 
may not convince some experts to 
grant armed robots battlefield inde- 
pendence. Why? Because there are 
thorny ethical questions about the 
fact that military robots lack com- 
passion (and might even violate the 
Geneva Convention), not to mention 
the frightening possibility of the ro- 
bot initiating friendly fire. 

^ Even when stripped of their fire- 
power, mobile robots still keep hu- 
mans out of harm's way. Mounted 
on a Honda ATV chassis, Sandia's 
Telemanaged Mobile Security Sta- 
tions (THOMAS) patrols remote, po- 
tentially dangerous sites to detect 
intruders. Sitting atop a telescoping 
ten-foot-tall mast, THOMAS'S on- 
board computer processes realtime 
data it receives from its sensor ar- 
ray. The computer compares the in- 
coming data against known alarm 
conditions, factors in climatic condi- 
tions, and then decides whether to 
radio an alarm back to a moni- 
tored central command post. 
THOMAS uses high-discrimina- 
tion infrared sensors and radar 
to detect intruders. The next 
generation of THOMASes, al- 
ready under development, will op- 
erate autonomously and contain 
neural networks for acquiring and 
evaluating data. ► 



90 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



> In this time-sequenced pho- 
to, a robot built by Oak Ridge 
Laboratory uses a vacuum 
attachment to clean up a sim- 
ulated chemical spill. Employ- 
ing machine vision to locate 
and map the spill, the IHER- 
MIES III (Hostile Environment 
Robotics Machine Intelligence 
Experimental Series) employs 
three paralleled Motorola 
68020 processors, one Intel 
80286, and 16 Hypercube 
nodes for realtime image 
analysis and decision making. 

Operating independently 
of human guidance, HERMIES 
uses a laser ranging camera 
plus multiple sonar sensors to 
navigate through an unknovi/n 
area containing fixed and 
moving objects. Machine in- 
telligence is supplied by a 
LISP-based artificial intelli- 
gence program supporting 
CLIPS, a public domain ex- 
pert-system shell developed 
by NASA which controls high- 
level navigating decisions. 
The next generation HERMIES 
IV robot will incorporate VLSI 
fuzzy logic hardware to over- 
come the inherent rigidity of 
present-day rule-based 
programming. 

HERMIES' ability to oper- 
ate in hazardous areas and 
make independent decisions 
can free its operators from 
dangerous duty. 





4 Seen here at the controls 
is the HERMIES IIB, a small- 
er, earlier version of the in- 
dependent, versatile robot. It 
receives instructions from a 
single Intel 80286 plus an 
NCUBE 16-node Hypercube 
computer (operating at 16 
MIPS). Using its dexterous 
lightweight arms, this HER- 
MIES IIB learned the se- 
quences (including reading 
panel-mounted analog me- 
ters) required to shut down 
equipment that is malfunc- 
tioning and initiate an alarm- 
control sequence. Like its 
big brother, the HERMIES III, 
the IIB can use its on-board 
computational power to op- 
erate autonomously. The hu- 
man overseer, located in a 
control room at a safe dis- 
tance, is continuously ap- 
prised of the HE'S location 
and progress via an RS-232 
wireless modem. > 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 9f 




you know the incredible 
learning a foreign 




Whether for travel, 
business or entertain- 
ment, conversing in a foreign 
language will open up whole new 
worlds to you. And now there s a 
method that makes learning a 
;n language simpler Pain- 
And faster than you ever 
tliought possible. The first 15 
tapes of this package are the 
veiy same tapes used by the 
US, State Department to 
train career diplomats. 
They're tried and proven 
effective. But it s the sec- 
ond 15 tapes utilizing 
the latest European 
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nearly impossible not to like the bucket 
of bolts when rt dons a bow tie and ad- 
mits in a soft voice that parties make it 
nervous. 

Logan Enterprises, a Greensboro, 
North Carolina, entertainment compa- 
ny, designs, builds, and operates nine- 
foot-tall robots for corporate events. 
The robots, which are actually intricate 
machine costumes with a human op- 
erator inside, are a melding of man 
and machine. 

Creating interaction between hu- 
mans and robots is the job of Logan 
inventors David Rawlins, David Hall, 
and Dan Hall. They have discovered 
that people respond positively to ro- 
bots that project familiar human 
characteristics. 

"If people see the humanness in 
the robot, they tend to react better," 
says David Hall. "For example, the ro- 
bot can offer to shake hands, or it can 
give a compliment: That's a lovely 
sweater you're wearing/ " 

Logan's hulking robots consis- 
tently win over children at Disney 
World in Florida, Hall says. "We'll go 
up to a kid wearing a Mickey Mouse 
hat and say 'I know you; you're Mickey 
Mouse.' The robot, which projects 
childlike innocence, easily makes a 
friend." 

Incredibly, children show littie fear 
of the Logan robots. "Eighty percent 
of the children come up and shake 
hands," Hall says. "They want to 
know how it's built and how it moves. 
Every kid has a robot in his worid. Ro- 
bots let people bring in their own 
imagination." 

Logan's inventors have experi- 
mented extensively witii body language, 
voice pitch, color (red eyes appear men- 
acing, while blue ones come off as 
friendly), and accessories (from bow ties 
to sunglasses to jams) to unlock the hu- 
man heart. 

But personalizing the robot can 
go too far. 

"There Is a fine line, knowing the 
limitations of being human for the ro- 
bot." Hall says, "You don't want to get 
too close to being human, as in an- 
droids, because that scares people." 

Most humans would probably fee! 
threatened by an industrial robot that 
can work three shifts without a coffee 
break — bow tie or no bow tie. But ro- 
bots can do more than entertain at 
parties, build cars, patrol secure areas, 
and blast tanks to kingdom come. 
They can also occupy barstools. 



Host International, a division of 
Marriott, is cashing in on two trends — 
the attractive features of robots and 
the most popular program on televi- 
sion, "Cheers." Host operates airport 
concessions across the country. Now 
it's planning to open Cheers bars in 46 
airports. Two have already opened, in 
the Detroit Metro and Minneapolis-St. 
Paul International airports. The bars 
are more than sawdust and brass, 
though. They feature mechanical 
drinking buddies permanently sta- 
tioned at the end of the bar, like their 
human counterparts on "Cheers," 
Norm and Cliffy. Actually because the 
actors who portray Norm and CI if re- 
fused to give permission to use their 
likenesses, the two robots look more 
like Laurel and Hardy The two trade 
wisecracks and banter while cradling 
beers in their hands. 

The robots — known as Hank Gif- 
ford. who sells hardware, and Bob 



Johnson, who sells insurance — cur- 
rently vegetate in the Minneapolis-St. 
Paul location to celebrate its opening. 
New robots are being built to take their 
place in Detroit. 

Advanced Animation, a \fermont 
company in the robot business for 30 
years, created the dipsomaniacal ro- 
bots. A representative of Host Interna- 
tional stated that the public's response 
to the two robots has been "over- 
whelmingly positive." Far from the 
mundane, regular guys they portray. 
Hank and Bob have become celebri- 
ties, written about in newspapers from 
New York to Los Angeles, as well as in 
the Detroit and Minneapolis-St. Paul 
papers. 

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ing public, Bob and Hank never actual- 
ly take a drink from their glasses. Their 
robotic arms don't work. Only their up- 
per bodies and faces are animated, h 

—SHERRY' ROBERTS 




Hank and Bob belly up to the Cheers bar. 



94 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



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# ENTERTAINMENT 



GAMEPLAY 



ORSON 



SCOTT 



CARD 



I ost computer users don't have 
modems. Why? Probably be- 
cause most people haven't had 
t a good reason to get one. Who 
would they send messages to? Why 
not just pick up the phone and call? 

But all that's starting to change. 
More and more people are finding the 
'*good enough" reason to buy a mo- 
dem is an online service like Prodigy^ 
CompuServe, Delphi, or GEnie. 
There's something exhilarating about 
getting on an electronic information 
service and finding yourself in public 
conversation with people whose 
books or columns you've read or 
whose views you find fascinating. 

I've been online (off and on) for 
years. For instance, I uploaded this 
column by modem, and my book En- 
der's Game, published back in 1 984, 
was the first novel I know of that was 
published electro nically/Zr^r (on 
Delphi). 

The rest of my family never even 
tried to log on until recently. Up to 
now, they just looked over my shoul- 
der as I fumbled through Delphi and 
CompuServe. They added comments 
like, **Cool, I guess," or "What in the 
world are you doing?" or "That is so 
confusing." Then they walked away. 

Until Prodigy. I tried it out to 
take part in an electronic conference 
with a Illinois college class, but the 
service was so interesting, I hung 
around awhile. And I like a lot of 
what Fve seen. 

The Prodigy concept is simple. 
Instead of using your own communi- 
cations program and turning your 
computer into a dumb terminal with 
the mainframe a thousand miles 
away, Prodigy is loaded as a program 
in your computer, and most of the 
routine tasks are handled right there 
in your home. Only when you abso- 
lutely need to upload or download 
something from Prodigy do you ac- 
cess the main system. And when you 
do, the Prodigy program handles that 
automatically. 

This means each person signed 
on to Prodigy uses only a fraction of 
the mainframe processing time 



needed to accomplish the same tasks 
on another online service. That lets 
Prodigy charge you a flat rate instead 
of a fee for each minute of connect 
time. Paying by the minute encour- 
ages you to get off as fast as you can, 
but a flat monthly fee encourages you 
to play around with the system, to ex- 
plore its possibilities. (There's a sur- 
charge of 25 cents per message for 
every message you send above 30 in 
any given month.) 

Another Prodigy innovation is its 
humane interface, which is far less in- 
timidating than the mostly blank 
screen you get from Delphi and 




CompuServe. To their credit, some of 
the other services have been making 
progress. CompuServe Information 
Manager (CIM) and GEnie's Aladdin 
automate many online tasks, CIM 
even has mouse support and pull- 
down menus for the IBM version. 
Aladdin is a keyboard-driven pro- 
gram, but it makes managing GEnie 
RoundTables and software libraries a 
breeze. Just set up yom Aladdin pro- 
gram with the areas you visit most, 
and move to your favorite places with 
the touch of a finger. 

But when my 12-year-old saw me 
din king around with Prodigy, he didn't 
just walk away. He sat down, and in a 
few minutes, I had him signed on with 
his own membership (each household 
gels SLY memberships for the same fee). 
He was off and running. 

Prodigy offers games online, but 
they're simpleminded — nothing to 



write home about. You can shop and 
browse through online catalogs, al- 
though my orders arrive much faster 
through telephone shopping than by 
means of Prodigy. On the other hand, 
I don't have to spend an hour on hold, 
and most companies are a pleasure to 
deal with. 

But Prodigy*s main attraction — 
and the best entertainment — comes 
from other users. The conversations 
and messages on the club bulletin 
boards are a great way to strike up 
some friendships. Best of all, from my 
point of view, there are lots and lots of 
kids online. 

So not only did my computer-lit- 
erate son, Geoffrey, take to Prodigy at 
once; so did my ten-year-old daughter, 
Emily. She cheerfully hooks up and 
carries on her own conversations with 
long-distance friends. 

But there are drawbacks. You 
can't upload or download long files, 
and the message-length limitation, 
though lately improved, is still pretty 
severe. I've found, though, that the 
forced brevity of the messages helps 
me. On Prodigy it lakes only a couple 
of minutes to read and answer letters 
from my fiction readers — so I actually 
complete my online correspondence. 
That doesn't happen verv often with 
the U.S. Mail! 

Of course, you can do all this^ — 
and a lot more — with GEnie, Compu- 
Serve, Delphi, or America Online. But 
can you do it as easily as you can on 
Prodigy? And will your less-than- 
expert family members feel as com- 
fortable exploring these other services 
on their own? Not a chance! 

Is Prodigy worth buying the mo- 
dem for? You'll have to answer that 
yourself But when I see my kids typ- 
ing away, corresponding with people 
all around the country on an incredi- 
bly wide range of subjects, I can tell 
you my answer. Prodigy has made my 
kids use the computer for something 
besides homework and games, and it's 
made their world a little larger, too. 
Prodigy claims that 700,000 house- 
holds are signed on to its system, Fm 
glad mine is one of them! B 



96 



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JULY 1991 



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Circle Reader Service Numtser 118 



IHIING THE SKY 



RICHARD SHEFFIELD 




GO BACK TO WHERE AIR COMBAT BEGAN. 
BEFORE RADAR, MISSILES. AND CHAFF. 
WHEN THE AfR WAS AS CLEAR AS THE MISSION 
AND A FLYING MACHINE WAS SILK STRETCHED OVER WOOD. 



100 COMPUTE JULY 1991 





COMPUTE 101 



Sherman, set the Wayback Ma- 
chine for the year 1914. We're 
taking these software executives 
back to the birth of air combat — 
France during World War I. 

Well, that's one explanation for 
the phenomenon of three major game 
publishers coming up with the same 
answer to the question H^hat next? 
Another explanation, of course, is 
that they didn't ask What's next? 3,1 
all but instead asked What's left? 
Planes, ships, tanks, and helicopters 
from World War II on up have been 
pretty well covered. So it seemed like 
a good lime to revisit World War I 
air combat, when the fighting was up 
close and personal. What's even 
more amazing is that three compa- 
nies could start from the same place 
and end up with games as different as 
Blue Max (Three-Sixty), Knights of 
the Sky (MicroProse), and Red Baron 
(Dynamix). 

The first to reach the marketplace 
was BhwMax, This program sports 
one of the slickest introduction se- 
quences I've seen, consisting of digi- 
tized photos and animated sequences. 
It's a pleasure to watch. But as stated 
in the documentation, this is not a 
true simulation — it's really more of a 
simulation/arcade hybrid. It would've 
been nice to put that on the box as 
well. Bhie Max has the features found 
in most simulations, including multi- 
ple outside views, several choices of 
planes to fly, a VCR function, and a 
campaign mode. But the flight charac- 
teristics of the game are so far re- 
moved from reality that Blue Max 
takes on a pure arcade game feel when 
the planes are in the air. 

However, Blue Max offers sever- 
al things not found in either of the 
other two simulations. First is a split- 
screen tw^o-player mode that allows 
two players to dogfight head-to-head 
on the same computer or fly as a team 
in a two-player campaign. While this 
is not as much fun as a modem op- 
tion, letting two people play on the 
same machine is a real plus. Since this 
game is not very hard to learn, you 
should have no trouble finding oppo- 
nents or wingmen. The main problem 
with this mode is that it's very^ awk- 
ward when both players have to use 
separate sides of the keyboard and 
when one gets the joystick and the 
other the mouse; inevitably they're 
unevenly matched. 

The other unique feature found 
in Blue Max is a strategy game mode. 
This combines simulation with board 
game; players take turns moving 
planes on a hex system playing board- 
While this may not have wide appeal 
it will be enjoyable for serious board 
gamers. 

The next to make it into the fray 




Knights of the Sky takes out another enemy ace. 



^^^\^^ ^=^ 


i^i 


^m\ ^^k. 


^j"^^^ ^^i«p ^^t^E^m M /j^l 


HjBHft -: : . ; ' .' ' ' ' :N| 


H5Sc*^^^^^^!!^^SSIh^^^:'^'^''^n9^^^^^^k^^'^ '»^^I 




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Make films of your dogfights with Hed Saroa 



was Knights of the Sky by MicroProse. 

As expected, this one lives up to the 
high standards of a MicroProse simu- 
lation. With 20 planes and a realistic 
flight model. Knights of the Sky is 
much more complete and realistic 
than Blue Max, A well-designed flight 
training mode with multiple difficulty 
levels helps get the new player ofTto 
an easy start. Learning to handle these 
low-tech aircraft and navigating by 
looking out of the cockpit takes a little 
getting used to, but soon enough 
you'll be ready for more of a chal- 
lenge. The Dogfight option will pro- 
vide you with plenty of challenges. 

Choose a famous German ace as 
an opponent, and test your skills in 
close combat. But as much fun as the 



Dogfight option is, this game really 
shines in the World War I campaign 
mode. Of the three World War I sims, 
this game has the best campaign op- 
lion. Your goal is to become the lop 
ace of the war — the Ace of Aces — and 
to do that, you've got to slay busy in 
the air. News reports between mis- 
sions on how the other great aces are 
doing add continuity and purpose to 
your campaign. If another ace has a 
big lead on you, follow the news to 
find out where he is, and go after him! 

Ground-attack missions are as- 
signed, as are the expected air-combat 
missions. Dropping a bomb by hand 
out of the cockpit requires a whole 
new set of skills when you're used to 
the smart weapons of the jet age. 



102 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 





Last year, ORIGIN defined the \^V XvV 

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Another very interesting feature 
is the unexpected side action that can 
occur during missions. On your way 
home from battle, it's not unusual to 
spot a group of German aircraft about 
to pounce on a friendly observation 
balloon. Your gallantry would certain- 
ly be questioned if you didn't step in 
to lend a hand! 

The VGA graphics and sound 
support are strong, and as if that 
weren't enough, they're topped off 
with a head-to-head-play modem op- 
tion that saves you from connection 
headaches. Competing against a real 
live human adds a whole new level of 
enjoyment to the game. 

Knights is not without its share of 
problems, however. Most notable is 
the fact that a single shot can kill you 
or your enemy. Such a clamor was 
raised over this feature that Micro- 
Prose has made an update available. 
The update not only takes care of this 
problem by adding degrees of damage, 
but it also includes some improve- 
ments to the already outstanding cam- 
paign mode. With the upgrade there 
will be even more action around you 
and friendly aircraft that may come to 
your aid. The upgrade is available di- 
rectly from Micro Prose, or it can be 
downloaded from either CompuServe 
or GEnie online services. 

Red Baron, by Dynamix, was the 
last to arrive on the scene, but it was 
well worth the wait. Red Baron makes 
full use of 256-color VGA in both the 
user interface screens and the flying 
action. The interface uses numerous 
digitized photos and a very polished 
point-and-click system for making 
menu choices. 

This game allows the player to fly 
any one of 28 aircraft and to fly for 
either side. The flight characteristics 
of each plane are ver>' accurately por- 
trayed, and each plane even sounds 
different. Strapping into a Fokker 
D. VII late in the war is a big change 
from flying the early Fokker E.III Ein- 
decker and is certainly likely to boost 
your number of kills. 

Since this is up-close combat, the 
level of detail shown is very impor- 
tant. Red Baron certainly leads the 
pack in this category. You should 
have little difficulty in identifying the 
other aircraft in the sky around you. 

As in Knights of the Sky, you can 
choose to dogfight with the famous 
aces of the day. But here you have 
many more options. If British ace 
William Bishop is constantly ripping 
you up, put him in an old Airco 
D.H.2 and see how well he does. Fly- 
ing against these famous aces is a real 
treat, since theyVe programmed to re- 
spond in the Hying style of the real pi- 
lot. The artificial intelligence of the 
enemy pilots is the best I've seen in 





Features CKart 




Feature 


Blue Max 


Knights of the Sky 


Red Baron 


VGA 256 color 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Play both sides 


yes 


no 


yes 


Copy protection 


none 


manual-based 


none 


Number of planes 


8 


20 


28 


VCR recorder 


yes 


no 


yes 


Instant replay 


no 


yes 


no 


Histoncaf missions 


no 


no 


yes 


Campaign mode 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Modem option 


no 


yes 


no 


Ground attacks 


no 


yes 


no 


Balloon busting 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Famous aces 


no 


yes 


yes 


External views 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Medals/promotions 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Rudder controls 


no 


yes 


yes 


Variable-detail level 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Mouse support 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Multiplane squads 


yes 


no 


yes 


Customize aircraft 


no 


no 


yes 


Board-game mode 


yes 


no 


no 


Damage accumulation 


yes 


only in upgrade 


yes 


Start near action 


no 


no 


yes 


Quit without landing 


no 


no 


yes 



any air-combat simulator. The bad 
guys do much more than just fly 
around in circles— they can put some 
real moves on you. 

A campaign mode is also includ- 
ed and is well done. Because of the re- 
petitiveness of some of the missions, 
Red Baron isn't as much fun as 
Knights of the Sky, but at the same 
lime, it's probably more realistic. In 
Knights, you can frequently get eight 
or nine kills in a single mission, 
whereas in Red Baron you feel lucky if 
you gel one or two kills and make it 
back alive. 

Red Baron sets a new standard 
for VCR-lype mission recorders. You 
can record the entire mission and save 
it for playback later. And the playback 
is really slick. You can switch to an in- 
finite variety of internal and external 
views, and a full range of editing fea- 
tures makes it possible to play movie 
director and put together a very enter- 
taining *'film" of your favorite en- 
counters. These can also be shared 
with others. A number of great Red 
Baron movies are available for down- 
loading on many of the online ser\ices. 

Red Baron does have a few short- 
comings. One is the lack of a modem 
option for head-to-head play Another 
is the inability to land anywhere other 
than an aerodrome. Although the in- 
cremental damage feature and the 
ability to be wounded rather than be 
killed outright are great options, it 
would be nice to be able to set the 
plane down in an open field when in 
trouble rather than being forced to 
crash-land somewhere. 

Counting its graphics, attention 



to detail, historical accuracy, sound 
quality, and mission recorder, Red 
Baron comes out on lop in this three- 
way dogfight. But the upgraded ver- 
sion of Knights of the Sky may be the 
better choice for those interested in 
head-to-head modem play. 

RICHARD SHEFBELD 



Blue Max 

THREE-SIXTY 

Distributed by Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San Mateo, CA 94404-2499 

(800) 245-4525 

IBM PC and compatit)les; 51 2K RAM for 
CGA, EGA, Hercules. 640K RAM for 
MCGA, VGA, Tandy 16*color; joystick or 
mouse optional; hard drive recommend- 
ed; supports Ad Lib, Sound Blaster, and 
Tandy sound cards^$49.95 
Also available for Amiga— $49.95 

Knights of the Sky 

MICROPROSE 
ISOLakefrontDr. 
Hunt Valley. MD 21 030 
(800)879-7529 

IBM PC and compatibles; 51 2K RAM; 
CGA. EGA. VGA, Tandy 16-color; hard 
drive and mouse or joystick recommend- 
ed; supports Ad Lib, Sound Blaster, Ro- 
land MT-32, and Tandy sound cards; 
modem option requires Hayes-compati- 
ble modem. 1200 baud or higher— $59.95 

Red Baron 

Ch'NAMIX 

Distributed by Sierra On-Line 

PO. Box 485 
Coarsegold, CA 93614 
(800) 326-6654 

IBM PC and compatibles (10 MHz or fast- 
er recommended). 640K RAM. EGA or 
VGA, high-capacity disk drive; hard drive 
and joystick recommended; supports Ad 
Lib, Sound Blaster, Roland MT-32. and 
LAPC-1 sound cards— $59.95 



104 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




64/128 VIEW 



TOM NETSEL 



In the recent Readership Surv ey, I 
asked you how you use your com- 
puters. Personal home finances, 
games, education, and word pro- 
cessing are the big four computing ac- 
tivities among Gazette readers. 
Programming and using databases 
and other appUcation programs for 
home or office also are popular. 

Some of you went into detail 
about how your 64 or 128 plays an 
important part in your daily activities. 
One reader in Maine had quite a list: 
letters, labels, budget on a spread- 
sheet, stamp inventory, household in- 
ventor)', name-and-address databases, 
family newsletter, games, family tree, 
greeting cards, horoscopes, bio- 
rhythmSj amortization schedules, and 
Christmas name tags with a graphic 
clue as to the contents of the package. 
"With all this and more, who needs 
an Amiga?" he asked. 

A reader from Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, who's employed by a large 
greeting card company uses three 1 28s 
and nine disk drives at home to sup- 
port his work at the office. G£05 han- 
dles about 99 percent of his chores. 

We received surveys from all 
across the country, Mexico, and Cana- 
da, plus a good number from Austral- 
ia and New Zealand. A subscriber in 
Sweden had trouble finding software 
for his 128 until he discovered Ga- 
zette and started buying items by mail 
He uses his computer to keep track of 
the addresses of friends and relatives 
and members of his radio club. He 
says his 128 is also useful for creating 
party and fox-hunting invitations. 

A good many use the 64 for inter- 
esting and unusual applications. One 
Canadian reader uses his to pick lot- 
tery numbers, although he didn't say 
if it helped select winning numbtvs. 
Another reader has two 64s at work 
connected to a magnetic-strip reader 
that controls the electronic locks on 
two doors. These security-conscious 
computers have been on the job 24 
hours a day since 1985. 

If you put your 64 or 1 28 to an 
unusual use, why not tell us about it? 
Describe your application in 500 



words or less and send it to me on 
disk (Commodore ASCII) or printed 
double-spaced, I'll print the more in- 
teresting items in this column or in a 
separate article. Be sure to include 
your name, address, and telephone 
number, preferably one where you can 
be reached during the day. Send them 
to Gazette Editor, COMPUTE Publi- 
cations, 324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro, North Caroli- 
na 27408. 

In the survey, I also asked you 
what you'd like to see in Gazette in 
the way of articles and programs. 
Your suggestions covered everything 
from more beginner material to more 
advanced programming information. 
Some wanted more games, while oth- 
ers asked for anything but games. Re- 
quests covered the software spectrum. 

Games are popular, but many of 
you want more application software. 
You want programs that will make 
your life simpler, tackle some job 
around the home or office, or control 
appliances. There were many requests 
for programs that you could use with 
hobbies, such as amateur radio, pho- 
tography, or baseball cards. 

In June we published CoilCalc, a 
CAD program for designing coils for 
electronic circuits. We liked CoiiCalc 
but felt it would appeal only to ham 
radio operators. I would appreciate 
your comments on this type of pro- 
gram. Should we publish similar niche 
applications or stick to programs with 
more universal appeal? 

GEOS is another area of strong 
interest. Since many of you asked for 
C/£05-related programs and articles, 
I'm seeking qualified writers and pro- 
grammers to supply material. Several 
GEOS columns are already in the 
works and should be ready soon. 

Here's your chance, program- 
mers. Games, GEOS programs, and 
application software for the 64 — and 
especially the 128 — ^are in big de- 
mand. Send your programs, with in- 
structions printed out and saved on 
disk, to Gazette Submissions Review- 
er at the above address. We want to 
purchase and pubUsh your programs. 



CDNnNTS 



64/128 View G-1 

TOM NETSEL 

How do you put your 64/128 
to use around the home or 
office? Write and share your 
interesting and unusual uses 
with other Gazette readers. 



G-2 

'4 

G-6 



News & Notes 

EDITORS 

New products for GEOS, new 

features on Quantum Link 

Spotlight on Adventure G- 

RUSS CECCOLA 
Magical kingdoms and mysti- 
cal creatures await stalwart 
players of adventure games. 

Reviews G-1 2 

REVIEWERS 

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, 
Printed Circuit Board-Si. 
Blackout, and Double Dribble. 

Feedback G-1 6 

EDITORS and READERS 
Converting SpeedScript files 
for Amiga, screen dumps. 
Jiffy DOS, and more. 

Programmer's Page G-1 9 

RANDY THOMPSON 

Machine Language G-20 

JIM BUTTERFIELD 

Beginner BASIC G-22 

LARRY COTTON 

Diversions G-24 

FRED D'IGNAZIO 

TYPE-IN PROGRAMS G-25 

Moons of Jupiter G-25 

Noah's Arc G-27 

M'mer G-30 

Dungeon Trials G-34 

Meteor Math G-37 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE G-1 




NEWS & NOTES 



What's New 
on Q-Link? 

Interactive game players and casino 
fans have something new to check out 
on Quantum-Link, Puzzler is a word 
game for two to four players. Contes- 
tants spin a slot machine and guess 
the letters in a puzzle that appears on 
the tile board. Correct guesses cause 
the corresponding tiles to turn, reveal- 
ing their location. The object of the 
game is to solve the puzzle before 
your opponents do and to earn as 
many points as possible in the 
process. 

Players appear as animated con- 
testants behind podiums. Online and 
offline character editors are available 
for Q-Link members to design and ani- 
mate their own contestants. They can 
also create and submit their own puz- 
zles for inclusion in the game's 
database. 

Puzzler, Puzzle Editor, and Con- 
testant Editor can all be downloaded 
from the Backstage Puzzler support 
area in Just for Fun. Other information 
and instructions can be found there, 
also. 

Q-Link has also added enhance- 
ments to its four popular casino 
games. These new tools give the casi- 
no staff the opportunity to change the 
stakes in S/ac/c/ac/c, Po/fer, Bingo, and 
Slots, In addition, they have two new 
options in Bingo— the new Cover All 
game, where the entire card must be 
covered, or the standard Straight Line 
play- 
In order to make distinctions be- 
tween the kinds of games toeing 
played and the amount of Q-Chips 
needed to register or ante, check the 
color of the background screen or the 
dealer's hand. Various screen colors 
identify the different games and 
amounts. Check with Q-Link for com- 
plete details. 

Quantum-Link (861 9 Westwood 
Center Drive, Vienna, Virginia 22182; 
703-448-8700) is a Commodore 
64/128-specific online service. 



Tee Up! 



Are you an average golfer aware of your imperfections? If so, then check out 
Personal Pro ($39.95) from MicroLeague Sports (2201 Drummond Plaza, New- 
ark, Delaware 19711-5711). 

This interactive instructional golf package, which is due out in October, ana- 
lyzes, diagnoses, and corrects your problem areas. Personal Pro displays ani- 
mated diagrams of problems and solutions, records a file of your personal golf 
history, and prints out problem/solution checklists that you can take v^ you to 
the course or practice tee. 

Unlike ordinary golfing manuals and instructional videos that try to teach you 
how to build a perfect swing^someone else's swing — Personal Pro is designed 
for the average golfer. It reviews the mistakes of each round and offers instant 
advice on how to correct them. Handicapping disks will also be available. 



7^ 




JU-jM 



Humm'mgblrd 

Hummingbird by Robert Woodalf of Rural Hal J, 
North Carolina, is this disk's Picture of the Month, 



Each month Gazette Disk features a collection of the best 64/ 1 28 artwork 
submitted by our readers. We pay $50 for each piece of art we accept for 
^'Gazette Gallery" and an extra $50 for the one selected as Picture of the 
Month. Send original art to Gazette Gallery, COMPUTE Publications, 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



0-2 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



FOR ORDERS AND 



USA & atiADA au 1 ""oUU^A Oo'bilbu 

Order Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9om'7pm/fii 9am-6:30pm/aOSED Siit/Sui,9:30-6(nj 



mMjmm 



WE INVITE CORPORATE & EDUCATIONAL CUSTOMERS 

DISCOUNTS FOR QUANTIH ORDERS 
RUSH, 2ND DAY & NEXT DAY AIR SERVICE AVAILABLEI 



.Sr^u (718)692-0790 

MONTGOJVIERY CRAIUT: MAIL ORDER OEPT. 

P.0.BQK5eBR00KLynf,N¥, 112ao 

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(Beneath Madison Sq. GarUen) AtYC, NY 10D01 

Store Hrs: MOK-WED 9*7/THURS 9*8/f Al 9- VCIOSED SATURDAY/SUN 9i30-7 

FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE OR ORDER STATUS CALl: (718) 692-1 148 

CUSTOMER SERVICE HOURS: MON-THURS Oam-Spm/FRI 9ani-4pm/SUN 10am-4pti1 



^Commodore 




CcCommodore°128!^ D 



C-128D w/Built-in Disk Drive 
Includes 1 FREE Game 
(a $19.95 Value) 



(*> 



CALL 





FREE 

1 loystkk 

to $t9.95 vttfue) 



Includes: 

Quantum Link Software 

One Joystick 



m 



95 



128D DELUXE 
PACKAGE 

Commodore 128D Computer 

with Buiit-in Disk Drive 
RGB Coior Monitor 
80 Column Printer 
FREE Game (a $19.95 Vatue) 

GALL 

WE CAN RECONFIGURE ANY OF OUR COMPUTER 
PACKAGES TO YOUR SPECIFICATIONS. CALL FOR DETAILSI 

PRINTER 
SPECIALS 



128D COMPLETE 
PACKAGE 

Commodore 128-D Computer 

with Built-in Disk Drive 
80 Column Printer 
12" Monitor 
FREE Game (a $19.95 Value) 

GALL 



64C 

TEST PILOT 

PACKAGE 

Commodore 64C 

Computer 
Commodore 1541 

Disk Drive 
Ace Joystick 
Quantum Link 

Software 



ODORE 
64C COMPLETE 
PACKAGE 

Commodore 64C 

Computer 
Commodore 1541 

Disk Drive 
80 Column Printer 
12" Monitor 
Quantum Link 

Software 



COMMODORE 

64C COLOR 

PACKAGE 

Commodore 64C 

Computer 
Commodore 1541 

Disk Drive 
80 Column Printer 
Color Monitor 
Quantum Link 

Software 




STAR 

NX-1000C........ $166.95 

NX-1000C fla]nbow..$t 95.95 

NX-1001 .$155.95 

NX' 1020 Rainbow $195.95 

NX'2420,..„...„.„...„$279.95 
NX-2420 Rainbow $299.95 



PANASONIC 

KXP-1180 ....$159.95 

KXP-1191.......... $234.95 

KXP-1123 $239.95 

KXP-1124..,. .$259.95 

KXP*1624 $369.95 

COMMODORE 

MPS-1270 Inkjet $159.95 



GSX-140 .....^'™1....... .$269.95 

GSX-1 45 (Wde Canriage) S395.95 

2O0GX it69'.95 

COLOR OPTION KITS..... CALL 




IBM 

Compact, 80 Cokjmn Tliefmal 
Prima r 



INCLUDES 
jmOOORE 
mERFACE 






SANYO PR-3000 

Daisy Wheel Letter Oualty 
Print&r 

$4995 



MAGNAVOX 13" COLOR 
RGB/COMPOSITE MONITOR 
(64,640,128, 1280, Amiga 
Compatible) 

COMMODORE 154111 
DISK DRIVE 

COMMODORE 1084 
MONITOR 



'259 

M59 
»279 



MAGNAVOX 13" COLOR 

COMPOSITE MONITOR 
(64, 64C Compatible] 

COMMODORE 1571 
DISK DRIVE 

1750 CLONE 
RAM EXPANSION 



«179 
GALL 
8189 



PERIPHERALS FOR COMMODORE \ 



OTHER ACCESSORIES FOR YOUR COMMODORE COMPUTER AVAIUBLE 



APROTEK 2400 Baud Modem for 64/1 28.. $99.95 

CARTRIDGE EXPANDER for 64/128 $29.95 

COMMODORE 1700 RAM £xpansion....,.$79.95 
COMMODORE 1764 Expansion Module..$99.95 

CARDCO G-WIZ Interface $49.95 

COMMODORE 1660 Modem $14.95 

COMMODORE 1670 Modem $79.95 



64, 64C Power Supply $29.95 

COMMODORE 1351 MoLise $32.95 

INKWELL UGKT PEN $45.95 

SUPER SNAPSHOT 5.O., ,$59.95 

XETEC S. Graphix Jr. Interface ....$29.95 

XETEC S. Graphix Sr. Interface.. $49,95 

Micro 0*128 Power Supply .„.............$59.9S 



XETEC LT. KERNAL20MB KARD.DRIVE FOR 64. 126.. $549 

XETEC LT. KERNAL40MB HARD DRIVE FOR 64, 126 . $699 

EXCELLERATOR PLUS FSOII Power Supply. $19 95 



NO SURCHARGE FOR CREDIT CARD ORDERS 
CUSTOMER TOLL FREE TECHNICAL SUPPORT 

Ctturied cficcK. Bank Cht-ck Moocy Oidws, Apptoved P.O.s. Vim. Ma&iwcaid. Ante.. OpHrrid. Dirw s Dub, Car Ic-Bfandie, 
COD* i. Vine Transfers aeccpiod Picajc call bcfofc subnmting P.O.s. NoTVCc*li1)ed checks must wait 24 vw>ck5 fo« 
cloaonco Prices and avjilabtfitybubjcctlochanycwdhom nonce. Not rcsp«isibto foi (ypogiaphicctrors Return o( 
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ef.ia? . 




NEWS & NOTES 



Color Me Ninja 

Those turHes are backf Merit Software (13635 Gamma Road, Dallas, Texas 
75244) has released Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' World Tour ($14.95). This 
Electronic Crayon Deluxe release contains 30 pictures of those reinforced rep- 
tiles visiting famous world landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty, Mount Rush- 
more» and Stone henge. 

Children can color each picture again and again. They can also print ban- 
ners, as well as posters and calendars, of their favorite turtle scenes. 


How McFly 
Times 

You won't need a DeLorean to take 
Marty McFly and Doc back and forth 
through time in this game. With a little 
help from Konami (900 Deerfield Park- 
way, Buffalo Grove, Illinois 60089), all 
you'll need is Back to the Future II 
($29.96) and your 64. 

Go back to 201 5 to help save 
Marty and Jennifer's kids from them- 
selves, the police, bully Biff and his 
gang of hoodlums, and Griff — Biff's 
evil grandson. You'll have lots of 
"items o' energy," "products o' 
points," and momentum boosters like 
Plutonium, beverage cans, and your 
trusty tennies. 

Featuring authentic re-creations 
of scenes and items from the film, 
Back to the Future II is really five 
games in one with each level — such 
as Jennifer's House of Fate and the 
Chase of a Lifetime— depicting a new 
chapter in the story. 

Levels 1 , 3, and 5 include arcade 
action where you'll need your hover- 
craft to fend off Biff's band of thugs. 
Levels 2 and 4 are logic puzzles that 
test your memory and ability to antici- 
pate events. If you've seen the movie, 
you're one step ahead. 


Bible Study 

SOGWAP Software (1 1 5 Bellmont Road, Decatur, Indiana 46733) is now ship- 
ping Bible Search version 3.1 ($79.95) for the 64 and 128, Bible Search is de- 
signed for general Bible study and in-depth Bible research. Its versatile search 
option can find any word or verse in the Bible in five seconds or less using a 
1541 . No hard disk or additional RAM is required for this fast performance. 

Bible Search comes on seven double-sided disks with both 64 and 128 pro- 
grams. Nearly 4.5 megabytes of Old and New Testament ASCII text has been 
compressed and indexed for use. 

Other features include instant spelling check of the entire word list of more 
than 12,800 words. Search features include pattern matching, plus AND, OR, 
and NOT Boolean operators. Text can be displayed and scrolled in any direction. 
Printer and disk output are available for any verse. Disk output produces stand- 
ard sequential text files for use with word-processing programs, 

Bible Search is available in either the Authorized King James \fersion or the 
New International \fersion. It includes programs for the 64 and 1 28, a user's 
guide, and a disk storage case. 


Trouble with a Capital B 

UBI SOFT and Electronic Arts (1 820 Gateway Drive, San Mateo, California 
94404) have released BA,T, which stands for the Bureau of Astral Trouble- 
shooters. You t>ecome one of the bureau's agents as you try to save the planet 
Selenias only city, Terrapolis, from extinction. 

Wangor, a top scientist and Mergio, a small-time crook, have announced 
their intention to set off bacterial bombs all over the city. This ultimatum leaves 
the government only ten days to evacuate the city and draw up a deed of owner- 
ship in V^angor's name. Selenia contains vital energy matter that makes space 
travel possible. Its up to you to try to foil Vrangor's evil plans. 

In this game, which comes on two double-sided disks, you can visit more 
than 1100 different locations, including discos, gunsmiths, restaurants, arcades, 
and parks. You can also program a computer implanted in your arm to under- 
stand extraterrestrial languages or to warn you when enemy robots approach. 
Create your own character or select one ready to go into action. You can also pi- 
lot the DRAG, a genuine flight simulator, across the planet's desert. 


in orbit 

Edgeworth Software (44 Bower Street, 
Bedford MK40 3RE, England) has an- 
nounced E.S. Realorbit ($7), a gravita- 
tional orbit simulator. Use your 
thruster jets to steer a spacecraft 
through a star's gravitational field. Try 
to achieve circular and elliptical orbits; 
then maneuver through a double star 
system. You can trace orbits and se- 
lect jet power, star mass, distance be- 
tween binary stars, and colors with 
this entertaining and educational 
simulator. 

Edgeworth Software has recently 
left the U.S. and opened shop in Eng- 
land. Simon Edgeworth assures his 
64/128 customers that all his products 
are still available and will remain com- 
patible with U.S. computers. He ac- 
cepts U.S. funds, either check or 
money order, and will ship all orders 
by airmail at no extra charge. 


New Distributor 

The DMBBS bulletin board program for the 64 or 1 28, formerly owned and dis- 
tributed by ARTISoft, Is now owned and distributed by A & C Enterprises, P.O. 
Box 71 , Beachwood, New Jersey 08722-0071 ; (908) 349-91 87 (voice), (908) 341 - 
0945 (BBS). 



0-4 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



TheBeSt Prices & Service 



Lowest Prices Ever on 
Commodore-Ready Printers! ^ 





$199 



95 




NX-1000C Rainbow 

Full color and * 

Commodore ready! 

Works great with geoPaJnt. 

Print in fuf/ color! Near-letter quality ar 36 cps and high- 
speed draft at 1 44 cps features the new paper parking 
function, Conventent front panel controls. Great for 
extra-rmpact graphics and text. This is the Commo- 
dore-ready versjon— no additional interfaces or cables 
are required Sug Retail S379.00 

NX-TOOOC Rafnbow Color Printer, 
Commodore Ready 757S3 fftS'^Sl 

LOWEST PRfCE EVERl S T 99.95 



Printer Accessories 

Bfack Ribbon for NX-TOOOC/fVX-IOOOC 
Rainbow Color Printer 75471 S5.95 

Color Rtbbon for NX-I 000/NX-lOOOC 
Rainbow Color Printer 75485 S9.9S 

Dust Cover for NX-1 OOOC/NX-1 OOOC 
Rainbow Color Printer 77789 $8.95 



NX-1000C 

Ready to plug into 

your Commodore and gof 

Thi^t iS ihe Commodore-ready version of the NX- 
1 000, You can just plug it in and start printing— no 
additional interfaces or cables are required. 

Sug Retail S 299 00 
NX- 1 OOOC Printer 75060 fVji^^aSi 

LOWEST PRICE EVER] fl 6995 



Telecommunications for Your Commodore! 

And Your Amiga, Too 



2400 Baud 
C64/CI28 



$79 



95 




1200 Baud 
C64/C128 



$59 



95 



Quality TENEX 

PowerSupplieS From 

$3495 




Botti the Minimodem-C and C24 are completely Hayes 
compatible fnoi just parttafiy comaatJt5le itke the 1670 cind 
someAva[ex modefs) and 1 670 compatible This means they'll 
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potfijht on 36venture 



RUSSCECCOLA 

MAGICAL KINGDOMS AND MYTHICAL CREATURES 
ARE JUST A FEW OF THE EXCITING PLACES AND.THINGS 
AWAITING STALWART PLAYERS OF ADVENTURE GAMES 










t ^d venture games make up almost 
vy^ a third of the game releases for 
0^W all computers. Arcade/action 
games make up another third, and 
the remaining third is divided between 
sports and simulations. These percent- 
ages apply to 64 software as well Let's 
take a look at the interesting 
adventure-game segment of the indus- 
try and see what's happening. 

Because of their complexity and 
the demands they can make on play- 
ers» adventure games are not for 
everyone. Still, there are some recent 
games that deserve mention. BAT. 
from UBI Soft, Bill <Sl Ted's Excellent 
Adventure from Capstone, and The 
Keys to Maramon from Mindcraft are 
all fun games that cover a broad range 
of subject matter and difficulty levels. 
True adventure fans will want to 
check out several SSI releases and the 
latest from Origin, Ultima VL 

Save the City 

BA. T stands for Bureau of Astral 
Troubleshooters, of which you are a 
member. Your job is to save the city 
Terrapolis on the planet Selenia from 
destruction at the hand of Vrangor, a 
mad scientist, and his crooked side- 
kick, Merigo. This evil duo plans to 
detonate nucturobiogenic bombs 
within ten days unless the city and all 
its assets are turned over to them. 




Vrsit more than 1000 locations in B,AX 
and interact with seven species. 



The game has a futuristic setting 
and an unusual interface that actually 
works well. BA. T. is played with a 
point-and-click interface that uses 
menus and icons. In addition, items 
found in the game can be examined 
by chcking on them. Indeed, only by 
examining everything you see on the 
screen will you be able to play BA. T. 
successfully. The game is huge. The 
game box claims 1 100 rooms, and 
from what Fve seen, this figure could 
be accurate. This variety keeps B.A, T 
interesting for hours. 

The first thing you do in BA.T. is 
create your character. As is not the case 
in a lot of other games, your alter ego 
in BA.T. is extremely well developed. 



It lakes a while to set up your charac- 
ter, but the time spent will surely re- 
sult in a belter representation of 
yourself In addition to all of the 
standard adventure-game options thai 
can be brought up in the menus, you 
also have access to B.O.B., a bidirec- 
tional organic bioputer thai connects 
to your arm. B.O.B. lets you translate 
languages and examine your statistics 
and health. You program B.O.B. with 
a rudimentary language that will in- 
form you of various conditions and 
enable it to perform other functions. 
The graphics in B.A.T. are pretty 
good for the 64. And even after you've 
managed to defeat Vrangor, you can 
still have fun exploring the city. 

Adventure Calls 

Bill& Ted's Excellent Adventure is 
primarily a movie tie-in, but the game 
is still worthwhile because of its ran- 
dom elements and the different skill 
levels allowed. In this game, you con- 
trol the title characters as they attempt 
to collect "historical dudes" from the 
past for a school project. Different 
skill levels determine how many peo- 
ple you must collect. As you gather 
these historical characters, you return 
them to the San Dimas Mall. When 
you've gotten your quota, you take 
them to school 

You control Bill and Ted from a 
three-dimensional side view, using a 
telephone booth and circuits of time 
to travel throughout history. Some of 
the destinations involve completing 
arcade sequences. Others only require 
the use of a correct object to attract 
one of the "historical dudes." The 
quicker you reach your goal, the more 
points you earn. 

ril be honest. The graphics in 
B&T leave a lot to be desired. The 64 
can handle better. Music and other 
sound are almost nonexistent. The 
game does not look appealing, yet 
gameplay is addictive. I found myself 
wanting to play B S.T again at a high- 
er difficulty level to see how quickly I 
could finish the game. Because each 
game oiB & Tis different, it's worth- 
while playing again and again. A typi- 
cal game doesn't take very long. 
B& r is a great diversion, if you don't 
mind graphics that look like they were 
poorly ported from the IBM version. 

Rampaging Monsters 

Mindcraft has a difierent way of 
thinking about adventure games. Its 
games take almost no effort to play 
yet have a lot to make them interest- 
ing. In fact, much about The Keys to 
Maramon is not evident on the sur- 
face. The manual is brief and explains 
only the basics. The rest of the game is 
left for you to discover. You can al- 
most play Keys without reading the 



instructions at all, but it's still wise to 
go through them. 

Keys puts you in the role of an 
adventurer who must save the town of 
Maramon from the monsters that 
rampage every night after dark. The 
game takes place in town and in the 
dungeons beneath. It requires a quick 
hand and well-balanced character to 
confront the monsters. 

The game takes place in pseudo 
realtime. You have 1 2 hours to kill all 
of the monsters each night, or a build- 
ing will be damaged. If they do too 
much damage to the town, the game's 
over. Budgeting your time is impor- 
tant, so don't think too long while the 
clock is ticking. 




Champions ofKrynn cuts unnecessary 
violence from many of its scenarios. 

Keys is a fast-paced game. You 
have potions and herbs to increase 
speed, strength, dexterity, armor, and 
life points. As the nights wear on, 
you1l need these aids to help you clear 
the town. Character interaction in the 
game is limited to conversation, but 
most people you encounter will offer 
valuable information. This moves the 
plot along. 

You move your character around 
from an overhead view of the town 
and dungeons. Movement is quick 
and smooth. The graphics are nice, 
and you can easily identify each object 
and monster. After a couple of nights 
pass, you will know the town well 
enough to put away the map in the 
manual. Keys is not very difficult and 
can be played rather quickly. Explor- 
ing Maramon and discovering new 
things makes Keys enjoyable. 

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 

One company that still supports the 
64 is Strategic Simulations, Incorpo- 
rated, more popularly known as SSI. 
With over ten years in the business 
and a large library of titles, SSI has 
journeyed through time with Commo- 
dore computers. In the past two years, 
SSI has produced a number of fine 
role-playing adventure games for the 
64, most of which have been in its Ad- 
vanced Dungeons & Dragons line of 



G^ COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



GAZETTE 
D\SK L/BRARY 

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All Gazette disks are menu-driven for ease of use — and they feature complete 
documentation. Just load and you're ready to go! 



SpeedScripf $11.95 

COMPUTE Publications' most popular program 
ever. Powerful word processing package inciudes 
SpeedScripf for the 64, SpeedScripf 128, spelling 
checkers for both 64 and 1 28 versions, pius an 
additional dozen support programs, including 
mail-merge and word-count utilities. 

Gazette Index $7.95 

Every article and department from Gazeffe — July 
1983 through December 1989 issues — is indexed: 
features, gomes, reviews, programming, ''Bug- 
Swatter," "Feedback," and the other columns. 
Disk features pull-down menus, help screens, 
superfost searching/sorting capabilities, and 
much more. 

Best Gazette Games $9.95 

Best dozen arcade and strategy gomes ever 
published in Gazeffe all on one disk. All games for 
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Seeker, Omicron. Powerbali, Q-Bird. Trap. Arcade 
Volleyball, Mosaic. Power Poker, and Scorpion 11. 



Gazette's Power Tools $9.95 

Fourteen of the most important utilities for the 
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PrinfScreen. 1526 PrinfScreer), Fasf Assembler, 
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Gozef fe's best 1 3 programs for GEOS and GEOS 
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SpeedScript D 

Gazette Index D 

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The GEOS Collection D 

1 28 Classics O 

Special 6-Disk Offer n 

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Total 



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'* For deiivery outside the US. Of Conodo, odd 31 for surfoce moil or $3 for oirmai!. All orders must be in U.S, funds drawn on a US. bonk. 



games. Using different-colored boxes 
to represent different types of 
AD & D adventures, SSI has a good 
variety of adventures. 

The gold boxes contain large role- 
playing epics. Avoid two early games, 
Pool of Radiance and Curse of the 
Azure Bonds, unless you like an inor- 
dinate amount of combat. Two later 
games, Champions ofKnmn and Se- 
cret of the Silver Blades, eliminate un- 
necessary combat and significantly 
improve the interface. 

The two silver-box products are 
action games, with less role-playing el- 
ements and more arcade elements. 
Both are good, but Dragons of Flame 
is a big improvement over Heroes of 
the Lance. 

War of the Lance in the green box 
is a war game in the fantasy world, so 
don't be deceived. The white-box 
game, Hillsfar, combines arcade and 
role-playing elements in a game with 
low difficulty and high fun factors. 




SSI's War of the Lance is a war game 
set in the world of fantasy. 

Finally, SSFs latest AD & D 
game is Dragon Strike, a dragon flight 
simulator in the Dragonlance gaming 
world. It*s more arcade game than 
anything else; don*t let the word simu- 
lator throw you. If AD & D games 
aren't your bag, try some of the older 
SSI titles, like Phantasie, Wizard's 
Crown, and the Questron series. 

Lord British 

Origin has also been a strong support- 
er of the 64, Almost all of its past 
games have been converted from IBM 
versions or developed on the 64. 

Given the amount of time and re- 
sources required to develop adven- 
tures on the scale of Origin's Ultima 
series, it came as a surprise to me 
when Origin announced Ultima VI 
for the 64 before it released the Amiga 
version. 

The Ultima series is one of the 
most popular adventure game series, 
and much of the credit for that success 
is due to the creativity and imagina- 
tion of chief designer Richard "Lord 
British" Garriott. Each game in the se- 



ries has far surpassed the previous one 
in most areas, including size, plot, in- 
terface, and graphics. Ultima Vlis no 
different in this regard. As far as 64 
adventures go. Ultima VI is at the top. 
This game can take months to ex- 
plore, and all the time you're getting 
your money's worth. That's value. 

Through a Moon Gate 

In Ultima VI, your character must 
stop the spread of gargoyles that have 
slipped through a moon gate into the 
realm of Britannia. Thai's the basic 
plot, but more unfolds as you enter 
the game. Britannia is about as large 
as it was in Ultima K but this time, 
instead of playing the game on two 
scales, you play it entirely from an 
overhead view of the characters and 
their surroundings. 

The graphics are smooth, and it 
feels more natural to move around in 
one scale than it does in previous Ul- 
tima games that only show the indi- 
vidual characters in towns, dungeons, 
and other buildings. The past games 
jump to a map view of the game 
whenever the party travels into the 
wilderness. Because you can't see far 
ahead in Ultima VI, the cloth map 
comes in handy. 

In addition to the overhead view- 
point, the objects and other graphics 
in Ultima VI are very nice. You can*t 
distinguish objects in your inventory 
as well as you can larger objects in 
rooms, but this is no problem since 
you can examine objects effortlessly. 

The interface in Ultima VI is an 
improvement over that in earlier epi- 
sodes. Unlike the IBM version, which 
employs icons for all of the game 
commands, the 64 version requires 
keystrokes for commands. However, 
the number of commands has been re- 
duced by the addition of a Use com- 
mand, which replaces many others. 

To use an object, just hit the U 
key and move the crosshairs to select 
an object from your inventory or one 
next to your character. This is the way 
to open doors, move levers, throw 
switches, and equip your character 
with weapons, armor, and other items 
necessary to survival and success. 

Old Friends Return 

Accompanying you in Ultima F/are 
characters from past games, namely 
Sham i no, lolo, and Dupre. Lord Brit- 
ish starts you on your quest and can 
be consulted at any time for infor- 
mation. Object manipulation is easily 
accomplished from an inventory 
screen that readily identifies which 
object your character is carr>'ing and 
which ones are nearby. It is best to 
distribute supplies to each character 
so no one is weighed down and you 
don't have to keep switching objects. 



When the time comes, it's easy to 
fight in Ultima VL Just choose a com- 
bat option and use the cursor to select 
a monster. Each monster has its own 
representative theme. 

Ultima F/ is a game chock full of 
characters, objects, locations, and 
dungeons. Characters follow a certain 
daily pattern. Some game objects are 
hidden behind paintings, under plants 
or crates. Discovering new things is 
what Ultima VI is all about. 

You may never finish the game 
because of its size and scope, but de- 
signer Garriott doesn't care. (He'll 
give you a synopsis of this game in the 
manual of his next one.) Garriott be- 
lieves it's more important for you to 
enjoy yourself exploring a rich worid 
full of adventure. He's confident that 
there is much that you can do and 
gives you lots of room for discovery 
and pleasure. 




SSI's Curse of the Azure Bonds is a role- 
playing epic filled with combat 

Ultima VI meets Garriott's crite- 
ria, and the game may be the largest 
adventure for the 64. It definitely is 
the most ambitious. Disk swapping is 
kept to a minimum in order to de- 
crease the frustration factor. Sounds 
are appropriately scattered throughout 
the game, and the music is infectious. 
What results is a graphically rich 
world, full of places to go and things 
to see, where you can escape for min- 
utes or hours. Plus, if you act now, 
you can probably still get the Special 
Edition of the game, celebrating the 
tenth anniversary of Ultima. This ver- 
sion is signed by the author and box 
artist. It contains an audio cassette of 
the history of Ultima narrated by Gar- 
riott and a higher-quality gemstone 
than that found in regular versions. 

As you can see, adventure gam- 
ing for the 64 is alive and well. These 
are just a few of the many games out 
there. Ultima VI is my favorite, but 
the others are all fun and can be com- 
pleted in a reasonable amount of time. 
In any case, if you're looking for a 
quest, tr>' an adventure game. They're 
better than they were just a year ago. 
Happy questing! e 



G-10 COMPUTE JULY 1991 



The Gazette 

Productivity 

Manager 

(Formerly PowerPak) ^^ 

Harness the productivity 
power of your 64 or 128! 

Turn your Commodore into 
a powerful workhorse, keep track 
of finances, generate reports 
in a snap, manage your 
money in minutes- 
all with the new 1991 
Gazette Productivity 
Manager! Look at all 
your 64/128 Productivity 
Manager disk contains. 

GemCalc 64 & 128— 
A complete, powerful, user- 
friendly spreadsheet with all 
the features you*d expect 
in an expensive commercial package 
(separate 64 and 128 versions are included). 
Most commands can be performed with a single keypress! 

Memo Card — Unleashes the power of a full-blown 
database without the fuss! Nothing's easier— it's a 
truly simple computerized address file. Just type in 
your data on any one of the index cards. Need to edit? 
Just use the standard Commodore editing keys. 
Finished? Just save the data to floppy What could be 
easier? 

Financial Planner — Answers all of those questions 
concerning interest, investments, and money manage- 
ment that financial analysts charge big bucks for! You 
can plan for your children's education and know 
exactly how much it will cost and how much you need 
to save every month to reach your goal. Or, decide 
whether to buy or lease a new car. Use the compound 
interest and savings function to arrive at accurate 
estimates of how your money will work for you. 
Compute the answer at the click of a key! 

DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS 
POWERFUL WORKHORSE! 




(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders with subtotal over $20). 


[ D YES! Please send me Frodactivity Manager di8k(») 

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Subtotal 
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1 7% goods and services tax.) 

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REVIEWS 



CRIME-FIGHTING TURTLES • PRINTED CIRCUIT CAD 
PIECES FALLING INTO A PIT • BASKETBALL MAN^ 



TEENAGE MUM 
NINJA TURTLES 

Hey, dudes, how would you like to 
battle evil enemies in New 
York's dangerous sewers? Sure 
it's a dirty job, but that doesn't 
mean you won't enjoy playing Ultra's 
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. 




Based on the famous movies, TV 
show, and comic books, this action- 
packed arcade game will give you 
hours of enjoyment. Raphael, Michel- 
angelo, Leonardo, and Donatello are 
ready for your control. As the game 
begins, you must help these four 
pizza-loving turtles rescue their be- 
loved friend, April O'Neil, who was 
abducted by the evil villain Shredder. 
You must rescue April, destroy Shred- 
der, and take his life transformer gun 
to win. 

Along the streets and sewers of 
New York, you guide the turtles to 
where April may be held hostage. You 
control their every move. Many evil 
creatures lurk about, so be prepared to 
fight Mousers, Roller Cars, Foot Clan 
Soldiers, and many more foes are 
waiting to capture your reptilian war- 
riors. Some enemies are easily de- 
stroyed, while others are not. 

Strategy is important. Each of the 
four turtles has unique skills and 
weapons. Thus, one turtle may be bet- 
ter able to handle a particular enemy 



or situation than another. For ex- 
ample, Leonardo would be the best 
choice for battles in the sewers, since 
he's expert at using a Katana Blade. 

Besides the multitude of enemies, 
there are many useful items to be 
found during your quest. These in- 
clude various weapons, rope, a party 
wagon, and best of all . . . awesome 
pizza! 

An information screen can be ac- 
cessed at any time during the game. 
This important screen will help you 
throughout the game, and you should 
check it on a regular basis. Turtle 
information includes those who are 
available and what weapons they are 
using. There's also a map that shows 
your position- Messages from your 
friends give you useful hints on what 
to do next. 

Your turtles must make it 
through six levels of combat without 
being captured. Each level has differ- 
ent phases to complete before you can 
move on to the next level. Looking at 
playability from this standpoint, the 
game can be rather difficult. Joystick 
movements for combat and travel 
throughout the game are, however, 
generally basic and simple. In this re- 
spect, I find the game easy to play. 

After reading the short manual 
that comes with the game, you'll 
quickly be on your way to action and 
adventure. The manual is easy to un- 
derstand and provides you with the 
necessary information. It tells you 
about the game controls, displays 
sample screens, lists the usefiil items 
to be found, and describes each ene- 
my you will combat. 

The sound and graphics are good. 
Most characters and items in the 
game are displayed clearly on the 
screen, and the background music is 
entertaining as well. 

While it does not get high marks 
for plot originality, this arcade game is 
fun to play and provides many hours 
of entertainment. So, dudes, if you're 
up for some radical ninja action, just 



slip Turtles into your 64, grab your 
joystick, and go to town! 



CHRIS STAWASZ 



Commodore 64 or 1 28 — $29.95 

Uftra Software 
900 Deertield Pkwy. 
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089-4510 
(708)215-5100 



PRINnO CIRCUIT 
BOARDM 

^B nee again, I've stumbled across a 
1 1 64 program that takes that won- 
■ I deiful machine into an entirely 
U new area: printed circuit board 
(PCB) design and layout. Although it 
lacks some of the power and options 
of PCB programs used in the work 
world. Printed Circuit Board'64 from 
MicroSentinel Systems does an im- 
pressive job on a 64 or 128. 





II „J :;:v ;-•;■. ,- II 


m 


/-_■•"" 'V'-J* 


J 



This program is designed for the 
electronics hobbyist If you need to 
put together a simple circuit board for 
some home project, it should take no 
longer to enter it into the computer 
than it does to devise it in the first 
place. 

I must make a confession. I make 
a living as an engineer, and Vm famil- 
iar with circuit boards from college 
classes and from fixing arcade games 
and pinball machines for my brother's 



O-ia COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



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r Freeware For Commodore 64/128 
GAMES, GAMES, GAMESI 

n (6102) ADVENTURE ROAD 1 ■ Coniair^ ^ adventure games: Scary, Africa, Adventure & more, 
n (6123) AOVErfTURE HOAD 2 ■ tO te^igraphic adventure games including SLEUTH, 
n (6124) ADVENTURE flOAD 3-8 text'graphic advenlure games including HACKER, 
n (6049) C-12B GAMES 1-40 col- 
umn Galactic. Castle and Damsels. 
80 column Star Trek. 
-I (6054) C-1 28 GAMES 2 -SO col- 
umn Norad, Warganes. not Lunar 
Land- Print Spock&Kirk. 
1 (6088) C-64 GAMES ■ 1 - Action 
games tLke Robbers, Whirly Bird, Blue Thunder &. more. 

n (6089) C&4 GAMES 2 - Lotto, Attad< Force. Star Trek, Joust. Dsrby, Defcon S more, 
n (6097) IN THE MALL 1 - Conjaios 1 4 ar:ade games. Try your skill on these gems, 
n (6099) IN THE MALL 2 - Contains 14 arcade games. Includes Moondog. Skiing, & more, 
1 (6142) IN THE MALL 3-12 more arcade games including BOULDER DASH and KANGA, 
~i (6100) IN THE PITS .' 1 * Contains 7 car games. Includes Dragsier, Dodge Cars & more, 
n (6101) LADY LUCK / 1 - Contains 10 casino games. Roulette, Craps, BJ, Poker & more, 
n (6202) LADV LUCK ,' 2 - 10 gambting games including ONE ARMED BANDIT, and 21. 
n (6203) LADY LUCK / 3 - 17 gambling games indudsng DODGE CITY POKER af>d KENO. 
n (6096) ON THE BOARDS 1 - Contains ' 1 toard games. Inciudes Yaheee. Battteship & more 
~t (6119) ON THE BOABDS 2-12 board and card games including battleship and cJiess 
n (6120) ON THE BOARDS 3-17 more board and card games tnctud-ng CRIBBAGE and BINGO. 
~i (6118) PUB BOARD GAMES - Darts, Bowling, Pool, Checkers, Backgammon, Chess, and more, 
n (6204) THE FINAL FRONTIER , 1 • 10 action filled space games including METEOR SHOWER, 
n (6206) THE FINAL FHOMTIER 3 ■ 18 action tilled space games including CANYON RUNNER. 
-| (6207} THE FINAL FRONTIER 4-18 act^n filled space games including SPACE DEFENDER, 
n (6104) THE SPORTING LIFE - Contains Golf, Miniature Golf, Baseball 64, Boxing and Trap, 
n (6208) THE SPORTIHG LIFE ■ 2 - 19 games reiadng to sports mduding BOWLING and BOXING, 
n (6108) VICTORY SOFTWARE / 1 * The first disk of shareware games by Victory Soltware. 



"1 



To order, please cheek the desired disk and Include $2,99 for eaeh disk ordered. 

Include shipping* and handling of $4 per order, CA residents add 7% sales lax. 

Bti7 5 dUkA and g«l the 0th one freet 

Please send order, payment, name, address and daytime phone # to: 



Sm 



H, 






Wdomare 



We accept Check, MO, 
Mastercard & Visa. 
Sorry— No COD's. 



I 



n,-j!^ Mrii i I :,^'..;ii--[n!i ['SI , 

7657 Winnetka Ave, Ste 328-C, Winnetka CA 91306 I 

I (818) 700-0784 Msg/Fax (800) 233-2451 Orders OnlyJ 

Circl« Reader Service Number 129 



former vending business. For this rea- 
son, I expected to have no problem 
with PCB-64, but I wasn't too sure 
about people who lack those skills. 
What I found is that the program is 
easy for anybody to use, regardless of 
level of experience. PCB-64 is best 
suited for hobbyists and circuit-board 
designers who want to get a head start 
on a project at home without having 
to use the company computer. 

The package contains two main 
parts: the Layout Editor and the .Art- 
work Editor. The former contains the 
tools and options to create your print- 
ed circuit board. The latter lets you 
add text, tweak the pad, trace sizes, 
and optimize the sizes of all compo- 
nents. Both programs are very simple 
to learn. You almost don't have to use 
the concisely written manual With 
each program, you see a portion of the 
circuit board in the viewing screen 
and a list of commands along the right 
side of the screen. Select these com- 
mands with the keyboard and draw 
with the mouse or joystick. 

A circuit board consists of pads 
(terminal points), traces (wires), and 
components (integrated circuit chips, 
resistors, and so on). The purpose of 
PCB layout is to design the board to 
accommodate the most electronic 



components in the smallest space pos- 
sible. You could almost make a game 
out of PCB layout, with the object 
being optimization of space using a 
certain number of components. 

PCB'64 lets you design two-sided 
circuit boards that can be as large as 
8.8 X 6.4 inches. An important feature 
of PCB-64 is that it allows you to scale 
the board to meet the specifications of 
many types and brands of printers. 
With a paint program interface that 
gives you pads and traces to define a 
board, the program is complete. 

The other big feature of PCB-64 
is a list that the program generates 
upon request of all of the labels associ- 
ated with components and their coor- 
dinates on the screen. Although PCB- 
64 is not a program many people 
would use, it's a great little niche 
product. It lives up to its claims and 
will more than meet the specifica- 
tions of someone who needs a low- 
cost circuit-board editor. 

RUSS CECCOLA 



Commodore 64 or 1 28-~$75 

MICROSENTINEL SYSTEMS 

P.O. Box 4135 

San Pedro, CA 90731-4135 

(213)831-2101 



BIOCKOUT 



For a perplexing challenge that ex- 
ercises the brain instead of joystick 
reflexes, try BlockouL 1 highly rec- 
ommend it to those of you who are 
looking for something more than just 
another shoot-'em-up. 




Biock Out will tax your hand-eye 
coordinatfon. (IBM version pictured.) 

This game has a lot to offer— and 
it's not another Tetris clone. By taking 
the Tetris concept and making it 
three-dimensional, Blockout expands 
the old concept and takes it the next 
logical step. 

As in Tetris, the object of the 
game is to drop irregularly shaped 
pieces into a pit. If you manage to fill 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 0-13 




REVIEWS 



a level across the pit, that level van- 
ishes, and you win bonus points. 

Sounds simple, huh? It's not. 
Simplicity disappears as you advance 
and the game picks up speed. Pieces 
that used to float into the pit like 
feathers begin to drop like stones. I 
was quite happy reaching level 5, the 
pinnacle of my Blockout career. 

Blockoui's graphics are relatively 
simple but more than adequate for 
gameplay. The blocks themselves are 
3-D, starting out as rotatable wire- 
frame objects that solidify into col- 
ored layers as they reach the bottom 
of the pit. Your goal is to fill a layer so 
that it can be removed. If the shapes 
pile up and reach the top of the pit, 
you lose. 

Blockout expands on the Tetris 
concept by offering you a selection of 
three sets of blocks. The sets range in 
shape from the simple to the complex. 
Some of the predefined games are de- 
scribed as Flat Fun (flat blocks), 3-D 
Mania (3-D blocks), and Out of Con- 


trol (abnormal blocks). You can create 
a pit of your own dimensions and 
make a custom game. Any of the three 
block sets (Flat, Basic, or Extended) 
can be used in your custom pit. 

Parameters for rotation speed 
and sound can be customized. Prac- 
tice mode lets you play Blockout with- 
out having the pieces fall into the pit, 
thus giving you time to get used to the 
keyboard controls. Demo mode lets 
your computer show you how to play. 
Help is available to display the game's 
controls. 

Blockout keeps track of your 
score. The ten high scores for each 
kind of pit (dimensions and block set) 
are saved to disk. The game's play- 
ability is good, but a little less key- 
board control would've been nice. 
While this isn't a great handicap, 
using a joystick to control the game 
would've made it easier to play. As it 
stands, the joystick is used only for 
the program's menus, and some of the 
menu options are not even available 


to the keyboard user. 

One thing I can say about Block- 
out is that if you don't own it, get it. 
It's a most perplexing puzzle that will 
be a favorite for years to come. So toss 
out those boring shoot-'em-ups and 
head for the computer store. Pick this 
one up — you won't regret it! 

DAVID W.MARTIN 

■1 


■ 
Commodore 64 or 128— $29.95 

CALIFORNIA DREAMS i 

Distributed by Electronic Arts 

1820 Gateway Dr. 

San Mateo, CA 94404 

(415)571-7171 

DOUBLE DRIBBIE 

■ re you a true basketball fan? If 
II your answer is Yes, then check 
II out Kon ami's Double Dribble, 
11 Double Dribble is a five-on-five 
pro-style basketball game for the 64. It 
turns your computer screen into a 



s(M^ TIME 

r ^ AND 

' MONEY 

Yes, save time and money! Subscribe to the Gazette 
Disk and get all the exciting, fun-filled Gazette pro- 
grams for your Commodore 64 or 128— already on 
disk! 

Subscribe today, and month after month you'll 
get all the latest, most challenging, and fascinating 
programs published in the corresponding issue of 
COMPUTE. 

New on the Gazette Disk! In addition to the 
programs that appear in the magazine, youMl also 
get outstanding bonus programs. These programs, 
which are often too large to offer as type-ins, are 
available only on disk— they appear nowhere else. 

As another Gazette Disk extra» check out 



'^Gazette Gallery," where each month we present the 
very best in original 64 and 128 artwork. 

So don't waste another moment. Subscribe to- 
day to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk and get 12 issues 
for only $49.95. You save almost 60% off the single- 
issue price. Clip or photocopy and mail completed 
coupon today. 

Individual issues of the disk are available for 
$9.95 (plus $2.00 shipping and handling) by writing 
to COMPUTE, 324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



YES! 



^ Start my one-year subscription 
to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk right away 
for only $49.95.* 

D Payment enclosed (check or money order) 
D Charge D MasterCard D Visa 



Acct. No. - 
Signature . 
Name 



Exp. Date , 



(Requjretfl 



Address . 



City — 

State/ Zip/ 

Province Postal Code. 

MasI to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk, RO. Box 3250. Hartan, lA 5159^-2430 

* Reskjents of NC and NY, please add appropriate sales tax for your area. Canadian 

orders. ackJ 7% goods and services tax. 



VIDEO BYTE II the only FULL COLOR! 
video digitizer for the C-64, C-128 

Introducing the world's first FULL COLOR! video drgitizer for the Commodore 
C'64. 64-C, C-128 & 128-D computer VIDEO BYTE can give you digitized video 
from you V.C.R.. LASER DISK. B/W or COLOR CAMERA or OFF THE AIR or 
GABLE VIDEO (thanks to a fast! 2,2 sec. scan time). New version ao software 
features full RE-DISPLAY with MULII CAPTURE MODE, MENU SELECT PRINT- 
ING, EXPAMDED COLORIZING FEATURES, SAVE to DISK feature and much more! 
FULL COLORIZING! Is possible, due to a unique SELECT and INSERT color 
process, where you can select one of 15 COLORS and insert that color into 
one of 4 GRAY SCALES. This process will give you over 32,000 different color 
combinations to use tn your video pictures, SAVES as KOALAS! Video Byte 11 
allows you to save all your pictures to disk as FULL COLOR KOALA'S. After 
which (using Koala or suitable program) you can go in and redraw or color 
your V.B. pic's. LOAD and RE-DISPLAYt Video Byte II allows you to load and 
re-display ail Video Byte pictures from inside Video Byte's menu. MENU DRIVEN! 
Video Byte II comes with easy to use menu driven UTILITY DISK with V3.0 
digitizer pmgram. (64 MODE ONLY). COMPACTI Video Byte IFs hardware is com- 
pact! In fact no bigger than your average cartridge! Video Byte comes with it's 
own cable. INTEGRATED! Video Byte II is designed to be used with or without 
EXPLODE! V5.0 color cartridge. Explode! V5.0"s menu will return you to VIDEO 
BYTE H's menu. EXPLODE! V5 is the PERFECT COMPANION! Video Byte II users 
are automatically sent FREE SOFTWARE updates along with new documenta- 
tion, when it becomes available. PRINTI Video Byte II will printout pictures in 
BLACK and WHITE GRAY SCALE to most printers. However when used with 
Explode! VaO your printout's can be done \H FULL COLOR 8 by 11 's SIDEWAYS 
on the RAINBOW NX-1Q0Q, RAINBOW NX-1000C, JX-80, Selkosha 3000 AL 
(OKIDATA 10/20's (print larger 6" by 9") USER SLIDE 
SHOW program w/auto or manual display is standard 
with VIDEO BYTE program. And can be backed up!) 
Why DRAW a car, airplane, person or for that matter 
. . ■ anything when you can BYTE it, . .VIDEO BYTE it 
instead! 




NEW! SUPER CARTRIDGE 



by The 

Soft 
Group 



EXPLODE! V.5 



The MOST POWERFUL, DISK DRIVE and PRINTER CARTRIDGE ever produced for 
the COMMODORE USER. Super USER FRIENDLY with all ttie features most asked for. 
New FEATURES, (a) Faster non-blanking FASTLOAD. (b) MIRROR imaging of all HI-RES 
screens, (c) 4 Way color selection with insert, for all HI-RES screens, (d) Infinite FILE 
COPY for all SEQ. & PRG. files, copy your file only once, then write that file to as many 
disks as you tike great for single file copying by small user groups, (e) FULL COLOR 
PRINTING ol ALL COLOR HI-RES & MUUICOLOR SCREENS to ALL COLOR DOT MATRIX 
PRINTERS (not for INK JET printers). (I) Direct ONE KEY access back to VIDEO BYTE 
software ttiru EXPLODE! VS.O's 2nd MEWU. (g) Supports all popular printer interfaces, (h) 

FREE upgraded utility disk. 

SUPER FASTLOAD and SAVE (50K-9 SEC'S) works wjtb ALL C-64 or C-128's NO MAHER 
WHAT VINTAGE or disk drives EXCEPT the 1581. M.S.D 1 or 2. SUPER FAST FORMAT 
(8 SEC'S). - plus FULL D.O.S WEDGE w/staodard format! SUPER SCREEN CAPTURE. Cap- 
ture and Convert ANY SCREEN to KOALA/DOODLE. SUPER PRINTER FEATURE allows 
ANY DOT MATRIX PRINTER even 1526/802 to print HI-RES SCREENS in FULL COLOR (us- 
ing 16 stiade GRAY SCALE} ANY PRINTER or INTERFACE COMBINATION can be used 
witfi SUPER EXPLODE! V5.0. NEW and IMPROVED CONVERT feature allows anybody to 
coRvert (even TEXT] SCREENS into DOODLE or KOALA TYPE PICTURES w/FULL COLORI 
SUPER FAST SAVE of EXPLODE! SCREENS as KOALA or DOODLE FILES w/COLOR. SU- 
PER FAST LOADING with COLOR RE-DISPLAY of DOODLE or KQAU fifes SUPER FAST 
LOAD or SAVE can be turned OFF or ON v/ittiout AFFEaiNG the REST of SUPER EXPLODES 
FEATURES The rest of Explode! V5.0 is still active. SUPER EASY LOADING and RUNNING 
of ALL PROGRAMS from the DIRECTORY. SUPER BUILT-IN TWO WAY SEQ. or PRG. Ille 
READER using the DIRECTORY. NEVER TYPE a FILE NAME AGAIM when you use SUPER 
EXPLODE'S unique LOAOERS. 

CAPTURE 40 COLUMN C or D-128 SCREENS! (with optional DISABLE SWITCH). 
All ttie above leatures, and much more! 
PLUS A FREE UTILITY DISK w/SUPER EXPLODE! 
MAKE YOUR C-64, 64'C or C-128*. D-128* SUPER FAST and 
EASY to use, THE BEST THING of ALL . IS THE PRICEf'l Still 
only $44.95 or w/disable S49.95, 
'Note UP GRADES for V5-0 are offered to V4.1 owners only. 
$20.00, w/dts add $5, 

"Note V4.1 owners w/disable will be sent V5.0 w/disable for 
only $20.00 



"only 



All units come w-90 day WARRANTY. All orders add S3 tor UPS BLUE LABEL SfH. UPS BLUE available m\y m 48 states FOREIGN ORDERS are US FUNDS -«-$6.35 S/H. ORDER &0TH EXPLODE! V5 & VIDEO 
BYTE II logetrrer and receive FREE!! UPS S/H. —Noie all SALES aie FINAL. 90 DAY WARRANTY covers PARTS & LABOR ONLY All SOFT GROUP UTILITY DISKS COME w/built-m CATALOG of PRODUCTS 



WORKS WiTH RAl. ALSO i^ IN 64 MODE ONLY 

PLUS $3,00 S/H. NO C.O.D.'S. 



^^^^^j V/SA 



TO ORDER CALL 1-708-851 -6667 

FOREIGN ORDERS U.S. FUNDS ONLY $6.35 S/H. 



IL RESIDENTS ADD 6% SALES TAX 
Personal Checks 10 Days to Clear 



THE SOFT GROUP, P.O. BOX 111, MONTGOMERY, IL 60538 



REVIEWS 



Circle Header Service Number 123 



basketball court for fast action. 

This program*s excellent graphics 
and sound effects make you feel like 
you're right there on the court. You 
hear the clock ticking away and the 
referee blowing his whistle. You can 
see your teammates' positions as well 
as the opposing team's players on the 
court as they pass the ball. Cheerlead- 
ers appear at halftime to root for you. 
Best of all, you can see your points 
mounting on the scoreboard each 
lime the ball passes through the hoop. 

Double Dribble is a game for one 
or two players. However, for two play- 
ers, you'll need a second joystick. 
Playing against the computer is quite 
challenging, since the computer can 
match your every move. As the game 
begins, use the joystick to select such 
options as the number of players, the 
amount of time for each of the four 
quarters, and the NBA team that you 
want to represent during the game. 
You also have the option of selecting 
one of three levels of difficulty. If you 
find that you want to change any of 
these settings during a game, you can 
do so with a touch of the f3 key. 

Your joystick controls all aspects 
of the game, and you can move across 
the court in eight directions. By put- 
ting your player in the path of the 



player with the ball and pressing the 
fire button, you can steal the ball from 
your opponent. The joystick also lets 
you pass the ball to another player of 
your choice with the press of the fire 
button. To take a shot, just aim the 
joystick toward the hoop and press 
the fire button. It's that easy. 

There are several types of shots 
that you can take. These include foul 
shots, three-pointers, jump shots, set 
shots, as well as three types of slam 
dunks. A closeup of these slam dunks 
appears in detail as a team scores. 
Double Dribble also follows the same 
rules and regulations as pro-style 
basketball Your blocking or charging 
will give an opposing team member a 
chance at the free throw line. 

Overall, I found this game to be 
quite challenging and entertaining. I 
didn't play like Michael Jordan or 
Larry Bird, but I did manage to score 
a few points. So if you love basketball, 
give Double Dribble a shot! 

CHRIS STAW\SZ 



Commodore 64 or 128— $14.95 

Konami 

900 Deerfield Pkwy. 

Buffaro Grove. IL 60089-4510 

(708)215-5111 



SOFTWARE 
CLOSEOUTS 

For Commodore 64 & 128 



SSI BARGAIKS, rour ChotcB ..„.„.., J1S Bath 

PhantasiB llf, War game Conjjfuction. Quest ron, B-?J. Ouestron li, 
Roaidwar 2000, Pander Strike. Damon's Wlnler, Eternal Daggcf, 
Isl Over Gefmany. Heroes ol itie Lance. 

AVALONHtLL DEALS ,.,.. ....,,..$10 each 

Darkhorn. GuJt Strike, OfeadnauQhts, Macbeth. Under Fire. Wtoden Ships, 
Dr. Ruth, Panfiian Kings, Jupiter M«siofi, Paruer Jagd. TAG, Tsushima. 
Legionnaire, Parsers East, Maicwell Manor. Quest tor Space Beagle. 
Guderan Cofiiputer Slocks & Borids, Super Sunday. Ripper 
INFOCOM BARGAIWS, Deadline, Siarcfoss. Suspended, Zork 2 or 3 .... W each 

ACCOLADE BLOW-Oirrs, Your Choiea .....tlOeaeh 

Spy Vs. Spy, Blue Angels. Grand Prix Circuit, 4th & Inches. Bubble Ghost. 
Shoot'err Up Construction. T.K.Q.. Mmi Putt. Space Station, Jet Boys, 
Fighl Nigu Sert'fi i Volley. Oambusteis. 

SSG BAHCAINS. Your CholM ....Sie.SO aach 

American Cr^l War Volume 1, 2 of a. Fire King, HatIs of Monieiuma, 
Panzer Battles. MacArthur's War, Rommel Battles for North Alrica. 

OTHEH GREAT DEALS 

Super Expander 64 Cartridge .,.,.„, .„ , S5.00 

Partner 12B, by Timeworks (C/12Bchly) $17.50 

Airtjorne Ranger, by Microprose ,.. S12,&0 

Ait, by Bcjc Office - „.... .,_ SS.OO 

Aliens, by Activision «...^«.-.™„.„ 51250 

Aitst, by Valueware , ^ ..,.„..,. SS.OO 

Assembier. by Corr>modore ^,. ..- — ..,„ ,^.>5.00 



Pr.nied Woid -or- The Tool, by Vaiuewire .-«.,^^..„„.-.„ 
ConQo Bongo, by Sega (cartridge) .„ „..„,„ „,^.,- 

DOLble Dragon, by Arcadia . 



..t2.75each 
..S7.M 
..S9.50 



Entertainer -or- Educator, by Valuevvare ., ,..,S3.75 each 

Elflc Ironic Address Book, by Batteries Included S7.50 

GO. by Hayden f4,ODO-year-old Chinese board game) SS,00 

Hiichhiker s Guide -or- Leather Goddesses, by tntocom , S12.50 each 

Home Manager. By Valueware .-.„,„„„ „ ...„ S5.00 

Las! Nenfa II. by Activision ..„ , „ ...S12 50 

Masterpiece, by CRL (Drawing & paintiiio grsfiJMcs ^itsnt) ...„ $1^.50 

Terror, by CRL (4 complete horror advinturBginiei]i ...„ ..,.il2 SO 

Memoren Diskettes. Box of 10 .,...„^..™«„«„„«„^.,.„„„„„ .,...., S2.50 

Monopoly, by Virgin Games ...«.., „„„.,,„„,„.„„. , $14.50 

Murder on the Mississippi ,.„.,.,.,.,..,. ..$9.50 

PractfcalcW. by Practicorp ,$12.50 

Practicalc It, by Practicorp ,.„...., S17 50 

Practifiie. by Practicorp $12.50 

Spile i Malice -or- Stoky, by Cosmi S2-75 each 

HeswnterfrJ, by HssWare (cartridge) $500 

Turtle Toyiarvd Jr. -or- Tn-Math. by HesWare S4.50 each 

Attack of the Mutant Camels, by HesWare {cartridge) S3-50 

Magic Madness, by Artworx .„ %$ 00 

TO ORDER, SEND CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO: 



COMPSULT 



DRAWER 5160, SAN LUIS DSISPO. CA 93403*5160 

inciud* S4 tat %h>sp^ cni,'c« m U S M ^w Umu ii : <;? i-' , CA T3eo J(M 5S uiB tn 

1-800-676-6616 

CREDIT CARD ORDERS DKLY, FLEASSMM m Mlniinum 

Tt rH*Jvt otfl- Dwnpfele citilog o* ort' IJXO dosnwt (torn 1w al con-pulaf tjiKj. 
«nd J3 in cash or stamps to >f* i£>o-rt sldres. Tlw cuatog s fflEE wtBi any orjier 

Ta charfc (at an sltm lipi HiwJ hut. ciH (fl05> 544:6616 ^^ 



Cirde Reader Service Number 161 




DBACK 



QUESTIONS FROM OUR READERS 



Missing Sections 

From looking at the advertisers index 
in the Februar>* 1991 issue of COM- 
PUTE, a reader would get the idea 
that there are both Amiga and Gazette 
sections in each issue, but there aren't. 
Why the discrepancy, and how often 
will a section turn up missing? 

TODD MOORE 
PIEDMONT, MO 

This was explained last year in 
"64/128 View" (October 1990), but 
since there still seems to be some con- 
fusion, we'll repeat it. After General 
Media purchased the four magazines 
we produced at COMPUTE! Publica- 
tions, the four were merged into one 
basic COMPUTE magazine. There 
are different versions, however. 

If you are a Gazette subscriber, we 
send you COMPUTE with the Com- 
modore 64/128 material in the Ga- 
zette section, Amiga Resource 
subscribers get COMPUTE and the 
Amiga section. PC subscribers get 
COMPUTE with the PC section. If 
you subscribe to COMPUTE, you get 
all the sections, but without the Ga- 
zette type-in programs. For those peo- 
ple who may have several different 
computers, including a 64 or 128, we 
offer a muhiversion edition that con- 
tains all the material including the 
type-in programs. 

Until recently the Gazette and 
Amiga sections were also available in 
the newsstand editions. Now they are 
available only by subscription and in 
certain computer stores: Babbage's, 
Software Etc, and Software Boutique: 
From time to time some editions may 
contain additional sections. Since we 
use the same advertisers index for all 
editions, you 7/ see the references to all 
the different editions. On occasion, 
subscribers may receive the wrong ver- 
sion. If this happens, please contact 
our subscription office at (800) 727- 
6937. 

From Speed Scf/pt to Amiga 

I have been using SpeedScript 64 for a 
number of years, and I have written a 
large number of files that Td like to 



keep. I also own an Amiga 1000, and I 
would like to transfer these files to the 
Amiga. Unfortunately, the terminal 
program I have for the 64 doesn^t 
seem to be able to transfer the Speed- 
Script files. What do you recommend? 

MlCtiA^L W. BELL 
ROCKFORD, IL 

The problem of converting Commo- 
dore-specific text files to true ASCII 
(American Standard Code for Infor- 
mation Interchange) is a recurring 
one. The reason for making the con- 
version usually involves transferring 
files from one brand of computer to an- 
other. The 64 and 128 derive their 
character set from a time when ASCII 
wasn 't the de facto standard it is today, 
and the big players took no pride in be- 
ing compatible. Consequently theS- 
bit Commodores confuse upper- and 
lowercase, neglect common characters 
such as the brace and underscore, and 
e\>en assign some odd character codes 
to the characters that they do have. 
The remedy is to run a program that 
converts Commodore character 
codes— commonly called PETSCII 
after the original Commodore PET — 
into true ASCII, 

There are several such programs 
available, and usually they read from 
and write to sequential files. But 
SpeedScript adds a little more com- 
plexity to the situation by using its 
own special codes for for mattings han- 
dling text it self in an atypical fashion, 
and writing program files instead of 
sequential files. SpeedScript does offer 
two ways around this problem. It will 
write PETSCII sequential files if you 
print the file to the disk by pressing 
Shift-Control-P and then D (for disk; 
at the prompt. If you press ControUZ 
and then the A key on the first line of 
your document and then print it to 
disk, the file will be saved as a true 
ASCII file and will be easy to upload . 

Screen Dumps and Errors 

I have a 64 and a Cardco Card B inter- 
face. The Cardco manual has a screen- 
dump program, but it doesn't seem to 
work. Is there a screen dump available 



from any vendor? I need one for my 
BASIC programs. 

Also, I have a Blue Chip (BCD 
5.25) disk drive that gives erroneous 
characters when I add a spreadsheet 
or game scores. I have several spread- 
sheets that will not work. I would ap- 
preciate hearing from other people 
who may have similar problems with 
their Blue Chip drives. 

DENNIS LONG 
MANASSAS, VA 

Cartridges, such as the Soft Group's 
Super Cartridge Explode V.5 and 
LMS's Super Snapshot V5, offer 
screen dumps and many more fea- 
tures. CMD's JiffyDOS also has a 
screen-dump option. Advertisements 
for these products can be found in re- 
cent issues of this magazine. If you 
have back issues o/Gazette, check for 
a type-in program called PrintScreen 
(December 1987). It also offered a cus- 
tomizer program for different printers. 
There was also a program called Hi- 
Res Screen Dump (October 1 984) for 
1525 or compatible printers. 

We have never heard of a disk 
drive's being responsible for erroneous 
characters in spreadsheets or game 
scores. Are you certain you 've entered 
the formulas correctly? If any other 
readers have experienced similar prob- 
lems, we'll be happy to pass their infor- 
mation on to you. 

Nifty Jiffy 

I was pleased to see Art Hunkins's fa- 
vorable review of Creative Micro De- 
sign's JiffyDOS 6.0 in the December 
1990 issue. It's a terrific system, but I 
have to take issue with him on several 
points. 

First, his apparent horror at the 
idea of replacing soldered-in ROM 
chips. What's the big deal? I did it 
twice in old 64s. No sweat. Just use 
common sense and a good soldering 
tool to pull the ROMs, a low-watt iron 
to solder the new sockets, and gentle- 
ness when inserting the new chips. It's 
nothing that an experienced amateur 
or technician couldn't do in ten min- 
utes. That's all it took me, and Vm no 



G-16 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




FEEDBACK 



whiz kid 

Second, save-with-replace routine. That com- 
mand works fine in my machine. All I do is have 
the revised program in memory, hit fl for the direc- 
tory, cursor to the filename, insert three spaces be- 
tween the open quotes and the filename, type @0:, 
hit f6, and then hit Return. It's quite convenient. 

Third, validate and format speeds. They defi- 
nitely are improved on my 154L 

I do have some minor bones to pick with 
CMD. I wish it had retained the function-key RUN 
and LIST commands as in previous versions and 
relegated TLIST and LOAD ML to program-mode 
commands. 

Otherwise, alPs great, and kudos to COM- 
PUTE for the new design, 

RICHARD VAN FRANK 

MONTCLAIR, NJ 

Once you have some experience with a soldering 
iron, removing ROM chips and soldering in new 
ones without damaging anything may not be such a 
difficult task. But it 's not the place for a beginner to 
start. If you have a newer 64 with chips that slide in 
and out of their sockets, installing the JiffyDOS re- 
placements is a snap, CMD recommends you check 
to see which type you have before ordering JiffyDOS. 

Reader-to-Reader Help 

I am desperate and don't know where to turn next. I 
am looking for a 36-pin plug so I can print docu- 
ments in Epson mode for my SR 2000 Dual Inter- 
face printer. I have a 64 and a 1 541 disk drive. Does 
anyone know where I can purchase this plug? 

BOB CHALFANT 
12229SE196THST. 
RENTON,WA 98058-7518 

The information about my modem was recently 
destroyed, so 1 wrote a letter to the company re- 
questing a copy. My letter was returned, since the 
company apparently has gone out of business. Can 
anyone help me find an instruction manual for a 
Westridge Communications modem, model 
MFJ-1237? 

GARY LEE REYNOLDS 
t5D.ANIELST. 
UNIONTOWN. PA 15401 

Blasts from the Past 

I read in one of your magazines that you could or- 
der a back issue of COMPUTE, but I was wonder- 
ing if it's possible to order a full year's worth. 
Also, is it possible to get back issues of the 
disks? 

ERIC SCHNEIDER 

KJLLEEN, TX 



We have back issues of many magazines 
and disks, but supplies vary. If you contact 
Single Copy Sales, COMPUTE Publications, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408, 
(919) 275-9809 and specify which issues you 
want, we'll see what we can do. Back issues 



Big Blue Reader 128/64 

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Big Blue Reader 128/64 is a fast, easy-to-use, menu driven program 
for novice and expert alike. Transfers word processing, text, ASCII, and 
binary files between Commodore 64/128 and IBM PC compatible 360K 
5.25" and 720K 3.5" disks. Includes both C64 & 01 28 programs. 
Requires 1571 or 1581 Disk Drive. Does not work using 154t 
BBR 128 Version 3.1 upgrade, $18+ original BBR disk. 

Big Blue Reader 128/64 only $44.95 



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5) Boolean Search operators including AND, OR & NOT logic. 

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of magazines are $6.00, and disks are $9.95. There are no issues 
for July August, or September 1990, as we did not publish during 
those months. 

Final Help 

This is in reply to David Richards* Final Cartridge III question in 
the February 1991 issue about the Help and Replace commands. 
There is a slight difference in the way the commands act in 64s 
with different ROM versions, but all commands work. Enter 
PRINT PEEK(65408) to see which version you have. I have com- 
puters with versions and 3. 

Help is useful in debugging BASIC. It lists the last executed 
line. Just enter HELP after pressing Stop or after an error occurs. 



3-D GRAPHICS DESIGN 

li Voted Best Graphics Program 
—Run Magazine 198S 

For CommodoTC 64/128 in 64 mode 
View Designs in Multiple Perspectives 



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Professional-Educational^Home Applications 
Architects, Engineers, Designers, 
Programmers, Students 
CAO-3D!! enter me inlo the fastest growing field in 
grjpliic technology. A1 j ipecijl introducfory price 
553,^5. Add S4.00 foV shipping and handling, for 
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Dealers/Distributors inquiries welcomed. 



Circle Reader Service Numbef 184 




FEEDBACK 



It's nice when you can't see an error 
message onscreen. 

Replace is my favorite command. 
It changes BASIC commands, num- 
bers, or anything in quotes, excluding 
commas and quotation marks. For ex- 
ample, if you were to enter REPLACE 
"FOR y\ "FOR K", it would change 
J to K in FOR-NEXT loops. 

BRIAN KISSINGER 

EVANSVILLE, IN 

Software Resource 

Here's a hint for your readers who 
want to find certain software for the 
64, Amiga, Plus/4, VIC 20, or PET. It 
will also help you find the names and 
addresses of companies that produce 
that software. It's a book called Soft- 
ware Informal I on for Commodore 
Computers by Menu. It can be found 
at pubUc libraries. It's up to date and 
extensive. 

JOHN REALING 
SPOKANE. WA 

You're right, John. We me it quite 
■ often. Menu, which is a division of 
Black Box, sold this 400-page directo- 
ry to Commodore, which is now dis- 
tributing it. If you would like to 
purchase a copy write to Commo- 
dore— The Menu, Attention Customer 
Support, 1200 Wilson Drive, West 
Chester, Pennsylvania 19380. The cost 
is $12,95 plus $3.00 for shipping and 
handling. 

Mangled Memory 

I am working on a game program that 
uses redefined characters on the 64. 
The program also uses three-dimen- 
sional arrays. I have a problem with 
the screen elements turning to garbage 
after it runs for a while. A few reverse 
characters can be identified, but that's 
it. Can you help? Is it a problem with 
memory? 

AL FREEMAN 
MfAMI. FL 

It sounds like you are experiencing a 
memory conflict You've put new char- 
acter shapes used in your game into a 
certain block of memory. As the pro- 
gram runs and uses different variables, 
BASIC stores these variables in the 
same memory where the character 
shapes are stored. This causes the indi- 
vidual character shapes to turn to gar- 
bage. Reverse character shapes are in 
the second half of the character set, so 
they are the last ones to be garbled. 



The Video Interface Chip (VIC- 
II) handles all the video-related chores, 
including the display of character 
shapes. This chip can access only I6K 
of memory at a time. The default video 
bank is (from location to 16383), 
which means the screen, custom char- 
acter shapes, and sprites must all re- 
side in thai same 16K block. Since a 
complete character set uses 2048 bytes, 
it 's common to use the 2K at the top 
of the video bank for that purpose. 
This puts the custom characters at 
14338-16383. 

A 64 's BASIC is built into a con- 
tinuous section of memory. The 64 
uses locations 0-1023 for its own pur- 
poses, and screen memory and sprite 
pointers occupy 1024-2047. The first 
byte available for BASIC is 2048. 
Read Only Memory (ROM) starts at 
40960. So under normal circum- 
stances BASIC controls the 38,911 
bytes of the memory^ from 2048 to 
40959. 

What about the custom charac- 
ters that are stored at 14336-16383? 
They are in the middle of the block of 
memory BASIC expects to use as its 
own. This is where the problem arises 
with your custom characters turning to 
garbage when your program runs. 
BASIC expects to use this area for its 
own purposes. As it uses more and 
more variables, memory fills up, and 
before long your character shapes have 
been overwritten by BASIC 

There are a couple of things you 
can do to get around this problem. 
Move the characters to another loca- 
tion, or move BASIC Moving the 
character sets requires moving the vid- 
eo banks, which also means you have 
to move the screen and the HIBASE 
pointer at 648. If you do this, then you 
have to either disable the Restore key^ 
or avoid pressing Run/Stop-Restore. 
Most programmers find it easier to 
move BASIC to another location. To 
transfer the start of BASIC from 2048 
to 16384 (which is just past the end of 
your character set), enter the following 
lines in direct mode before you load 
your program: 

POKE 43,l:POKE 44,64: POKE 
16384,0: NEW 

An ST Magazine? 

First of all, I want to say that I'm not 
precisely happy with your decision to 



integrate Gazette into COMPUTE. Of 
course, I understand your decision, 
since there are fewer 64 owners; that 
means fewer subscribers. But I think 
you're going to lose more subscribers 
with this decision. Time will tell. Any- 
way, ril probably renew my subscrip- 
tion, since I don't know of any good 
Commodore-only magazine other 
than yours. 

The main purpose of this letter is 
not to complain, however. I've just 
bought an Atari 520 ST (111 keep my 
good old 128), and I was wondering if 
you pubHsh any ST-specific maga- 
zines or books. 

JOSE LUrS REGUEIRO 
MONTEVIDEO. URUGUAY 

As 8-bit Commodore users upgrade to 
other systems, the}^ also make changes 
in the computer magazines that the\^ 
buy. It's true that Gazette doesn V have 
as many subscribers as it did when in- 
terest in the 64 was at its peak, but a 
more significant problem is the shrink- 
ing number of advertisers. For most 
publications to remain healthy, they 
must have advertisers as well as sub- 
scribers. Look at a Gazette from a few 
years ago and then look at this issue. 
Compare the number of ads for Com- 
modore-related products. 

By combining Gazette with 
COMPUTE, which now has a PC fo- 
cus (and more advertisers), we can 
somewhat offset the loss in 64 advertis- 
ing revenue and yet still provide Com- 
modore owners with the useful, 
entertaining, and informative material 
that they want. 

From 1986 until 1988, we pub- 
lished COMFUTEVs Atari ST Maga- 
zine with a companion disk It failed 
10 attract sufficient advertisers or a 
large enough base of subscribers to re- 
main profitable. Back issues of the 
magazine and disk are still available. 
The price for each magazine and disk 
combination is $8. Foreign orders 
should add $6 for postage. To order 
back issues of any of our magazines, 
write to our Greensboro, North Caroli- 
na, address printed below. 



If you have a question, comment, or 
problem, we want to hear from you. 
Send vour letters to Gazette Feedback, 
COMPUTE Publications, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408, B 



G-IS COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



RANDY 



THOMPSON 



This month "Programmer's Page" 
presents 128 programming tips — 
that is, programming tips for the 
Commodore 128 (not 128 tips). 
Got it? Good! 

Taking It with You 

Like to move to 64 mode without los- 
ing the current BASIC program? It's 
easy. Simply enter the following 
commands: 

POKE 43,1 
POKE 44,28 

These POKE statements tell the 
64 portion of your computer that the 
current BASIC program may be found 
in memory at 7169 ($1C01), the de- 
fault location in 1 28 mode. 

HENNING VAHLENKAMP 
MATAWAN, NJ 

Timely Program Saves 

This utility programs one of your 
computer's function keys so that it 
saves the current BASIC program to 
disk. To keep successive saves sepa- 
rate, the elapsed time is added to the 
end of the program*s filename. 

When you run this utility, you 
are asked to enter a filename and a 
function-key number. As an example, 
enter MYPROGRAM, 5 (the 5 speci- 
fies the f5 key). Answer Yes at the RE- 
SET CLOCK prompt. Next, load the 
program you want to edit, make your 
changes, and then press f5. If 20 min- 
utes and 32 seconds have elapsed, 
your program will be saved to disk 
using the filename MYPROGRAM 
002032. Now let's say you make addi- 
tional changes which take exactly 5 
minutes. When you press f5, the pro- 
gram is saved with the filename 
MYPROGRAM 002532. 

10 C$=CHRS(34):BL$= " 

20 INPUT '^PROGRAM NAME, 

FUNCTION-KEY 

NUMBER'^;PS,K 
30 P$=LEFT$(P$+BL$,10) 
40 PRINT ^^RESET CLOCK?" 
50 GET K$:IF K$<>**Y" AND 

K$<>"N" GOTO 50 



60 IF K$=*V THEN 

TI$= "000000" 
70 KEY K,"DSAVE"+C$+P$+ 

C$+TI$+CHR${13) 

In addition to providing a way to 
differentiate between multiple ver- 
sions of the same program, this utihty 
also allows you to see how much time 
you spend between programming 
sessions. 

JAMES A. SWIFT 
ORL.ANDO, FL 



HANDY 
PROGRAMMING 



\\l 



128 ONLY 



In Focus 

To increase the readability of the 
128's 80-column screen, try entering 
the following POKEs: 

POKE 54784,9 
POKE 54785,232 

This smooths out the vertical ap- 
pearance of the 128's slightly grainy 
80-column character set. 

JESSE SIEHLER 
CUMBERLAND, MD 

Undocumented Info 

Although it's not mentioned in the 
128 System Guide, you can use 
CTRL-S instead of the Scroll Lock 
key to pause screen scrolling. Press 
any other key to continue scroUing. 
Another undocumented keyboard tip 
is the ESC ESC sequence. Hitting the 
Escape key twice provides an aherna- 
tive to the traditional ESC O sequence 
for canceling quote mode. 



If you have a 128D or 128 with a 
ROM upgrade, enter the following 
instructions. 

BANK15:FOR L=25589 TO 
25611:PRINTCHR$ 
(PEEK(L));:NEXT 

It reveals a secret message. 

HENNING VAHLENKAMP 
MATAWAN, NJ 

Double-Spaced Listings 

With the 128's expanded memory, 
programs can reach enormous 
lengths. Large BASIC listings can be- 
come quite a headache to debug, too. 
The following function-key definition 
can help out. After executing the code 
below, pressing the f 7 key prints a 
double-spaced program listing to the 
screen. 

KEY 7,"OPEN128,3: 

ClVn>128:LIST:ClJOSE128: 
A"+CHR${13) 

Note the A at the end of the func- 
tion-key string. This forces a syntax 
error which resets the computer's text 
output to normal, sin^e-spaced print- 
ing. Without this A, strange side ef- 
fects occur. If you'd like the option to 
list a specific range of program lines, 
use these function-key definitions: 

KEY7/*OPEN128,3: 

CMD128:LIST" 
KEY 8,":CIjOSE128: 

A''-fCHR${13) 

To use these keys, press f 7, enter 
the line-number range you want to list 
(or don't enter anything if you want to 
list the entire program), and then 
press f8. 

ARTHUR MOORE 
ORLANDO, FL 

'Trogrammer*s Page" is interested in 

your programming tips and tricks. 
Send all submissions to Programmer's 
Page. COMPUTE'S Gazette, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408, We'll pay 
$25-$50for each tip we publish, B 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE a-19 




MACHINE LANGUAGE 



J I M 



BUTTERFIELD 



Programming hi-res graphics on 
the Commodore 64 or 128 (in 40 
column mode) has always been a 
mystery to newcomers. The most 
confusing thing about the Commo- 
dore hi-res screen is the fact that it 
isn't laid out the way you might ex- 
pect. The eighth pixel on the top row 
of the screen appears next to the 
ninth, but they are actually eight bytes 
apart. As you might expect, plotting 
points on a screen like this can in- 
volve some pretty complicated math. 

This month's column should 
make it crystal clear. Given X (0-319) 
pixels from the left of the screen, and 

Y (0-199) pixels from the top, the cal- 
culation goes as follows. Divide X and 

Y by 8 (keeping the remainders XR 
and YR). The quotients represent the 
row (0-39) and column (0-24) of the 
character cell in which the pixel is lo- 
cated. Multiply the Y quotient by 40 
and add the X quotient; that gives the 
character cell number. Multiply this 
result by 8 to get the byte number for 
the start of the graphics cell memory; 
add YR to get the actual byte. The re- 
sulting number, from to 7999, deter- 
mines the byte within graphic 
memory. Add the graphics base to get 
the actual address. The XR value will 
tell us which of the eight bits will be 
involved. 

It sounds complex, but it can be 
worked out neatly in machine lan- 
guage. Multiplying and dividing by 8 
is just a matter of three shifts, left or 
right. Dividing by a value such as 8, 
the remainder is even easier The 
AND function will extract it for us. 
Looking more closely, we see that a 
division by 8 is followed by a multi- 
plication by 8; that provides another 
shortcut. 

In fact, multiplying by 40 seems 
to be the hardest part, and that's just 
multiplying by 5 and then by 8. 

Assuming that the graphics base 
is at address $2000, and that the user 
will POKE values of X into addresses 
78 (high byte, $4E) and 79 (low, $4F), 
and POKE Y into address 80 ($50). 

033C A5 Sa LDA $50 



033E 29 07 
0340 85 52 



AND #$07 
STA $52 



Note that the EOR command will 
produce the equivalent of lNT(Y/8)*8 
in a single instruction. We'll do this 
again later for X. 

0342 45 50 EOR $50 

0344 85 FC STA SFC 

0346 A2 00 LDX #$00 

0348 86 FD STX $FD 




We'll multiply by 4 and add the 
original value to get the effect of mul- 
tiplying bv 5. We're arriving at the 
equivalent of INT(Y/8)*40. 

034A 06 FC ASL $FC 

034C 26 FD ROL $FD 

034E 06 FC ASL $FC 

0350 26 FD ROL $FD 

The earlier value is still in A, so 
we may add immediately. Can you 
see why we may be sure that the carry 
flag is clear? 

0352 65 FC ADC $FC 
0354 90 02 BCC $0358 
0356 E6 FD INC $FD 

The calculated value is in the A 
register (low) and address $FD (high). 
Next you want to multiply by 8, so 



continue to use A. A loop is possible, 
but straight code is easy. 

0358 OA ASL 

0359 26 FD ROL $FD 
035B OA ASL 
035C 26 FD ROL $FD 
035E OA ASL 
035F 26 FD ROL $FD 
0361 85 FC STA $FC 

Time to work on X, 

0363 A5 4F LDA $4F 

0365 29 07 AND #$07 

0367 85 51 STA $51 

0369 45 4F EOR $4F 

The three low bits of the A regis- 
ter must be 0. We want to add the val- 
ue in A to the value in SFC and $FD, 
and then add the Y remainder that we 
stored long ago in address $52. These 
values have no bits in common, so we 
can combine them and save a step 
using the ORA instruction. 

036B 05 52 ORA $52 
036D 65 FC ADC $FC 
036F 85 FC STA $FC 

Video base address is assumed as 

$2000. 

0371 A5 4E LDA $4E 

0373 09 20 ORA #$20 

0375 65 FD ADC $FD 

0377 85 FD STA $FD 

0379 60 RTS 

In the above coding, the carry flag has 
been doing exactly the right thing ev- 
ery time. A happy occurence. 

Address FC/FD contains the ad- 
dress of the byte for manipulation. 
You'll need this bit-lookup table. 

037A 80 40 20 10 08 04 02 01 

Finally, this calHng routine will 
calculate the location and set the 
pixel. 

0382 20 3C 03 JSR $033C 
0385 A6 51 LDX $51 



Q-20 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




MACHINE LANGUAGE 



0387 AO 00 LDY #$00 

0389 Bl FC LDA ($FC),Y 
038B ID 80 03 ORA $037 A,X 
038E 91 FC STA ($FC)»Y 

0390 60 RTS 

POKE 78,X-high (0 or 1); POKE 
79,X-low; POKE 80,Y and then SYS 
898 (that's address $382), and the 
pixel will be plotted. Although the 
above might seem like a lot of code, 
it's surprising how much good math 
you can pack into a relatively brief 
machine language program. 

The following BASIC program 
may seem slow, but that's the fault 
of BASIC, not the ML code. Note 
that address 8 1 92 (hex 2000) is with- 
in the activity area of the BASIC lan- 
guage; a larger program using this 
kind of code would need to look 
carefully so that the screen would 
not collide with BASIC. 



100 DATA 165,80,41,7,133,82 
110 DATA 69,80,133,252,162,0 
120 DATA 134,253,6,252,38,253 



130 DATA 6,252,38,253,101,252 

140 DATA 144,2,230,253,10,38 

150 DATA 253,10,38,253,10,38 

160 DATA 253,133,252,165,79,41 

170 DATA 7,133,81,69,79,5,82 

180 DATA 101,252,133,252,165 

190 DATA 78,9,32,101,253,133 

200 DATA 253,96,128,64,32,16,8 

210 DATA 4,2,1,32,60,3,166,81 

220 DATA 160,0,177,252,29,122 

230 DATA 3,145,252,96 

300 FOR J=82e TO 912 

310 READ X:T=T+X 

320 POKE J,X 

330 NEXT J 

340 IF T09391 THEN STOP 

400 REM SWITCH IN HI -RES 

410 POKE 53272,24 

420 POKE 53265,59 

450 REM CLEAR COLOR 

460 FOR J=1024 TO 2047 

4 70 POKE J, 118: NEXT 
480 REM CLEAR CHARACTER 
490 FOR J=8192 TO 16383 
500 POKE J, 0: NEXT 

510 FOR X=30 TO 200 
520 y=20:GOSUB 900 
530 Y=X-10:GOSUB 900 
540 Y=X-9:G0SUB 900 

5 50 NEXT X 

790 FOR J=1024 TO 2047 

800 POKE J, 32; NEXT ^^ 



810 REM SWITCH OUT HI-RES 

820 POKE 53272,20 

830 POKE 53265,27 

840 END 

900 POKE 78,X/256 

910 POKE 79, (X AND 255) 

920 POKE 80,Y:SYS 898 

930 RETURN 



Use the handy 

Reader Service Card 

in the back of the 

magazine to receive 

additional information 

on our advertisers. 



1990 Gazette Index 




Everything's included! 

Features, games, reviews, 
education/home applications, 
programming, bug-swatter, 
feedback, and columns! 

A superb interface includes pull-down menus, help 
screens, and keyboard, joystick, or mouse control. Fea- 
tures include super-fast searching and sorting capa- 
bilities. An options screen allows you to choose text 
colors, drive number, and input device. And there's ftill 
documentation on disk. 

Choose from three modes of operation — browse for quick 
scanning, uiew for detailed information and descriptions, 
and edit for adding items from upcoming issues — and 
print to any printer. There's even a turboload option for 
maximum disk-access speed. 



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. Pt)stil Code - 




BEGINNER BASIC 



LARRY COTTON 



Although we studied this not long 
ago, we'll continue our BASIC 
math with a review of the some- 
what arcane, but nevertheless 
quite useful, trigonometric functions 
sine, cosine, and tangent (or SIN, 
COS, and TAN, as they are used in 
BASIC). Bui first a brief course in 
trigonometry. 

Triangles are the reasons trig ex- 
ists. Without those ubiquitous three- 
sided figures, SIN, COS, and TAN 
probably would never have been in- 
vented. In the good old days, you had 
two methods for finding various sides 
and angles in triangles: trigonometry 
tables in books and a slide rule. 
Thanks to calculators and computers, 
trig functions are now a mere keypress 
away and more accurate than either 
the slide rule or tables. SIN, COS, and 
TAN can handle most iriangulation 
problems you'd want to solve. Yes, 
there are more trig functions, but 
most of them can be derived from 
these basic three functions. 

To use trig to discover unknown 
sides or angles, the triangle must be a 
right triangle — that is, one angle must 
equal 90 degrees. (In this column, tri- 
angle means "right triangle.") 

You must also know at least two 



other things about it: the length of one 
side and the size of one angle, or the 
length of two sides. However, know- 
ing all the angles is not sufficient to 
calculate the sides. Possibly the most 
common triangle is a 45-45-90 (so 
called because of its angles); both its 
short sides are the same length. 

The next most common is a 30- 
60-90. The length of its shortest side is 
always half the length of its longest. 
Notice that the sum of a triangle's an- 
gles is always 180 degrees; if you know 
two angles, just subtract their sum 
from 180 to find the third angle. By 
knowing the lengths of any two sides 
of a triangle, you can find the length of 
the third side by using squares and 
square roots (see last month's col- 
umn). Here's an example: 

10 PRINTiCIRlfDNIIF YOU DONT 

KNOW A SIDE," 
20 PR1NT**JUST PRESS RETUBN." 

:PRINT 
30 INPUP^LONGESTSIDEnSL 
40 INPUP*SHORTEST S1DE";SS 
SO INPUr^ECOND LDNGEST 

SIDE";SM 
60 IFSL=0THENUS=SQR(SSt2+SMt2) 
70 IFSM=0THENUS=SQR(SLT2-SST2) 
80 IFSS-0THENUS=SOR(SLt -SMt2) 



100 PRINT:PRINT"UNKNOWN SIDE 
IS"US 

When running this program, just 
press Return to denote the side you're 
trying to find. For instance, if you 
press Return at the first prompt, the 
value of the longest side will be 0. 
Then, after you enter the values of the 
two other sides, line 60 will execute. It 
detects that SL (the longest side) is 0, 
or unknown, and calculates its value. 

WeVe using the Pythagorean 
theorem, which says that the square of 
the longest side of a triangle is the sum 
of the squares of the other two sides. 
Look at line 60. US (the unknown 
side) is calculated by taking the square 
root of the sum of the squares of the 
other two sides. Remember that math 
inside parentheses is done first. There- 
fore, SS (the shortest side) is squared 
first; then SM (the next longest side) is 
squared before those two numbers are 
added. The square root of that num- 
ber is taken, giving the length of the 
longest side. 

Line 70 or 80 is used if the long- 
est side and one of the shorter sides 
are known. The longest side is 
squared first; then the known short 
side is squared. The latter result is 



eo*" 



SIN 30**=-^ =.5 
10 



10* 



90° 



30° 



KNOWN ANGLE 




Figure 1 



Figure 2 



C-22 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




BEGINNER BASIC 



subtracted from the former, and the 
square root of that result is taken to 
gel the answer. One of the IF-THENs 
will always be true if two legal values 
are entered. Even though three ques- 
tions are always presented, only two 
positive values can be entered. Line 
100 always prints the answer. 

Try entering 5 for the longest side 
and 3 for the shortest. The second 
longest side will be 4. Another whole- 
number triangle is one whose sides are 
5-12-13. In other words, if you just 
press Return at the first prompt and 
then enter 5 and 1 2, the answer will be 
1 3. If you enter 13, skip the next, and 
enter 1 2 for the second longest side, 
the answer is 5.0000001, which should 
be exactly 5. 

The reason for the very slight 
mathematical error is that the com- 
puter converts every decimal number 
you enter to a binary number, does 
the calculations in binary math, and 
then converts the binary answer back 
to decimal form. Some accuracy is 



lost in this conversion process. 

SIN is simply a ratio of the 
lengths of two sides of a triangle. In a 
30-60-90 triangle, if the shortest side is 
5 feel, the longest will be 10 feet. The 
ratio of the two sides is 5:10, which 
can be written 5/10 or .5, The shortest 
side will be opposite the 30-degree an- 
gle. The SIN of 30 degrees is .5. The 
SIN of any angle is the ratio of the 
side opposite the angle to the longest 
side. (See figure 1.) 

To find this value using the com- 
puter, try entering the following in the 
immediate mode. 

PRINT SIN(30) 

Surprisingly, the computer spits out 

-.988031623. What gives? 

The computer calculates trigono- 
metric functions in radians. There are 
pi (about 3. 14) radians in 180 degrees; 
one degree equals about .017 radian. 
Therefore, in order to calculate SIN in 
degrees we must type the following: 



PRINT SIN(30*7t/180) 

This will yield the correct answer, .5. 
The side opposite the known an- 
gle is called, appropriately, the oppo- 
site side. The side next to the known 
angle is called the adjacent side, and 
the long side is the hypotenuse. (See 
figure 2,) As an example, if you know 
one angle and its opposite side, you 
can calculate everything else. 

10 INPUT1CLR1IDN1SH0RT SIDE";SS 
20 INPUT^'IDNIANGLE OPPOSITE 

SHORT SIDE*^;KA 
30SL=SS/SIN(KA*K/180) 
40AN=180-90-KA 
50SM=SQR(SLt[2-SStl2) 
60 PRINTrPRINT'LONG SIDE IS"SL 
70 PRINT:PRINT"NEXT lONGEST SIDE 

IS"SM 
80 PRINT:PRINT"SHORTSIDE IS"SS 
90 PRINT:PRINP^ANGLES ARE 90,"KA", 

AND"AN 

Next month: more trig! 



COMPUTE'S 



SpeedScrlpt Dish 



A powerful word processing 
package for Commodore 64 
and 128 owners 

A Great Deal for Commodore 
Users! 

• SpeedScript for the 64 

• SpeedScript 128 — 80 -column version 

• Spelling checkers 

• Mail merge 

• Date-and-time stamp 

• 80 -column preview for the 64 

• Ibrbo save and load 

• Plus more than a dozen other SpeedScript 
support utilities all on one disk (includin 
fuU documentation) 




■ t&« Send me copies 
SpeedScript Disk. 


of COMPUTE'S 


I've enclosed $11.95 plus fZ.OO postage and handling. (Outside 
US, and Canada add 11.00 for surface mail or $3-00 for 
airmail.) 




Amount 


ORDER NOW! 


^alpi: Tflx* 


Total 


Name 




Address 


City Sratp 


7,\? 



Mail personal check or money order to 

Commodore SpeedScript Disk 

324 W. Wendover Ave,, Ste. 200 

Greensboro, NC 27408 

Rcsitlenis of Nor ill Carolina and Ncu- York, add appropriate tax for your area. Canadian 
orders, add 7'V, good and services [ax 

Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Program availabJe only on 5'4-inch disks, 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE a23 




DIVERSIONS 



FRED 



D ' ) G N A Z I O 



About a year ago I wrote a column 
announcing the Design-a-Robot 
Conlesl. Shortly after that piece 
appeared, COMPUTE! Publica- 
tions went through major changes, 
and the Design-a-Robot Contest had 
to be postponed. Recently weVe had a 
resurgence of interest in this contest, 
so we've decided to run it again. 

When I was a little kid, the only 
robots I saw were on TV and in the 
movies. Back then there were no real 
robots, only robots of fantasy and sci- 
ence fiction — robots like Robbie, To- 
bor, Klaatu, and Gog. That didn't 
stop me from trying to build a robot 
of my own. I scavenged parts from old 
bicycles, washing machines, photo- 
copiers, and toasters. I once even used 
a bedpan as a robot's body. During 
school I daydreamed about building a 
robot of my own — a man Friday, a 
servant, a buddy, a friend. 

When I grew up, I learned that 
while I was dreaming up make-believe 
robots, real robots were being built in 
the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The real 
robots looked like long skinny sea 
monsters with pliers for jaws. They 
were called roboi arms and were bolt- 
ed to factory floors. They painted cars, 
welded, and lifted heavy objects. 

NASA built other robots and 
launched them into outer space. In 
space or on earth, robots journeyed 
where humans could not go—into the 
poisonous atmosphere of Venus, the 
crushing gravitational pressure of 
Jupiter, and the cores of nuclear reac- 
tors. They became a sort of human 
telepresence that could explore the 
universe and take risks we humans 
dared not take. 

Robots began doing jobs that 
were dull, dirty, or dangerous. Robots 
never got sick, didn't take coffee 
breaks, had an infinite attention span, 
and could work three shifts without 
dropping. Bosses liked them because 
they never talked back, didn't go on 
strike, and didn't belong to a union. 

All these outer space, undersea, 
and factory robots were neat, but they 
weren't what I really wanted. 1 wanted 
a robot like C3P0, R2D2, or Vincent 



in Walt Disney's The Black Hole. 

For a while, in the early 1980s, it 
looked as if I would get my wish. As 
personal computers grew in populari- 
ty, a new field of personal robotics 
emerged. An International Personal 
Robotics Congress was held in Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, in April 1984. 
The following two years personal ro- 
bots were everywhere. Every week new 
robots came to my house so I could re- 
view them for COMPUTEI's Gazette 
or for the TV program I was on, "The 
New Tech Times.'* When the show's 
TV crew arrived, I would plug the ro- 
bots into my Commodore 64, turn 
them on, and let them roam the house. 




For one of the TV shows I had 27 ro- 
bots (monkeys, turtles, and robo-balls) 
all running at the same time. 

I was in seventh heaven. My 
childhood dreams had (almost) come 
true. But then the bottom fell out in 
the personal robotics business. No 
new robots came to stay. I was sad. I 
missed the whir and buzz of the little 
motors, the tire tracks across my 
scrambled eggs, and the occasional 
wandering robot who ended up stuck 
in the bathtub, wedged under the toi- 
let, or lost among the galoshes in the 
back of the closet. I missed their chip- 
per voices, their songs (like "Old Mac- 
Donald Had a Robot"), and their 
clever remarks when they encoun- 
tered the broom or the cat. "Hi!" 



they'd say. "Are you a human being?" 

I can't wait around any longer. If 
the robot revolution isn't going to 
happen on its own, FU make it happen 
with the Design-a-Robot contest. 

Entering the contest is easy. All 
you have to do is invent a new per- 
sonal robot on paper. It can be com- 
pletely original or a combination of all 
the robots you've seen, dreamed 
about, or imagined. Draw a picture of 
the robot, label all of its interesting 
parts, and describe what each part 
does. Show me how the robot relates 
to your computer. Does the computer 
control the robot? Does it program the 
robot? If so, how? How are the signals 
and commands transmitted and re- 
ceived? What kind of programming 
language should the robot use? Can 
you invent commands of your own? 

Along with the robot's diagram I 
would like a short description of what 
robots mean to you. Reach down into 
your heart. What would you do if you 
had a robot just Uke the robot you've 
designed? Be specific. Be imaginative. 
Be wild. Send me your creations. 

All entries must be received by 
August 30, 1991, and winners will be 
selected by October 15. The first-place 
winner will receive a model robot val- 
ued at $200; five runners-up will each 
receive a smaller robot valued at $30. 

Please send me your contest en- 
try (pictures, labels, description, and 
so on) to Design-a-Robot Contest, 
COMPUTE Publications, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 
Be sure to include your name, ad- 
dress, and telephone number. Win- 
ners must consent to have their robots 
featured in a future "Diversions" col- 
umn without additional compensa- 
tion. The odds of winning a prize will 
be determined by the number and 
quality of entries. The decision of the 
judges will be final, and COMPUTE 
Publications cannot be held responsi- 
ble for entries misdirected in the mail. 
Entries become the property of COM- 
PUTE Publications and cannot be re- 
turned. Employees of COMPUTE 
Publications are not eligible. H 



G-24 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




D 



ROGRAMS 



SIMON 



EDGEWORTH 



In ancient times humans regarded 
Jupiter as the ruler of the slc>'. Re- 
cently, interest in the giant planet 
has rocketed due to the weahh of 
new information discovered by the 
Voyager spaceships. This program 
displays the 1 6 major moons and their 
orbits around Jupiter. 

The program consists of two 
modules: JURBAS and JUP.ML. The 
first is written in BASIC. To avoid 
typing errors, use The Automatic 
Proofreader to type it in; see "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere in this section. When 
youVe finished typing it in, be sure to 
save a copy of the program. 

The second part of the program, 
JUP.ML, is written in machine lan- 
guage. Enter this module with MLX, 
our machine language entry program; 
again, see ^Typing Aids." When MLX 
prompts you, respond with the values 
given below. 

Starting address: COOO 
Ending address: C18F 

When you've finished entering 
JUP.ML, be sure to save it with that 
name to the same disk as JUP.BAS. 
Load and run JURBAS; it will auto- 
matically load JUP.ML. 

Choosing Moons 

After a short pause, the main menu 
will appear. You'll see a list with Jupi- 
ter at the top, then the 1 6 moons, 
starting with Metis (the moon closest 
to the planet) and ending with Sinope 
(the moon farthest from Jupiter). 
Use the up- and down-cursor 
keys to select which moon orbits you 
wish to see. Discs on the left of the 
screen will indicate which moons are 
currently selected. You can choose a 
group of either four or eight moons. 
Press the G key to display the moon 
orbits. After a pause for calculations, 
the graphic screen will appear. 

Orbit Graphics 

Jupiter is shown in the center of the 
screen. The scale depends on which 
moons you select, so Jupiter will ap- 
pear as a circle when you select the in- 



ner moons and as a dot when you 
select the outer moons. 

The moons are shown as dots at 
various distances from the planet. Press 
G, and the moons will move around 
the planet in their orbits, leaving a trace 
behind them. You can adjust the speed 
of the graphics by pressing the F key 
(faster) or the S key (slower). 

At the lower left corner of the 
screen, a readout shows how many 
earth days have elapsed. The innermost 
moons take only a few hours to com- 
plete an orbit. The outermost moons 
take more than an earth year. To halt 
the moons, press X. 



LEARN MORE ABOUT 

THE NUMEROUS 

MOONS THAT ORBIT 

AROUND THE PLANET 

JUPITER WITH THIS 

ASTRONOMY 

PROGRAM FOR 

THE 64 



Names and Facts 

While the graphic screen is halted, you 
can identify the moons shown by press- 
ing the N key. A moon will flash while 
its name appears on the screen. To 
identify the next moon, press N again. 
When a moon is flashing, you can 
press I to view information about it. 

To exit from any part of the pro- 
gram, simply press X. It will take you 
back to the previous screen. 



Comparing Moons 

Go back to the main menu and press 
the C key. The comparison menu will 
appear. Now hit P, D, E, or S to com- 
pare period, distance, eccentricity, or 
size, respectively. To make the figures 
more meaningful, the corresponding 
data for our own moon is also shown 
for comparison. 

Customizing 

You can easily change the program's 
colors on line 380, CO is the border 
color, CI is the screen color, C2 is the 
text color, and C3 is the color used for 
Jupiter and moon traces. Similarly, 
you can change the 1 6 moon colors on 
line 390, but don't make anything the 
same color as the screen, or it will be 
invisible- 

Callistro's orbit should appear 
circular on your screen. If not, try 
slightly adjusting the value of SC on 
line 380. 

If you want to tinker with the or- 
bits, here's the data format in lines 
1 10-270: name, diameter, semimajor 
axis, eccentricity, period, longitude of 
perihelion, longitude at start. 

Notes 

The graphics show views approxi- 
mately from the ecliptic north. When 
viewed from the north, all the planets 
and most of the moons in our solar 
system orbit counterclockwise. Notice 
that four of Jupiter's moons orbit the 
other way around. One possible expla- 
nation is that they might have been 
asteroids captured by Jupiter's gravi- 
tational field. 

JUP.BAS 

RF 100 REM COPYRIGHT 199L - CO 

MPUTE PUBLICATIONS INTL 
LTD - ALL RIGHTS RESER 

VED 
JK 110 DATA HETIS,40f 128,0, ,29 

5,0,0 
DX 120 DATA ADRASTEA, 40,129,0, 

.295,0,120 
PF 130 DATA AMALTHEA, 270X165X1 

50,180, .003, .439,0,231 
MD 140 DATA THESE , 80, 222, . 013 , 

.670,0,331 
XP 150 DATA 10, 3640,422, .004,1 

.77,0,233 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE G-25 




PROGRAMS 



DR 160 


DATA EUROPA, 3100, 671, .0 




1,112 


XE 


1040 


I=PA(M) :J=X*CS(I)+Y*SN 




1,3.55,0,273 


MS 


560 T=0:PRINT"{CLR}"TT$"MAI 






(I) :Y=Y*CS(I)-X*SN(I) : 


EQ 170 


DATA GANYMEDE, 527 0,1070 




N MENU": PRINT 






X=J 




,.001,7*16,0,81 


RC 


570 PRINTCHR$(113) "JUPITER" 


MF 


1050 


y=INT{YC+Y*RA(M)*YS) :X 


HG 180 


DATA CALLISTO, 4990, 1885 


BE 


580 FORI=0TO15:PRINT" "NA$( 






=INT(XC+X*RA(M)*XS) 




,.007,16,69,0,332 




I) :next 


XX 


1060 


IFY<4 0ORY>239ORX<14ORX 


EE 190 


DATA LEDA, 16,11110, ,14 7 


PE 


590 PRrNT:PRINT"UP/DOWN-SEL 






>333THENY=0:X=^0 




,240,280,309 




ECT MOONS" 


HE 


1070 


P0KES1+N,INT{X/256) : PO 


FG 200 


DATA HIMALIA, 96, 11470,. 
158,251,249,101 


JB 


600 PRrNT"G-GO";PRINT"C=COM 
PARE":PRINT"E=END PROGR 






KES2+N,XAND25 5:POKES3+ 
N,y:NEXT 


XE 210 


DATA LYSITHEA, 16, 11710, 




AM" 


RF 


1080 


SYS49281:SyS49331:IFHF 




,107,260,11,297 


EK 


610 IFMI>6THENMI=0 






THEN1150 


BG 220 


DATA ELARA,32,11740,,20 


AQ 


620 IFMI<0THENMI^6 


HX 


1090 


PRINT" "RIGHT${" "+STR 




7,260,149,81 


CK 


630 BI-(6ANDMI)*2 






$(INT(T)) ,3)"{UP}" 


DF 230 


DATA ANANKE, 16, 21200, .1 


KP 


640 BO^BI+3 + 4* (lANDMI) 


RR 


1100 


GETK$: IFK$=^""THENT^T+T 




7,-610,180,36 


DB 


650 PRINT" {HOME} {2 DOWN}":F 






S: GOTO 10 10 


FC 240 


DATA CARME,16,22600,,21 




ORI=^0TO15 


MM 


1110 


IFK$="X"THENGOSUB1600: 




,-690,6,239 


JF 


660 J=113;IFI<BI0RI>B0THENJ 






GOTO1150 


BQ 250 


DATA PASIPHAE, 16, 23500, 




= 32 


RQ 


1120 


IFK$^"F"THENTS=^TS*1.5: 




,38,-734,0,90 


MX 


670 PRINTCHR$(J) :NEXT 






IFTS>THTHENTS=TH 


BM 260 


DATA SINOPE,16,23700,.2 


XD 


680 POKE198,0 


PC 


1130 


IFK$="S"THENTS=TS/1,5: 




8,-760,226,243 


GJ 


690 GETK$:IFK$="G"THEN750 






IFTS<TLTHENTS=TL 


RM 27 


DATA OUR MOON, 3478,384, 


SP 


700 IFKS="C"THEN1200 


BE 


1140 


GOTO1100 




,055,27*32,0,0 


XJ 


710 IFK$="{DOWN}"THENMI=MI+ 


CX 


1150 


POKE198,0 


DR 280 


IFI=0THENr=l:LOAD"JUP.M 




1:GOTO610 


BM 


1160 


GETK$: IFK$="N"THEN1660 




L",8,l 


PE 


720 IFK$="{UP}*'THENMI=MI-1: 


FS 


1170 


IFK$="G"THENGOSUB1630; 


XX 290 


POKE55,0:POKE56,136:CLR 




GOTO610 






GOTD1100 




:Q = 16 


AF 


730 IFK$<>"E"THEN690 


CQ 


1180 


IFK$="X"THENGOSOB2010: ' 


JR 300 


DIHSN(255) ,CS(255) ,NA$( 


AG 


740 PRINT"{CLR}":END 






GDTO560 




Q),DI${Q) ,CR[Q) ,RA(Q) ,B 


SP 


750 PRINT"{CLR}"TT$:PRINTWT 


QQ 


1190 


GOTO1160 




C(Q) ,PE(Q) ,PA(Q) ,EA(Q} 




$ 


JJ 


1200 


PRINT" {CLRl"TT$"COMPAR 


JE 310 


V=53248:PP-34816:SP=368 


BJ 


760 ONMI+1GOSUB770,780,790, 






E MENU": PRINT 




56 




800,810,820, 8 30 :G0T08 4 


GE 


1210 


PRINT"P=PERIOD": PRINT 


DJ 320 


S 1=53 200 :S2=S 1+8 :S3=S2+ 

8 


QP 


770 TL=,0004:TS=.005:TH=.04 
: RET URN 


SK 


1220 


PRINT"D=DISTANCE" : PRIN 
T 


MF 330 


YC=139.5:XC«173*S:MI=0: 
RJ=71.6 


MC 


780 TL=.005:TS=.02:TH=.1;RE 
TURN 


GH 


1230 


PRINT"E=ECCENTRICITY" : 
PRINT 


SJ 340 


TT$="{RVS} THE MOONS OF 


EM 


790 tl=.02:ts=.1:th=.4:retu 


RE 


1240 


PRINT"S=SIZE":PRINT 




JUPITER {OFF} 




RN 


HP 


1250 


PRINT"X=MAIN MENU" 




{2 SPACES}" 


XC 


800 TL=,1:TS=,2:TH=,7;RETUR 


EE 


1260 


POKE198,0 


JM 350 


CP$="COMPUTE PUBLICATIO 




N 


JM 


1270 


GETK$: IFK$="X"THEN560 




NS INTL LTD (C) 1991" 


HF 


810 TL=,4:TS=3:TH=12:RETURN 


HG 


1280 


K=VAL(K$) 


JB 360 


WT$="{3 DOWN}CALCULATIO 


FH 


820 TL=1:TS==4:TH^1€:RETURN 


SG 


1290 


IFK$="P"THEN1340 




NS WILL TAKE A FEW SECO 


GS 


830 TL»I,5:TS=6:TH=45;RETUR 


FK 


1300 


IFK$="D"THEN1410 




NDS . . .":CH$="COMPARIS0 




N 


RC 


1310 


IFK$^"E"THEN1460 




N" 


AR 


840 MA=RA(B0)*{1+EC(B0)) 


AP 


1320 


IFK$="S"THEN1520 


RS 370 


DJS=" DISTANCE FROM CEN 


FE 


850 YS=99/MA:XS=YS*SC 


MH 


1330 


GOTO1270 




TER OF JUPITER" :TK$="TH 


BD 


860 QB=BO"BI;CN=0 


AR 


1340 


PRINT" {CLR} "TT$CM$ : PHI 




OUSAND KM" 


BQ 


870 FORN=0TOQB:POKEV+39+N,C 






NT 


FS 380 


C0=06:C1=0;C2=14:C3^11: 




R(N+BI):NEXT 


PA 


1350 


PRINT"ORBIT PERIOD" 




SC=1,3 


SQ 


880 FORr=0TO23:POKESl-l-I,0:N 


DH 


1360 


PRINT" (EARTH DAYS)": PR 


RF 390 


DATA 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 




EXT:SYS49281 ■ 






INT 




,12,13,14,15,4,3,2 


BX 


890 POKE53247,Cl+C3*16:SYS4 


FQ 


1370 


FORI=0TO16 


EK 400 


PRIi^T" {CLR} "CHR5 (142)CH 
RS (8) :CT = 11 


MF 


9521 ' 
900 FORI=36800TOI+63:POKEI, ' 


MR 


1380 


PRINTNA$(I) ,ABS(PE(I) ) 


PG 410 


POKEV+32 ,C0 : POKEV+33 ,C1 




32:NEXT 


XS 


1390 


IFPE (I)<0THENPRINT"RET 




:POKE646,C2 


AS 


910 SYS49208 ' 






ROGRADE"? 


KA 420 


PRINT CP$:PRINT 


QP 


920 IFMK3THEN960 


FH 


1400 


PRINT:NEXT:GOTO1570 


BR 430 


PRINTTAB(8)TT$:PRINTWT$ 


PH 


930 FORI=158TO160:FORJ=98TO 


XK 


1410 


PRI NT " {CLR } "TT $CM$ ; PRI 


BS 440 


FORI-0TO2 55:J=I*X/128 




100 






NT 


JA 450 


SN{I)=SIN(J) :CS(I)-COS ( 
J) :NEXT 


GK 


940 POKE253,I:POKE254,0:POK 
E255,J 


DH 


1420 


PRI NT "AVERAGE DISTANCE 
FROM PLANET CENTER" 


KM 460 


FORN^0TOQ 


FP 


950 SyS49373:NEXT:NEXT:GOT0 


SB 


1430 


PR*I NT "(THOUSAND KM)":P 


BS 470 


READNA$(N) ,DI$(N) ,RA(N) 




1000 






RINT 




,EC(N) ,PE{N) ,J,K 


MM 


960 FORI=0TO255 


KD 


1440 


FORI=0TO16 


KH 480 


PA (N) = (J* 256/360+ , 5 ) AND 
255 


DS 


970 POKE253,159,5+XS*RJ*SN( 
I) :POKE254,0 


ME 


1450 


PRINTNAS(I) ,RA(I) :NEXT 
:GOTO1570 


PM 490 


EA(N)=(K-J)/360:NEXT 


JH 


980 P0KE255,99.5+YS*RJ*CS(I 


BF 


1460 


PRINT" {CLR] "TT$CM5: PRI 


KP 500 


FORN=0TOQ-1:READCR(N) ;N 




) 






NT 




EXT 


SG 


990 SYS49373:NEXT 


SO 


1470 


PRINT"ORBIT ECCENTRICI 


FC 510 


FORI =PPT0PP^-126 : POKEI ,0 


PE 


1000 GOSUB1980:GOSUB1600 






TY" 




:NEXT 


MJ 


1010 FORN=0TOQB:M=N+BI:E=EC 


XJ 


1480 


PRINT" (CIRCLE = 0)":PRIN 


QQ 520 


POKEPP+28,112:POKEPP+31 




(M) :A-EA(M)+T/PE(M) 






T 




,112 


SG 


1020 A=( (A-INT(A))*256+,5}A 


MH 


1490 


FORI=0TO16 


KP 530 


P0KEPPf3 4,112:POKEPP+89 
,112 




ND255: IFE< . 1THENX=-CS ( 
A) ;y=SN(A) :GOTO1050 


MQ 


1500 


PRINTNA${I),:IFEC{I)<. 
01THENPRINT0: NEXT: GOTO 


CB 54 


POKEPP4-92,24 8:POKEPP + 95 


QD 


1030 Z=(E*E-1>/(E*CS{A)"1) : 






1570 




,248 




X=2*E-Z*CS (A) : Y=Z*SN (A 


XR 


1510 


PRINTEC(I) :NEXT:G0T015 


JD 550 


POKEPP+98 , 248 : POKEPP+10 




> 






70 



G-26 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



DG 1520 

SB 1530 
JS 1540 
QH 1550 
HF 1560 

PG 1570 

FA 1580 
JM 1590 
AB 16 00 
FG 1610 

CC 1620 

XC 1630 
JQ 1640 



BA 1650 
XS 1660 
QM 1670 
FK 1680 



QB 1690 

AP 1700 

FS 1710 

DD 1720 

PX 1730 

XS 1740 

QE 17 50 

KK 1760 

FQ 1770 

MH 178 

HK 1790 

KC 1800 

QH 1810 

SC 1820 



:NEX 



:P0 



PRINT" {CLR} '*TT$CH$lPRI 

NT 

PRINT"DIAMETER" 

PRINT" (KM) ": PRINT 

FORI=0TO16 

PRINTNA${I) ,DI$(I) ; 

T:GOTO1570 

PRINT: PRIHT"X=MENU" 

KS198,0 

GETK$; IFK$="X"THEN12 00 

GOTO 1580 

GOSUB1790 

PRINT"G=GO N^NAME X=^ME 

NUCUPl" 

HF=1: RETURN 

GOSUB1790 

PRINT"{4 SPAGESjEARTH 

(SPACE}DAYS{2 SPACESjF 

=FAST S=SLOW X=HALT 

(UP}" 

HF«0: RETURN 

POKE19e,0 

GOSUB1790:CM=CN+BI 

PRINT"*''NA$(CM) "*"TAB{ 

11)"I = INF0 N^NEXT X=^CO 

NTINUEfUP}" 

J=9 

J=J+1 : 1FJ*10THENPOKESP 

+CN,3 3 

IFJ>19THENJ«0:POKESPfC 

N,32 

GETK$: IFK$ = "'»THEN1700 

POKESP+CN,32 

IFK$^"I"THEN1800 

IFK$^"X"THENGOSUB1600: 

GOTO II 50 

IFK$<>"N"THEN1690 

CN^CN + 1 : IFCN>QBTHENCN'= 



GOTO1660 

PRINT" {37 SPACES} {UP}" 

: RETURN 

GOSUB2010 

PRINT" {CLR}"TT$: PRINT 

PRINT"*"NA$(CM)"*":PRI 





NT 


C030 


:A9 


00 


8D 


14 


03 


4C 


31 


EA 


10 


DC 1830 


PRINT"AVERAGE"DJ$:PRIN 


C038 


:A9 


00 


85 


FB 


A9 


A0 


85 


FC 


D6 




TRA(CM)TK$:PRINT 


C040 


:A9 


00 


A8 


A2 


20 


91 


FB 


C8 


DD 


DR 1840 


PR1NT"MINIMUM"DJ$:PRIN 


C048 


:D0 


FB 


E6 


FC 


CA 


D0 


F6 


60 


C5 




TINT(RA(CH)*{1"EC{CH) ) 


C050 


:AD 


00 


DD 


29 


FC 


09 


01 


3D 


92 




+.5)TK$:PRINT 


C058 


:00 


OD 


A9 


8C 


8D 


88 


02 


60 


42 


HD 1850 


PRINT"HAXIMUM"DJ9: PRIN 


C060 


'78 


A9 


7F 


8D 


0D 


DC 


A9 


01 


81 




TINT(RA(CH)*{i-»-EC(CM) ) 


C068 


.8D 


lA 


D0 


A9 


IB 


8D 


11 


D0 


ED 




+.5)TK$:PRINT 


C070 


:A9 


F2 


8D 


12 


D0 


A9 


00 


8D 


11 


AH 1860 


PRINT"ORBIT ECCENTRICI 


C078 


:14 


03 


A9 


C0 


8D 


15 


03 


58 


25 




TY" 


C080 


:60 


A2 


07 


BD 


D0 


CF 


4A 


2E 


20 


CK 1870 


IFEC (CM)C*01THENPRINT0 


C088 


:F8 


CF 


CA 


10 


F6 


A2 


07 


A0 


C5 




:PRINT:GOTO1890 


C090 


:0F 


BD 


E0 


CF 


99 


E8 


CF 


88 


BA 


EK 1880 


PRINTEC(CM) :PRINT 


C098 


:BD 


D8 


CF 


99 


E8 


CF 


88 


CA 


25 


HC 1890 


PRINT"ORBIT PERIOD" 


C0A0 


:10 


EF 


A2 


10 


AD 


11 


D0 


10 


DE 


EE 1900 


PRINTABS (PE (CM) ) "EARTH 


C0A8 


:FB 


BD 


E8 


CF 


9D 


00 


D0 


CA 


0B 




DAYS": PRINT 


C0B0 


:10 


F7 


60 


A2 


07 


8E 


F9 


CF 


A4 


RK 1910 


PRINT"DIAMETER" 


C0B8 


.BD 


E0 


CF 


F0 


IC 


38 


E9 


28 


18 


BX 1920 


PRINT" "DI${CM) " KM":P 


C0C0 


:35 


FF 


BD 


D0 


CF 


85 


FE 


BD 


lA 




RINT 


C0C8 


:D8 


CF 


38 


E9 


0E 


85 


FD 


B0 


83 


QX 193 


PRINT"X-CONTIN0E" 


C0D0 


.02 


C6 


FE 


20 


DD 


C0 


AE 


F9 


30 


BB 1940 


POKE198,0 


C0D8 


;CF 


CA 


10 


D9 


60 


A9 


00 


85 


C3 


PK 1950 


GETK$ 


C0E0 


,02 


A5 


FF 


29 


F8 


0A 


26 


02 


9D 


JS 1960 


IFK$-"X"THENGOSUB1980 : 


C0E8 


:0A 


26 


02 


0A 


26 


02 


85 


FB 


lA 




GOTO1660 


C0F0 


A6 


02 


86 


FC 


0A 


26 


02 


0A 


DD 


XC 1970 


GOTO1950 


C0F8 


:26 


02 


18 


65 


FB 


8.5 


FB 


A5 


FA 


HF 1980 


POKE808,234:SYS49232:S 


CI 00 


:02 


65 


FC 


85 


FC 


A5 


FD 


29 


79 




YS49248 


C10e 


:F8 


18 


65 


FB 


85 


FB 


A5 


FE 


E0 


FG 1990 


POKEV+21,2|(QB+l)-l:PR 


C110 


65 


FC 


85 


FC 


A5 


FF 


29 


07 


8C 




INT" {HOME}" 


C118 


18 


65 


FB 


85 


FB 


A9 


A0 


65 


06 


AP 2000 


FORI=2T024:PRINT" 


C120 


FC 


85 


FC 


A5 


01 


29 


FE 


85 


AD 




{ DOWN } " ; : NE XT : RETURN 


C128 


.01 


A5 


FD 


29 


07 


AA 


A9 


00 


IE 


RX 2010 


SYS49474:SYS49497:POKE 


C130 


38 


6A 


CA 


10 


FC 


A0 


00 


11 


40 




808,237 . 


C138 


FB 


91 


FB 


A5 


01 


09 


01 


85 


AB 


JQ 2020 


POKEV+21,0: RETURN 


C140 


01 


60 


78 


A9 


00 


8D 


lA 


D0 


41 






CI48 


A9 


31 


8D 


14 


03 


A9 


EA 


SD 


02 


JUP.ML 




C150 


15 


03 


A9 


81 


8D 


0D 


DC 


58 


IF 




C158 


60 


AD 


00 


DD 


09 


03 


BD 


00 


C4 






CI60 


DD 


A9 


14 


8D 


18 


D0 


A9 


04 


F3 


C000:A9 


0F 8D 19 D0 A9 IB 8D 4E 


C168 


8D 


88 


02 


A9 


IB 


8D 


11 


D0 


Bl 


C008:ll 


D0 A9 34 8D 18 D0 A9 06 


C170 


60 


A9 


00 


85 


FB 


A9 


8C 


85 


0C 


C010:FF 


8D 12 D0 A9 IC 8D 14 31 


C178 


FC 


AD 


FF 


CF 


A0 


00 


A2 


04 


31 


C018:03 


4C 81 EA A9 0F 8D 19 CA 


C180 


91 


FB 


ca 


D0 


FB 


E6 


FC 


CA 


32 


C020:D0 


A9 38 8D 18 D0 A9 3B E6 


cise 


D0 


F6 


60 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


3E 


C028:8D 


11 D0 A9 F2 8D 12 D0 2C 




















m 



DANIEL 



L I G H T N E R 



If you call an electronic bulletin 
board system (BBS) and browse 
through its library of programs 
available for downloading, chances 
are that many of the files have been 
archived — that is, several programs 
and instruction files may have been 
combined into one master program. 
If all of a program's related files 
have been combined, a caller has only 
to download one file to obtain all the 
programs, modules, sprite data, music 
files, and instructions required for 
proper operation. Archiving (or arcing 
as it's often called) is a convenient 
method for uploading and download- 
ing BBS files. 

Some archived files need a spe- 
cial rate program to separate (or 
dearc) the files into their original 
form. Others are self-dearcing (SDA), 
meaning that one has only to load and 
run the master program for it to sepa- 




ARCHIVE FILES FOR 

EASY UPLOADING 

AND DOWNLOADING 

'WITH THIS UTILITY FOR 

THE 64 



rate and save its individual files to 
disk, ready for running. 

Typing It In 

Noah's Arc is such a program. It cre- 
ates SDA files that separate automati- 
cally. It is written entirely in machine 
language, but it loads and runs like a 
BASIC program. Use AfLX our ma- 
chine language entry program, to type 
it in; see "Typing Aids" elsewhere in 
this section. When MLX prompts, re- 
spond with the following values. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 1298 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 

Using the Program 

Noah's Arc will load a collection of 
files and save them in a single master 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE C-27 




PROGRAMS 



file. It accepts program, sequential, or 
user files, and it does not matter if dif- 
ferent types are loaded together. In ad- 
dition to making it convenient for 
sending files via modem, SDA files 
are also useful for creating backups. 

When you run Noah, it asks for 
the number of files you wish to ar- 
chive. Respond with a number less 
than 100. Try not to use more files 
than will fit into memory at one lime. 
Noah can handle about 160 disk 
blocks, depending on the number of 
files, not the file size. Noah reserves 
25 bytes of memory per file in its own 
directory located at $0960 hex or 2480 
decimal. This director)' has to be 
saved along with the SDA file. 

If you aren't sure of the number 
of files, you can check the directory by 
entering $ and pressing Return. The 
directory listing can be stopped and 
started by touching any key. This is 
useful in determining which and how 
many files you wish to load. 

After you enter the number, 
Noah asks for the filenames. It will 
then ask if it is a program, sequential, 
or user file. Just press the correspond- 
ing number. Noah checks the disk for 
that file and returns the disk error sta- 
tus. If all is well, it continues loading 
the file into memory. 

This process repeats until the 
memory is full or all the files have 
been loaded. Anytime you are asked 
for a filename, you can enter $ to get a 
directory or enter @ to abort and save 
the files already loaded. 

When all the files have been load- 
ed, Noah asks for a master filename. 
At this point make sure that the disk 
has enough room on it for the file you 
are saving, Noah appends an SDA suf- 
fix automatically to the file name. If a 
disk error occurs during a save, Noah 
lets you try the procedure again. 

Noah can be useful as a file copier 
as well. If you enter @ when Noah 
prompts for a Save filename, it will 
dump all files in memory to disk in 
their original form. To make more 
copies of these files, when Noah 
comes back with a prompt asking if 
you wish to create more files, press N, 
and you will be returned to BASIC 
Put another disk in the drive and en- 
ter SYS2088. You can repeat this pro- 
cess as many times as you like. Noah 
always saves to drive 8. 

If you load an SDA file and list it, 
youUl see the number of files the SDA 



file contains. To dearc an SDA file, 
just load and run it. If you wish to 
save an SDA file to another disk, load 
it and enter SYS2088. 

Most smaller SDA files can be 
loaded and saved like BASIC pro- 
grams, but some larger ones may jxjse 
a problem because Noah stores files 
under BASIC ROM. If you t^^ saving 
a file that is too big, you'll get an OUT 
OF MEMORY message. Noah's Arc 
itself can be loaded and saved like a 
BASIC program, but do not try to 
save it after it's been run. If you wish 
to restart it at any time, enter 
SYS50675 and press Return. 



NOAH'S ARC 














0801 


22 


08 


0A 


00 


9E 


32 


30 


38 


BB 


0809 


-38 


20 


20 


3A 


31 


39 


39 


31 


F6 


0811 


;20 


43 


4F 


4D 


50 


55 


54 


45 


86 


0819 


:2E 


2E 


2E 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


75 


0821 


£00 


00 


00 


0B 


0A 


F3 


C5 


AD 


3B 


8 29 


•24 


08 


8D 


B2 


02 


AD 


25 


08 


4 3 


0831 


:8D 


B3 


02 


AD 


26 


08 


85 


FD 


6A 


0839 


AD 


27 


08 


85 


FE 


A9 


8E 


85 


84 


0841 


FB 


A9 


08 


85 


FC 


18 


A5 


FB 


A2 


0849 


6D 


B2 


02 


8D 


B4 


02 


A5 


FC 


CB 


0851 


.6D 


83 


02 


8D 


B5 


02 


A0 


00 


15 


0859 


Bl 


FB 


91 


FD 


18 


A5 


FB 


69 


0C 


0861 


01 


85 


FB 


A5 


FC 


69 


00 


85 


40 


0869 


FC 


18 


A5 


FD 


69 


01 


85 


PD 


EA 


0871 


A5 


FE 


69 


00 


85 


FE 


A5 


PB 


B0 


0879 


CD 


B4 


02 


F0 


03 


4C 


88 


08 


4F 


0881 


.A5 


FC 


CD 


B5 


02 


F0 


03 


4C 


DE 


0889 


59 


08 


6C 


26 


08 


AD 


0E 


DC 


28 


0891 


29 


FE 


8D 


0E 


DC 


A5 


01 


29 


31 


0899 


FE 


85 


01 


AD 


0E 


DC 


09 


01 


7C 


08A1 


8D 


0E 


DC 


20 


CC 


FF 


A9 


00 


53 


08A9 


8D 


B4 


02 


8D 


20 


D0 


8D 


21 


47 


08B1 


D0 


A9 


0B 


8 5 


73 


A9 


CD 


65 


Bl 


08B9 


74 


20 


F9 


CC 


A9 


36 


85 


73 


BC 


08C1 


A9 


CD 


85 


74 


20 


F9 


CC 


20 


B4 


08C9 


6A 


C9 


AD 


35 


03 


C9 


24 


D0 


E2 


08D1 


06 


20 


80 


CC 


4C 


22 


C6 


AD 


EF 


08D9 


34 


03 


C9 


03 


80 


DE 


C9 


00 


C2 


08E1 


F0 


DA 


A0 


00 


B9 


35 


03 


C9 


A7 


08E9 


30 


90 


Dl 


C9 


3A 


B0 


CD 


C8 


06 


08F1 


CC 


34 


03 


D0 


EF 


20 


34 


CA 


16 


08F9 


20 


45 


CB 


20 


76 


CA 


C9 


27 


80 


0901 


F0 


BA 


20 


E8 


C9 


A0 


00 


A9 


47 


0909 


01 


85 


FB 


A9 


08 


85 


PC 


B9 


21 


0911 


64 


CD 


91 


FB 


C8 


C0 


C8 


D0 


66 


0919 


F6 


A0 


00 


A9 


C9 


85 


PB 


A9 


6F 


0921 


08 


85 


FC 


B9 


2C 


CE 


91 


PB 


8F 


0929 


G8 


C0 


E9 


D0 


F6 


AD 


B5 


02 


F5 


0931 


8D 


B0 


09 


A9 


B0 


8D 


BA 


02 


25 


0939 


A9 


09 


8D 


BB 


02 


A0 


00 


18 


7A 


09 41 


AD 


BA 


02 


69 


19 


8D 


BA 


02 


26 


0949 


AD 


BB 


02 


69 


00 


8D 


BB 


02 


A? 


0951 


C8 


CC 


B5 


02 


D0 


E9 


18 


A9 


D9 


0959 


B0 


69 


01 


8D 


B2 


02 


A9 


09 


11 


0961 


69 


00 


8D 


B3 


02 


AD 


C5 


02 


69 


0969 


8D 


16 


08 


AD 


C6 


02 


8D 


17 


14 


0971 


08 


20 


F4 


CC 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


67 


0979 


6A 


CA 


20 


FA 


CC 


20 


6A 


C9 


4C 


0981 


AD 


34 


03 


C9 


01 


D0 


14 


AD 


95 


0989 


35 


03 


C9 


40 


F0 


0A 


C9 


24 


9B 


0991 


D0 


09 


20 


80 


CC 


4C 


D7 


C6 


68 


0999 


4C 


DE 


C8 


20 


34 


CA 


20 


76 


28 


09A1 


CA 


C9 


27 


F0 


CC 


A0 


00 


B9 


22 


09A9 


E4 


CF 


20 


D2 


FF 


C0 


05 


F0 


51 



09B1 


42 


C0 


09 


F0 


44 


C0 


0D 


F0 


75 


09B9 


46 


C8 


C0 


10 


D0 


E9 


A5 


CB 


7F 


09C1 


C9 


38 


F0 


0E 


C9 


3B 


F0 


15 


F7 


09C9 


C9 


08 


F0 


IC 


20 


E4 


PF 


4C 


83 


09D1 


24 


C7 


85 


FB 


20 


EF 


CC 


20 


D2 


09D9 


49 


CA 


4C 


6B 


C7 


85 


PB 


20 


EF 


09E1 


EF 


CC 


20 


5F 


CA 


4C 


68 


C7 


3F 


09E9 


85 


FB 


20 


EF 


CC 


20 


54 


CA 


IB 


09F1 


4C 


6B 


C7 


20 


49 


CA 


4C 


IF 


2D 


09F9 


C7 


20 


5F 


CA 


4C 


IF 


C7 


20 


IF 


0A01 


54 


CA 


4C 


IF 


C7 


A9 


0D 


20 


8C 


0A09 


76 


CA 


C9 


27 


D0 


03 


4C 


0B 


EC 


0A11' 


C7 


A5 


FB 


C9 


38 


F0 


08 


C9 


ED 


0A19 


3B 


P0 


0A 


C9 


08 


F0 


0C 


20 


21 


0A21 


91 


CA 


4C 


94 


C7 


20 


A6 


CA 


5A 


0A29 


4C 


94 


C7 


20 


BB 


CA 


20 


E5 


B2 


0A31 


eCA 


AC 


34 


03 


88 


A9 


52 


99 


B5 


0A39 


35 


03 


20 


F4 


CC 


20 


F4 


CB 


98 


0A41 


20 


3A 


CA 


20 


F4 


CC 


AD 


34 


89 


0A49 


03 


A2 


3 5 


A0 


03 


20 


BD 


FF 


4C 


0A51 


A9 


02 


A2 


08 


A0 


02 


20 


BA 


97 


0A59 


FF 


20 


C0 


FF 


20 


2F 


C9 


C9 


A8 


0A61 


:0D 


F0 


33 


A2 


02 


20 


C6 


FF 


E6 


0A69 


AD 


BA 


02 


85 


FD 


AD 


BB 


02 


BB 


0A71 


85 


FE 


A0 


00 


20 


E4 


FF 


91 


42 


0A79 


FD 


18 


A5 


FD 


69 


01 


85 


FD 


7F 


0A81 


:A5 


FE 


69 


00 


85 


FE 


A 5 


FD 


C6 


0A89 


:C9 


Fl 


F0 


2C 


20 


B7 


FF 


C9 


89 


0A91 


:40 


F0 


3B 


4C 


DA 


C7 


20 


2A 


8E 


0A99 


:C8 


20 


5 


C8 


4C 


D7 


C6 


AD 


44 


0AA1 


C0 


02 


8D 


B2 


02 


AD 


CI 


02 


BF 


0AA9 


.80 


B3 


02 


AD 


C2 


02 


80 


BA 


80 


0AB1 


:02 


AD 


C3 


02 


8D 


BB 


02 


60 


8A 


0AB9 


;A5 


FE 


C9 


C5 


F0 


03 


4C 


F2 


15 


0AC1 


:C7 


4C 


CD 


C8 


A2 


00 


20 


C6 


2F 


0AC9 


:FF 


A9 


02 


4C 


C3 


FF 


20 


2A 


D5 


0AD1 


:C8 


AD 


B2 


02 


85 


FB 


AD 


B3 


57 


0AD9 


:02 


85 


FC 


A0 


00 


A5 


FD 


91 


IE 


0AE1 


:FB 


C8 


A5 


FE 


91 


FB 


18 


A5 


ID 


0AE9 


.FB 


69 


02 


8D 


B2 


02 


A5 


FC 


55 


0AF1 


.69 


00 


8D 


B3 


02 


18 


A5 


FD 


61 


0AF9 


:69 


01 


3D 


BA 


02 


A5 


FE 


69 


6E 


0B01 


:00 


8D 


BB 


02 


20 


F4 


CC 


20 


A0 


0B09 


:2F 


C9 


C9 


0D 


F0 


91 


20 


5B 


9F 


0B11 


:CC 


18 


AD 


B4 


02 


69 


01 


8D 


D9 


0B19 


:B4 


02 


CD 


B0 


09 


F0 


03 


4C 


2D 


0B21 


:D7 


C6 


20 


F4 


CC 


20 


F4 


CC 


C5 


0B29 


:20 


EF 


CC 


A9 


12 


20 


D2 


FF 


36 


0B31 


:20 


6A 


CA 


20 


DE 


CB 


20 


F4 


A8 


0B39 


:CC 


20 


6A 


C9 


AD 


34 


03 


C9 


B5 


0B4i 


:01 


D0 


14 


AD 


35 


03 


C9 


40 


F2 


0B49 


:D0 


0D 


A9 


9E 


8D 


81 


09 


A 9 


58 


0B51 


:CB 


8D 


82 


09 


4C 


28 


08 


20 


C4 


0B59 


34 


CA 


20 


76 


CA 


C9 


27 


F0 


64 


0B61 


CI 


20 


D0 


CA 


4C 


50 


CB 


A9 


0C 


0B69 


.40 


85 


73 


A9 


CF 


85 


74 


20 


A7 


0B71 


F9 


CC 


20 


5E 


CC 


20 


05 


C8 


58 


0B79 


A9 


C2 


85 


73 


A9 


CF 


85 


74 


09 


0B81 


20 


F9 


CC 


20 


2A 


C8 


A5 


CB 


40 


0B89 


C9 


0D 


F0 


14 


C9 


0A 


F0 


0A 


89 


0B91 


C9 


14 


F0 


09 


20 


E4 


FF 


4C 


21 


0B99 


.EC 


C8 


4C 


9E 


CB 


4C 


D7 


C6 


Dl 


0BA1 


A0 


00 


AD 


B4 


02 


8D 


B0 


09 


B9 


0BA9 


85 


FB 


38 


E9 


0A 


90 


04 


C8 


8A 


0BB1 


4C 


10 


C9 


69 


0A 


85 


FB 


98 


B8 


0BB9 


18 


6 9 


30 


8D 


16 


08 


18 


A5 


BB 


0BC1 


FB 


69 


30 


8D 


17 


08 


4C 


88 


09 


0BC9 


C8 


A5 


BA 


20 


B4 


FF 


A9 


6F 


6F 


0BD1 


:85 


B9 


20 


96 


FF 


A9 


0D 


20 


67 


0BD9 


D2 


FF 


A9 


20 


A0 


00 


20 


D2 


A8 


0BE1 


.FF 


99 


E4 


02 


C8 


20 


A 5 


FF 


2D 


0BE9 


C9 


0D 


D0 


F2 


20 


D2 


FF 


20 


DD 


0BFI 


AB 


FP 


AD 


E5 


02 


G9 


30 


D0 


5A 


0BF9 


08 


AD 


E6 


02 


C9 


30 


D0 


01 


2E 


0C01, 


60 


A9 


0D 


60 


20 


E4 


FF 


A0 


90 


0C09: 


00 


20 


F4 


CC 


20 


EF 


CC 


A 9 


98 


0C11; 


3E 


20 


D2 


FF 


A9 


9A 


20 


D2 


75 



G-28 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



0C19:FF 


A9 


00 


80 


34 


03 


20 


E4 


47 


0E89:CF 


85 


74 


4C 


F9 


CC 


A9 


97 


30 


10F9:A9 0D 20 D2 FF AD 


C4 


02 A5 


0C21: 


FF 


C9 


00 


F0 


F9 


C9 


14 


F0 


CA 


0E91:85 


73 


A9 


CF 


85 


74 


4C 


F9 


10 


1101: 


AE C6 02 AC C7 02 


20 


BD 7B 


0C29; 


40 


C9 


7B 


B0 


Fl 


C9 


11 


F0 


18 


0E99:CC 


A9 


AC 


85 


73 


A9 


CF 


85 


DB 


1109: 


FF A9 02 A2 08 A0 


02 


20 E6 


0C31; 


EO 


C9 


13 


F0 


E9 


C9 


ID 


F0 


C5 


0EA1:74 


4C 


F9 


CC 


20 


EF 


CC 


A9 


IB 


1111: 


BA FF 20 C0 FF A2 


02 


20 4F 


0C39: 


E5 


C9 


22 


F0 


El 


C9 


2C 


F0 


89 


0EA9:00 


80 


D3 


02 


A5 


FC 


A6 


FB 


2E 


1119: 


C9 FF A0 00 AD C0 


02 


85 2E 


0C41: 


00 


C9 


00 


F0 


10 


AC 


34 


03 


0A 


0EB1:8O 


01 


02 


8E 


D0 


02 


A2 


09 


0F 


1121: 


FB AD CI 02 85 FC 


AD 


C2 43 


0C49: 


C0 


10 


F0 


D2 


20 


02 


FF 


20 


70 


0EB9:8E 


02 


02 


A0 


B0 


AO 


00 


02 


FB 


1129: 


02 85 FD AD C3 02 


85 


FE 78 


0C51: 


C5 


09 


4C 


84 


C9 


AC 


34 


03 


FC 


0EC1:OO 


F3 


CF 


AD 


Dl 


02 


FD 


F4 


26 


1131: 


Bl FB 20 D2 FF 18 


A5 


FB 04 


0C59: 


C0 


00 


F0 


C2 


4C 


D2 


FF 


AC 


76 


0EC9:CF 


90 


0F 


80 


Dl 


02 


AD 


00 


6F 


1139: 


69 01 85 FB A5 FC 


69 


00 B4 


0C61: 


34 


03 


99 


35 


03 


EE 


34 


03 


lA 


0ED1:02 


FO 


F3 


CF 


SO 


00 


02 


C8 


66 


1141: 


35 FC A5 FB C5 FD 


F0 


03 E4 


0C69: 


60 


AC 


34 


03 


C0 


01 


B0 


03 


02 


0ED9:D0 


E3 


98 


CA 


F0 


11 


C9 


B0 


27 


114 9: 


4C 33 09 A5 FC C5 


FE 


F0 C7 


0C7L; 


4C 


84 


C9 


20 


02 


FF 


38 


AD 


C0 


0EE1:F0 


03 


80 


02 


02 


2C 


D2 


02 


7E 


1151: 


03 4C 33 09 A2 00 


20 


C9 IE 


0C79: 


34 


03 


E9 


01 


8D 


34 


03 


4C 


49 


0EE9:30 


05 


AD 


03 


02 


F0 


05 


29 


59 


1159- 


FF A9 02 20 C3 FF 


20 


83 0A 


0C81: 


84 


C9 


AO 


34 


03 


C9 


01 


F0 


79 


0EFl:7F 


20 


02 


FF 


CA 


10 


C4 


60 


B0 


1161 


09 4C 6F 08 AD 0E 


DC 


29 12 


0C89: 


05 


C9 


02 


F0 


13 


60 


A9 


20 


73 


0EF9:A0 


00 


20 


F4 


CC 


A 9 


Fl 


85 


30 


116 9 


FE 8D 0E DC A5 01 


09 


01 42 


0C91: 


8D 


C5 


02 


AD 


35 


03 


80 


C6 


94 


0F01:FB 


A9 


C5 


85 


FC 


38 


A5 


FB 


A8 


1171 


85 01 AD 0E DC 09 


01 


SD C7 


0C99: 


02 


38 


E9 


30 


80 


B5 


02 


60 


A8 


0F09:ED 


BA 


02 


85 


FB 


A5 


FC 


ED 


C3 


1179 


0E DC CE B0 09 4C 


E2 


FC FA 


0CA1: 


AO 


35 


03 


80 


C5 


02 


38 


E9 


A7 


0F11:BB 


02 


85 


FC 


20 


0A 


CC 


4C 


10 


1181 


20 CC FF A5 BA 20 


B4 


FF 01 


0CA9: 


30 


A8 


A9 


00 


BD 


B5 


02 


18 


98 


0F19:FF 


CB 


A9 


01 


A2 


08 


A0 


00 


E5 


1189 


A9 6F 85 B9 20 96 


FF 


A9 AD 


0CB1: 


AO 


B5 


02 


69 


0A 


8D 


B5 


02 


08 


0F21:20 


BA 


FF 


A9 


01 


A2 


EE 


A0 


A9 


1191 


0D 20 D2 FF 20 A5 


FF 


C9 FD i 


0CB9: 


88 


C0 


00 


00 


F2 


AO 


36 


03 


11 


0F29:CC 


20 


BD 


FF 


20 


C0 


FF 


A2 


14 


1199 


0D D0 F6 20 D2 FF 


4C 


AB 32 


0CC1: 


8D 


C6 


02 


38 


E9 


30 


18 


60 


C3 


0F31;01 


20 


C6 


FF 


20 


E8 


CC 


20 


0F 


llAl 


FF 0D 53 41 56 49 


4E 


47 41 


0CC9: 


B5 


02 


8D 


B5 


02 


60 


20 


F4 


11 


0F39:OA 


CC 


F0 


30 


A5 


C6 


F0 


12 


55 


11A9 


20 2C 50 2C 57 2C 


55 


2C F5 


0CD1: 


CC 


20 


EF 


CC 


A0 


00 


B9 


35 


00 


0F41:A9 


00 


85 


C6 


A5 


CB 


C9 


0D 


4E 


llBl 


57 2C 53 2C 57 50 


52 


4F A7 


0CD9: 


03 


20 


D2 


FF 


C8 


CC 


34 


03 


BA 


0F49:F0 


22 


A5 


C6 


F0 


FC 


A9 


00 


58 


11B9 


47 52 41 4D 00 55 


53 


45 52 


0CE1: 


00 


F4 


60 


A9 


IB 


85 


73 


A9 


C5 


0F51:85 


C6 


20 


F4 


CC 


20 


CF 


FF 


BD 


llCl 


:52 00 53 45 51 55 


45 


4E 84 


0CE9: 


GF 


85 


74 


4C 


F9 


CC 


A9 


23 


18 


0F59:AA 


20 


CF 


FF 


20 


16 


CC 


20 


El 


11C9 


,54 49 41 4C 00 81 


20 


46 El 


0CF1: 


85 


73 


A9 


CF 


85 


74 


4C 


F9 


6C 


0F61:EF 


CC 


20 


CF 


FF 


F0 


00 


20 


31 


llDl 


:49 4C 45 4E 41 4D 


45 


20 23 


0CF9: 


CC 


A9 


28 


85 


73 


A9 


CF 


85 


A7 


0F69:D2 


FF 


00 


F6 


A9 


01 


20 


C3 


CF 


11D9 


:3F 00 0D 0D IC 20 


4F 


55 63 


0D01: 


74 


4C 


F9 


CC 


A9 


33 


85 


73 


00 I 


0F71:FF 


4C 


CC 


FF 


20 


CF 


FF 


85 


02 


llEl 


:54 20 4F 46 20 4D 


45 


4D 92 


0D09: 


A9 


CF 


85 


74 


4C 


F9 


CC 


60 


28 


0F79:FB 


20 


CF 


FF 


05 


FB 


60 


20 


90 


11E9 


:4F 52 59 0D 00 20 


46 


49 9A 


0D11: 


A9 


4C 


85 


73 


A9 


CD 


85 


74 


FE 


0F81:E8 


CC 


20 


CF 


FF 


4C 


CF 


FF 


19 


llFl 


:4C 45 53 00 20 53 


2E 


44 E4 


0D19: 


20 


F9 


CC 


A5 


CB 


C9 


19 


F0 


5E 


0F89:24 


A9 


20 


4C 


02 


FF 


A9 


0D 


E3 


11F9 


:2E 41 2E 20 46 49 


4C 


45 80 


0D21: 


EE 


C9 


27 


F0 


EA 


20 


E4 


FF 


BA 


0F91:4C 


D2 


FF 


98 


AA 


A0 


00 


Bl 


9D 


1201 


:53 20 46 49 4E 49 


53 


48 BA 


0D29: 


4C 


81 


CA 


AC 


34 


03 


A2 


00 


E0 


0F99:73 


F0 


07 


C8 


20 


D2 


FF 


4C 


83 


1209 


:45 44 00 20 46 4F 


52 


20 17 


0D31: 


BO 


0F 


CF 


99 


3 5 


03 


C8 


8C 


55 


0FA1:FD 


CC 


8A 


A8 


60 


93 


96 


0D 


59 


1211 


:53 41 56 45 20 00 


9A 


20 A4 


0D39: 


34 


03 


E3 


E0 


04 


00 


Fl 


60 


01 


0FA9:0D 


20 


20 


20 


12 


20 


4E 


4F 


59 


1219 


:43 52 45 41 54 45 


20 


4D 75 


0D41: 


AC 


34 


03 


A2 


00 


BD 


17 


CF 


3E 


0FBl:41 


48 


53 


2E 


41 


52 


43 


20 


C9 


1221 


:4F 52 45 20 46 49 


4C 


45 61 


0D49: 


99 


35 


03 


C8 


8C 


34 


03 


E8 


8E 


0FB9:43 


4F 


50 


59 


52 


49 


47 


48 


7B 


1229 


i53 20 96 59 2F 4E 


20 


3F 99 


0D5I: 


E0 


04 


D0 


Fl 


60 


AC 


34 


03 


37 


0FC1:54 


20 


31 


39 


39 


31 


20 


43 


DO 


12 31 


:00 0D 20 4C 4F 41 


44 


49 B2 


0D59: 


A 2 


00 


BD 


13 


CF 


99 


35 


03 


FF 


0FC9:4F 


40 


50 


55 


54 


45 


20 


00 


3A 


1239 


;4E 47 20 00 0D 20 


53 


41 2B 


0D61' 


C8 


8C 


34 


03 


E8 


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_ 









JULY 1991 



COMPUTE G-29 




PROGRAMS 



Q U S 



V A K A L 1 S 



Mining for precious meta!s is a 
tough and dangerous occupa- 
tion that's part skill and part 
luck. Miner is an arcade-style 
game that requires some skill and a lot 
of luck. It can also be dangerous for 
your onscreen miner. 

The action is simple and straight- 
forward. Use a joystick plugged into 
port 2 to control your miner as he digs 
around the screen searching for gold 
nuggets. Each screen contains 40 nug- 
gets, and you must collect at least 20 
of them in a specified amount of time 
in order to advance to the next screen. 
That's the simple part. 

In addition to the gold, the earth 
your miner tunnels through contains a 
couple of deadly hazards — namely, 
pockets of methane gas and deposits 
of highly radioactive uranium. You 
want your miner to collect the gold 
and make it back to the surface with- 
out succumbing to these subterranean 
perils or running out of time. 

Miner is written entirely in ma- 
chine language, but it loads and runs 
like a BASIC program. Enter the pro- 
gram with MLX, our machine lan- 
guage entry program; see "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere in this section. When 
MLX prompts you, respond with the 
values given below. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: IBBO 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX, 

Starting the Game 

The game begins with one of your 
three miners standing in the doorway 
of a local bank. The bank is where you 
sell your gold for cash. You'll collect 
any gold nuggets that your miner un- 
covers, but you must deliver them to 
the bank before lime runs out, or 
you'll lose whatever he's found. 

Push the fire button to start the 
game and pull down on your joystick 
to have the miner dig straight down; 
push forward to move him up. Push 
left or right, and he'll dig in that direc- 
tion in search of gold. You'll have to 



maneuver him around boulders that 
you see scattered across the screen. 
Occasionally he'll uncover immov- 
able blocks of granite and have to 
make a detour around them. 



DIG FOR GOLD BUT 

WATCH OUT FOR 

DEADLY SURPRISES IN 

THIS ARCADE GAME 

FOR THE 64 



Deadly Perils 

There's more than gold and granite 
waiting for your miner to uncover. 
The two hazards, as mentioned earli- 
er, are methane gas and uranium de- 
posits. The number of hazards per 
screen is proportional to the skill level 
you've selected. Skill level 1 contains 
one or two uranium deposits and two 
to four methane pockets. Skill level 2 
has two to four uranium deposits and 
four to six methane pockets, and so 
on up to skill level 5. Methane pockets 
appear as blue bubbles, and uranium 
deposits appear as gray oblong balls, 
not to be confused with the gray boul- 
ders that litter the screen. 

When you first expose a hazard, 
you'll have about one second to get 
away from it before it becomes lethal. 
Once the grace period expires, the 
methane bubble will begin to move 
through the tunnel network that 
you've dug. Uranium deposits remain 
staiionar\^ at first, but they soon begin 
to flash and emit deadly radiation. 
This radiation slowly spreads 
throughout the tunnel system unless 
you can seal off tunnels with some of 
the boulders you've uncovered. Posi- 
tion your miner next to a boulder and 



push it in the desired direction. 

If the gas or radiation reaches a 
miner or if he's below ground when 
time runs out, you'll lose one miner. 
You can play with a longer time limit, 
but nothing is free. Gold nuggets are 
worth 100 points in the 150-second 
game, 75 points in the 200-second 
game, and 50 points in the 250-second 
game. Before you start a new game, 
you can buy more time by pressing 
the 1, 2, or 3 key to select either a 
1 50-, 200-, or 250-second game. 

Onscreen Info 

At the top of the screen, you'll see a 
readout of the number of miners you 
currently have, the number of gold 
nuggets that the active miner is carry- 
ing, the time remaining on the clock, 
and your score. Also displayed are the 
skill level and whether you're playing 
screen 1 or 2 of that level. You must 
complete two screens at each skill lev- 
el in order to advance to the next lev- 
el. You'll receive an additional miner 
for every 5000 points. 

Once you deposit some gold in 
the bank, a counter will appear in the 
bank itself displaying how much gold 
you've deposited. Once this coxmter 
reaches 20, you can advance to the 
next screen by pressing the fire button. 
You may continue to mine the pre- 
sent screen, but be sure to deposit any 
gold you have before pressing the fire 
button. 

Press the space bar to pause the 
game. When the border turns red, the 
game is paused. Press the space bar 
again to resume play. The Restore key 
resets the game to the title screen. 

Strategy 

Avoid digging laiige cavernous rooms, 
since the more surface area the radia- 
tion has, the more quickly it spreads. 
Try to protect the entrance to the 
bank, or you won't be able to deposit 
your gold Remember that the clock is 
just as deadly as the radiation or 
methane. Don't let time run out on 
you. 

After playing a few games, you 
may discover that some areas are 



G-30 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



usually free of radiation or methane 




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A5 


F7 


09 


00 


50 


0OF9 


:D0 


E5 


A9 


8C 


85 


03 


A9 


04 81 


0831:FB 85 01 A2 00 BD 00 


D8 


BA 


0A99 


D0 


BA 


A5 


F8 


C9 


07 


D0 


B4 


09 


0D01 


:85 


04 


20 


B9 


10 


A9 


00 


80 33 


0839:90 00 38 BD 00 D9 9D 


00 


90 


0AA1 


AD 


70 


18 


00 


03 


40 


lA 


0B 


41 


0D09 


:7E 


18 


AD 


78 


18 


F0 


03 


40 70 


0841:39 BD 00 DA 90 00 3A 


BD 


2A 


0AA9 


C9 


01 


00 


03 


40 


03 


0B 


C9 


7B 


0D11 


:59 


13 


A5 


03 


09 


80 


00 


0S Bl 


0849:00 DB 9D 00 3B BD 00 


DC 


Bl 


0AB1 


,02 


00 


03 


40 


EO 


0A 


09 


03 


46 


0D19 


:A5 


04 


09 


04 


00 


08 


AD 


81 04 


0851:9D 00 3C BD 00 DD 9D 


00 


46 


0AB9 


D0 


03 


4C 


05 


0A 


A9 


08 


8D 


72 


0021 


:18 


F0 


03 


20 


7A 


11 


20 


90 DB 


0859:3D BD 00 DE 9D 00 3E 


BD 


8C 


0AC1 


:74 


18 


A9 


0B 


80 


75 


18 


A9 


18 


0D29 


;10 


AD 


6E 


18 


00 


03 


40 


33 64 


0861:00 DF 9D 00 3F ES D0 


CD 


2A 


0AC9 


:0A 


8D 


72 


18 


A9 


0D 


8D 


73 


26 


0031 


:12 


A5 


05 


09 


30 


00 


03 


40 8A 


0869:A2 00 BD 4F 15 9D D8 


3A 


B2 


0AD1 


:18 


4C 


31 


0B 


A9 


06 


80 


74 


D0 


0039 


:1F 


10 


20 


9D 


10 


AD 


6F 


18 F2 


0871:E8 E0 A0 D0 F5 A5 01 


09 


A0 


0AD9 


:18 


A9 


09 


8D 


75 


18 


A9 


08 


C5 


0D41 


:4A 


90 


03 


40 


98 


0D 


4A 


90 E7 


0879:04 85 01 A9 FF 8D 7E 


18 


F2 


0AE1 


:8D 


72 


IS 


A9 


0B 


SO 


73 


18 


84 


0049 


:03 


40 


ES 


0D 


4A 


90 


03 


40 CO 


0881:A9 72 8D 14 03 A9 14 


8D 


6A 


0AE9 


:4C 


31 


0B 


A9 


04 


80 


74 


18 


03 


0051 


:38 


0E 


4A 


90 


03 


40 


88 


0E 05 


0889:15 03 58 A9 FF 8D 6D 


18 


B3 


0AF1 


:A9 


07 


80 


75 


18 


A9 


06 


80 


A6 


0059 


:A9 


00 


8D 


A5 


13 


80 


A 6 


18 B0 


0891:A9 41 8D 18 03 A9 15 


80 


70 


0AF9 


:72 


18 


A9 


09 


80 


73 


18 


40 


09 


0061 


:SD 


A7 


18 


80 


A8 


18 


A9 


FF 01 


0899:19 03 AD 18 D0 29 F0 


09 


44 


0B01 


:31 


0B 


A9 


02 


80 


74 


18 


A9 


DF 


0D69 


:8D 


AB 


18 


20 


34 


lA 


A9 


00 97 


08A1:0E 8D IS D0 A9 FF 8D 


7E 


13 


0B09 


105 


80 


75 


18 


A9 


04 


80 


72 


20 


0D71 


:8D 


AB 


18 


4C 


BB 


18 


20 


F6 7A 


08A9:18 8D 6D 18 A9 00 8D 


20 


E0 


0B11 


:18 


A9 


07 


8D 


73 


18 


40 


31 


ID 


0079 


;0E 


40 


0B 


00 


38 


A5 


03 


E9 28 


08B1:D0 A9 93 20 02 FF 18 


A2 


72 


0B19 


:0B 


A9 


01 


80 


74 


18 


A9 


03 


72 


0081 


:28 


85 


08 


A5 


04 


E9 


00 


85 lA 


08B9:03 A0 0D 20 F0 FF A2 


00 


E3 


0B21 


:80 


75 


18 


A9 


02 


8D 


72 


18 


30 


0D89 


:0C 


18 


A5 


0B 


69 


60 


85 


09 F5 


08C1:BD EF 15 20 02 FF E8 


E0 


9A 


0B29 


:A9 


05 


8D 


73 


18 


40 


31 


0B 


9D 


0091 


;A5 


00 


69 


3B 


85 


0A 


60 


A9 21 


0BC9:B8 D0 F5 18 A2 10 A0 


05 


46 


0B31 


:20 


EF 


13 


AD 


IB 


D4 


09 


23 


73 


0099 


:00 


80 


A6 


18 


8D 


A7 


18 


8D 36 


08D1:20 F0 FF A2 00 BD A7 


16 


B4 


0B39 


:90 


F9 


C9 


29 


B0 


F5 


80 


71 


OB 


0DA1 


:A8 


18 


20 


7D 


00 


A0 


00 


Bl 8E 


08D9:20 02 FF E8 E0 70 D0 


F5 


9D 


0B41 


:18 


20 


40 


10 


A0 


00 


Bl 


03 


DF 


0DA9 


:0B 


09 


50 


F0 


23 


09 


5E 


F0 44 


08E1:A9 07 8D EB DA A9 00 


8D 


04 


0B49 


:C9 


50 


00 


F5 


A9 


5E 


91 


03 


02 


0DB1 


:19 


09 


5F 


F0 


18 


09 


65 


90 09 


08E9:70 18 A9 EB 85 03 A9 


DA 


92 


0B51 


:18 


A5 


03 


85 


07 


A5 


04 


69 


D5 


0DB9 


:07 


09 


69 


B0 


0A 


40 


59 


13 49 


08F1:85 04 20 B9 10 20 9D 


10 


Bl 


0B59 


:D4 


85 


08 


A9 


00 


91 


07 


OE 


5A 


0001 


:09 


5D 


D0 


03 


20 


04 


10 


40 23 


08F9:AD 6E 18 F0 52 AD 6F 


18 


CE 


0B61 


:71 


18 


D0 


DD 


A0 


00 


A9 


50 


E3 


0DC9 


:67 


00 


40 


B9 


12 


40 


10 


11 0B 


0901:4A B0 F2 4A B0 EF 4A 


B0 


Fl 


0B69 


:99 


B2 


04 


99 


DA 


04 


99 


02 


2F 


0DD1 


:20 


03 


13 


40 


67 


0D 


18 


A5 50 


0909:06 4A B0 22 4C F6 08 


AD 


E4 


0B71 


:05 


A9 


09 


99 


B2 


08 


99 


DA 


36 


0DD9 


:03 


69 


28 


85 


0B 


A5 


04 


69 SO 


0911:70 18 F0 El A0 00 A9 


06 


FB 


0B7 9 


:D8 


99 


02 


D9 


C8 


C0 


05 


00 


64 


0DE1 


:00 


85 


00 


20 


8A 


00 


60 


A9 D3 


0919:91 03 CE 70 18 C6 03 


C6 


3E 


0BS1 


:E5 


A9 


69 


SO 


3B 


04 


A9 


6A 


A2 


0DE9 


:00 


80 


A5 


18 


8D 


A7 


18 


80 66 


0921:03 A9 07 91 03 20 57 


14 


74 


0B89 


:8D 


3C 


04 


A9 


6B 


80 


3D 


04 


A0 


0DF1 


:A8 


18 


20 


07 


00 


A0 


00 


Bl 84 


0929:20 F6 0E 4C F6 08 AD 


70 


33 


0B91 


:A9 


6C 


80 


63 


04 


A 9 


60 


SO 


AE 


0DF9 


:0B 


09 


50 


F0 


23 


09 


5E 


F0 94 


0931:18 C9 04 F0 C0 A0 00 


A9 


83 


0B99 


:64 


04 


A9 


6E 


80 


65 


04 


A9 


B2 


0E01 


:19 


C9 


5F 


F0 


18 


09 


65 


90 5A 


0939:06 91 03 EE 70 IS E6 


03 


B6 


0BA1 


:02 


80 


3B 


08 


8D 


30 


08 


80 


AD 


0E09 


:07 


09 


69 


B0 


0A 


40 


59 


13 9A 


0941:E6 03 A9 07 91 03 20 


57 


5D 


0BA9 


:3D 


D8 


80 


63 


D8 


8D 


64 


08 


IB 


0E11 


:C9 


5D 


00 


03 


20 


04 


10 


40 74 


0949:14 20 F6 0E 4C F6 08 


A9 


25 


0BB1 


:8D 


65 


OS 


AD 


IB 


04 


09 


19 


B6 


0E19 


:67 


0D 


40 


02 


12 


40 


10 


11 ED 


0951:93 20 D2 FF A9 33 8D 


9F 


64 


0BB9 


;90 


F9 


C9 


24 


B0 


F5 


8D 


71 


FB 


0E21 


:20 


D3 


13 


40 


67 


00 


38 


A5 EE 


0959:18 A9 01 8D AA 18 8D 


AD 


59 


0BC1 


:18 


20 


40 


10 


18 


A5 


03 


69 


BB 


0E29 


:03 


E9 


01 


35 


0B 


A5 


04 


E9 9A 


0961:18 A9 00 8D 8E 18 8D 


8F 


42 


0BC9 


;60 


85 


03 


A 5 


04 


69 


3B 


85 


ED 


0E31 


:00 


85 


0C 


20 


8A 


00 


60 


A9 25 


0969:18 8D 90 18 8D 96 18 


80 


03 


0BD1 


:04 


A0 


00 


Bl 


03 


00 


EA 


A9 


08 


0E39 


:00 


80 


A5 


18 


80 


A6 


18 


80 B3 


0971:97 18 8D 98 18 A9 FF 


80 


85 


0BD9 


:61 


91 


03 


CE 


71 


18 


D0 


El 


01 


0E41 


:A8 


18 


20 


27 


0E 


A0 


00 


Bl D2 


0979:7E 18 18 A2 00 A0 00 


20 


A0 


0BE1 


:A9 


FF 


8D 


A3 


18 


AD 


IB 


D4 


3B 


0E49 


:0B 


C9 


5C 


F0 


23 


09 


5F 


F0 E7 


0981:F0 FF A2 00 BD 17 17 


20 


F8 


0BE9 


:CD 


74 


18 


90 


F3 


CD 


75 


18 


E9 


0E51 


:10 


G9 


5E 


F0 


15 


09 


65 


90 F3 


0989:D2 FF E8 E0 59 00 F5 


AD 


D7 


0BF1 


:B0 


EE 


80 


71 


18 


20 


40 


10 


B6 


0S59 


:07 


09 


69 


B0 


0A 


40 


59 


13 EA 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE G-31 




PROGRAMS 



0E61 


:C9 


50 


D0 


03 


20 


D4 


10 


4C 


C4 


10C9:10 


F0 


ED 


60 


AS 


C5 


C9 


40 


0A 


I331:0D 20 BD 19 


AS 09 85 03 BE 


0E69 


:67 


0D 


4C 


EB 


12 


4C 


IC 


11 


CF 


10Dl;D0 


FA 


60 


A0 


00 


Bl 


09 


F0 


F8 


1339:A5 0A 85 04 


A9 5E 80 76 FD 


0E71 


:20 


D3 


13 


40 


67 


0D 


18 


A5 


FE 


10D9:0B 


C9 


63 


F0 


0C 


09 


64 


F0 


AE 


1341:18 20 07 0E 


20 F2 19 A9 FO 


0E79 


:03 


69 


01 


85 


0B 


A5 


04 


69 


4A 


10E1:10 


4C 


F7 


10 


A9 


5C 


4C 


F7 


6C 


1349:00 8D AS 18 


80 A6 18 8D CO 


0E81 


:00 


85 


0C 


20 


8A 


0D 


60 


A 9 


75 


10E9:10 


20 


6C 


12 


A9 


63 


4C 


F7 


34 


1351:A7 18 80 A8 


18 40 Dl 00 30 


0E89 


:00 


8D 


A5 


18 


8D 


A6 


IS 


8D 


04 


10F1:10 


20 


8B 


12 


A9 


64 


80 


83 


32 


1359:A9 FF 80 7E 


18 80 7E 18 F9 


, 0E91 


:A7 


18 


20 


77 


0E 


A0 


00 


Bl 


A7 


10F9:18 


20 


BD 


19 


A5 


08 


85 


03 


DE 


1361:20 BD 13 OE 


9F 13 AD 9F AE 


0E99 


:0B 


C9 


5C 


F0 


23 


C9 


5F 


F0 


38 


1101:A5 


0C 


85 


04 


AD 


83 


18 


80 


23 


1369:18 80 08 04 


09 30 F0 29 5A , 


0EA1 


:1C 


C9 


5E 


F0 


15 


C9 


65 


90 


44 


1109:76 


18 


20 


07 


0E 


20 


F2 


19 


DO 


1371:18 A2 0A A0 


0A 20 F0 FF 4A 


0EA9 


:07 


C9 


69 


B0 


0A 


4C 


59 


13 


3B 


1111:AD 


83 


18 


C9 


50 


00 


03 


40 


03 


1379:A2 00 BD 70 


17 20 02 FF 8E 


0EB1 


:C9 


5D 


D0 


03 


20 


D4 


10 


4C 


15 


1119:D3 


13 


60 


F8 


18 


AD 


81 


18 


18 


1381:E8 E0 16 00 


FS AO 9F 18 El 


0EB9 


:67 


0D 


4C 


04 


13 


4C 


IC 


11 


A9 


1121:69 


01 


8D 


81 


18 


08 


20 


20 


93 


1389:80 AD 05 20 


B9 10 20 9D 70 


0EC1 


:20 


D3 


13 


4C 


67 


0D 


A5 


03 


C7 


1129:11 


4C 


Dl 


0D 


A9 


20 


8D 


0B 


E5 


1391:10 AD 6E 18 


00 F8 4C 76 F3 


0EC9 


:85 


05 


A5 


04 


85 


06 


18 


A5 


F8 


1131:04 


8D 


0C 


04 


AD 


81 


18 


4A 


68 


1399:09 18 A2 0A 


A0 0A 20 F0 90 


0EDL 


:03 


69 


00 


85 


07 


A5 


04 


69 


62 


1139:4A 


4A 


4A 


F0 


10 


09 


30 


8D 


FD 


13A1:FF A2 00 BD 


86 17 20 02 EF 


0ED9 


:D4 


85 


08 


AD 


76 


18 


38 


E9 


0C 


1141: 0B 


04 


AD 


81 


18 


29 


0F 


09 


44 


13A9:FF E8 E0 15 


D0 FS 20 B9 CF 


0EE1 


:5C 


AA 


BD 


AE 


18 


8D 


77 


18 


77 


1149:30 


80 


0C 


04 


60 


AD 


81 


18 


70 


13B1:10 20 90 10 


AD 6E 18 00 C4 


0EE9 


:A0 


00 


AD 


77 


18 


91 


07 


AD 


46 


1151:29 


0F 


09 


30 


80 


0B 


04 


60 


F0 


13B9:F8 4C AS 08 


18 A2 08 A0 A0 


0EF1 


:76 


18 


91 


05 


60 


A2 


68 


A0 


00 


1159:AD 


82 


18 


F0 


IB 


4A 


4A 


4A 


S5 


1301:08 20 F0 FF 


A2 00 BD B4 57 


0EF9 


;FF 


88 


D0 


FD 


CA 


D0 


FB 


60 


IE 


1161;4A 


09 


30 


80 


63 


04 


AD 


82 


02 


1309:17 20 D2 FF 


E8 E0 B9 00 EC 


0F01 


:A9 


00 


8D 


Al 


18 


A9 


01 


8D 


B6 


1169:18 


29 


0F 


09 


30 


80 


64 


04 


08 


13D1;F5 60 A9 SC 


80 76 18 20 90 


0F09 


:A9 


18 


AC 


A9 


18 


B9 


00 


54 


2E 


1171:A9 


07 


80 


63 


08 


80 


64 


08 


B0 


13D9:C7 0E AS 0B 


8S 03 AS 0C 50 


0F11 


;85 


10 


C8 


B9 


00 


54 


F0 


3A 


18 


1179:60 


F8 


A0 


02 


18 


B9 


8E 


18 


IB 


13E1:8S 04 A9 62 


8D 76 18 20 80 


0F19 


85 


11 


A0 


00 


Bl 


10 


C9 


63 


17 


1181:79 


91 


18 


99 


8E 


18 


83 


10 


57 


13E9:C7 0E 20 21 


14 60 20 00 EF 


0F21 


D0 


11 


AC 


A9 


18 


88 


B9 


00 


72 


1189;F4 


A0 


02 


18 


89 


96 


18 


79 


El 


13F1: 14 A9 FF 8D 


0E D4 8D 0F 53 


0F29 


54 


C9 


3C 


90 


15 


A0 


00 


A9 


49 


1191:91 


18 


99 


96 


18 


88 


10 


F4 


17 


13F9;D4 A9 80 80 


12 04 60 A2 25 


0F31 


60 


91 


10 


18 


A5 


11 


69 


D4 


80 


1199:38 


AD 


81 


18 


E9 


01 


80 


81 


E4 


1401:00 8A 9D 00 


04 E8 E0 18 A3 


0F39 


85 


11 


A0 


00 


Bl 


10 


49 


0E 


E0 ! 


11A1:18 


18 


AD 


82 


18 


69 


01 


8D 


A9 


1409:00 F8 60 A9 


30 80 06 04 17 


0F41 


91 


10 


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97 


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87 


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1451:A9 80 80 04 


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4A 


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1459:14 A9 55 80 


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1461:14 20 00 14 


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67 


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14C1:A9 75 80 93 


18 A9 02 8D FF 


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5B 


1261:AA 


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1409:94 18 A9 00 


80 95 18 60 CA 


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4A 


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1269:4C 


76 


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1271:F0 


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1409:92 18' A9 50 


80 93 18 A9 20 


1011: 


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AA 


18 


29 


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1279:A5 


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99 


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88 


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14El:02 8D 94 18 


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1019: 


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15 


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88 


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8D 


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1029: 


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10 


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3C 


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C8 


C8 


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4C 


80 


12 


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A0 18 EE Al F4 


1031: 


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00 


3D 


20 


D0 


8D 


7E 


EF 


1299:0C 


99 


24 


54 


88 


AS 


08 


99 


7E 


1501:18 EE A2 18 


AD A0 18 09 82 


1039: 


18 


20 


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10 


4C 


3B 


0D 


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3F 


12A1:24 


54 


88 


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00 


99 


24 


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9B 


1509:78 00 08 A9 


FF SO AS 18 El 


1041: 


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ca 


B0 


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12A9:60 


A0 


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98 


99 


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54 


99 


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1511:40 31 EA AD 


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1049: 


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D4 


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3B 


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1281:24 


54 


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60 


02 


1519:90 06 20 01 


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1051: 


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26 


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A5 


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85 


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72 


1S21:AD A2 18 09 


30 90 06 20 BA 


1059: 


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12C1:0C 


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18 


2E 


1529:AB 0F 4C 31 


E A 40 31 EA DO 


1061: 


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7F 


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85 


03 


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12C9:AD 


A5 


18 


80 


A4 


18 


40 


10 


45 


1531:A2 00 FE 00 


54 FE 24 54 07 


1069: 


A9 


04 


69 


00 


85 


04 


60 


18 


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12D1:13 


18 


A5 


0B 


69 


28 


85 


09 


EA 


1539:E8 E8 E8 E0 


24 D0 F3 60 E9 


1071: 


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68 


6D 


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1541:48 AD 60 18 


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1079: 


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A6 


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80 


A 4 


18 


40 


4F 


1549:68 4C A5 08 


68 40 30 42 EE 


1081: 


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6D 


7F 


18 


8 5 


03 


A9 


06 


18 


12E9;1D 


13 


38 


A5 


0B 


E9 


01 


85 


4A 


1551:99 Al Al 99 


42 30 00 00 81 


1089: 


69 


00 


85 


04 


60 


18 


A9 


F8 


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12F1:09 


A5 


0C 


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30 


1559:00 00 00 00 


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1091: 


6D 


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06 


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D7 


12F9:A7 


18 


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A7 


18 


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A4 


18 


80 


1561:OA ED 7F 83 


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1099: 


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85 


04 


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A9 


FF 


8D 


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1301 :4C 


ID 


13 


18 


AS 


0B 


69 


01 


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1569:7A OF OD ED 


72 IC 00 18 7F 


10A1: 


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00 


DC 


29 


10 


D0 


04 


36 


1309:85 


09 


A5 


0C 


69 


00 


85 


0A 


0A 


1571:3C 6C 76 30 


38 00 00 30 65 


10A9: 


8D 


6E 


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60 


AD 


00 


DC 


29 


85 


1311:EE 


A8 


18 


AD 


A8 


18 


8D 


A4 


10 


1579:7E 7E 7E 7E 


30 00 CF E6 A2 


10BX: 


0F 


38 


E9 


0F 


8D 


6F 


18 


60 


50 


1319:18 


4C 


ID 


13 


A0 


00 


Bl 


09 


A4 


1581:23 80 7E 9F 


83 F9 18 18 7F 


10B9: 


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DC 


29 


10 


F0 


F9 


A 2 


B9 ' 


1321:C9 


5C 


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67 


00 


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1589:66 FF DB 30 


66 E7 00 30 35 


10C1: 


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29 


3F 


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18 


09 


03 


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67 


A2 


1S91:7E 7E 7E 7E 


30 00 38 44 E8 



G-32 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




D 



ROGRAMS 



1599:42 


82 


81 


41 62 


IC 


38 


44 02 


1801:1D ID 


ID ID Al 20 


20 20 6A 


1A69:A7 IB 4A B0 09 4A B0 21 80 


15A1: 


42 


82 


81 


41 62 


IC 


IC 


22 AF 


1809:20 20 


20 20 20 20 


20 20 39 


1A71:4A B0 39 4A B0 51 20 E3 Bl 


15A9: 


42 


41 


81 


82 46 


38 


08 


08 ca 


1811:20 20 


20 20 20 20 


20 20 41 


1A79:1A 20 23 IB 20 F3 lA 20 FD 


15B1: 


98 


92 


D2 


43 41 


01 


82 


82 F0 


1819:20 20 


20 Al ID ID 


ID ID 34 


1A81:23 IB 20 13 IB 20 23 IB FD 


15B9: 


C3 


49 


49 


18 10 


10 


00 


00 83 


1821:1D ID 


ID ID ID ID 


ID ID 51 


1A89:20 03 IB 20 23 IB 40 48 5A 


15C1: 


00 


36 


7F 


FF 00 


FF 


00 


00 69 


1829:1D ID 


ID ID Al 20 


20 20 92 


1A91:18 20 F3 lA 20 23 18 20 5F 


15C9; 


00 


DB 


PF 


FF 00 


FF 


00 


70 5B 


1831:20 20 


20 20 20 20 


20 20 61 


1A99:03 18 20 23 IB 20 E3 lA 87 


15D1: 


70 


74 


FE 


FF 00 


FF 


93 


93 EB 


1839:20 20 


20 20 20 20 


20 20 69 


1AA1:20 23 18 20 13 IB 20 23 7C 


15D9; 


FF 


93 


93 


FF FF 


FF 


00 


7E D9 


1841:20 20 


20 Al ID ID 


ID ID 5C 


1AA9:1B 4C 48 IB 20 03 IB 20 90 


15E1: 


3E 


7E 


7A 


7A 3E 


7E 


C9 


C9 08 


1349:1D ID 


ID ID ID ID 


ID ID 79 


1AB1:23 IB 20 13 IB 20 23 18 2E 


15E9: 


FF 


C9 


C9 


FF FF 


FF 


9£ 


20 ID 


1851:1D ID 


ID ID Al Al 


Al Al 45 


1A89:20 F3 lA 20 23 IB 20 E3 E9 


15FX: 


20 


20 


20 


20 CD 


C9 


CE 


C5 33 


1859:A1 Al 


Al Al Al Al 


Al Al 89 


1AC1:1A 20 23 IB 4C 48 18 20 FA 


i5F9; 


D2 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 7D 


1861:A1 Al 


Al Al Al Al 


Al Al 91 


1AC9:13 IB 20 23 IB 20 E3 lA BF 


1601: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 2D 


1869:A1 Al 


Al Al 00 00 


00 00 21 


1ADI:20 23 IB 20 03 IB 20 23 20 


1609: 


20 


20 


11 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 53 


1371:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


00 00 Al 


1AD9:1B 20 F3 lA 20 23 18 40 D3 


1611: 


20 


20 


20 


20 IF 


C4 


45 


53 45 


1879:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


00 00 A9 


1AE1:48 IB A9 FF 8D 7B 18 A9 6A 


1619; 


49 


47 


4E 


45 44 


20 


42 


59 5A 


1881:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


00 00 Bl 


1AE9:FF SD 70 18 A9 01 8D 7D 70 


1621: 


20 


C7 


55 


53 20 


D6 


41 


4B 59 ' 


1389:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


00 00 B9 


1AF1:18 60 A9 28 8D 7B 18 A9 36 : 


1629: 


41 


AC 


49 


53 2E 


20 


20 


20 B9 


1891:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


00 00 CI 


1AF9:00 8D 70 18 A9 02 8D 7D 90 


1631: 


20 


20 


20 


20 11 


20 


20 


20 E4 


1899:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


00 00 C9 


1B01:13 60 A9 01 8D 78 18 A9 D4 


1639: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 6 5 


I8A1:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


00 00 Dl 


1B09:00 8D 70 18 A9 04 8D 7D A9 


1641: 


20 


C3 


4F 


50 59 


52 


49 


47 4B 


18A9:00 00 


00 00 00 00 


09 0C F7 


1B11:18 60 A9 D8 8D 7B 18 A9 62 


1549: 


48 


54 


20 


DB 20 


31 


39 


39 El 


18B1:07 0F 


03 0E 0F 0E 


0E 0E 4 5 


1B19:FF SD 70 18 A9 08 8D 7D 09 


1651: 


31 


2E 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 89 


1839:07 07 


AD A8 IB D0 


03 40 DD 


1821:18 60 18 A5 0D 6D 78 18 06 


1659: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


11 


20 


03 EC 


18C1:77 0D 


A9 00 8D A8 


IB 8D F8 


1829:85 08 A5 0E 6D 70 18 85 8D 


1661: 


CF 


CD 


D0 


D5 D4 


C5 


20 


D0 2F 


18C9:A0 18 


20 A7 19 20 


7A 19 26 


1831:00 A0 00 Bl 08 09 5C F0 D9 


1669: 


55 


42 


4C 


49 43 


41 


54 


49 FF 


1801:20 71 


19 A0 00 Bl 


12 C9 50 


1B39:24 09 62 F0 57 60 AC AA 8F 


1671; 


4F 


4E 


53 


20 C9 


4e: 


54 


4 5 BA 


18D9:60 F0 


IC C9 67 F0 


18 20 E5 


1B41:1B AD 7D 18 99 48 54 EE 27 


1679: 


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4E 


41 


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4F 


4E 


41 35 


18E1:99 19 


A5 12 C9 BF 


D0 E8 D5 


1B49:A9 IB EE A9 IB EE A9 IB 96 


1681: 


4C 


20 


CC 


54 44 


2E 


11 


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18E9:A5 13 


C9 07 D0 E5 


20 7A 34 


1B51:AD A9 IB 09 25 F0 03 40 08 


1689: 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 B5 


18F1:19 20 


B2 19 4C 0B 


0D 20 67 


1B59:3C lA 4C F2 19 68 68 A5 CD 


1691: 


20 


20 


CI 


4C 4C 


20 


52 


49 A3 


18F9:39 19 


20 13 19 20 


47 19 33 


1B61:0D 85 03 A5 0E 85 04 A9 72 


1699: 


47 


48 


54 


53 20 


52 


45 


53 63 


1901:20 13 


19 20 55 19 


20 13 8F 


1869; 5C 8D 76 18 20 07 0E A5 63 


16A1; 


45 


52 


56 


4 5 44 


2E 


9F 


D0 0F 


1909:19 20 


63 19 20 13 


19 40 99 


1871: 0B 85 0D A5 00 85 0E AC 09 


16A9: 


4C 


55 


47 


20 41 


20 


4A 


4F AA 


1911:E0 18 


A0 00 Bl 08 


09 50 77 


1B79;A9 IB A5 0D 99 24 54 85 50 


16B1 


59 


53 


54 


49 43 


4B 


20 


49 4F 


1919:F0 05^9 62 F0 12 


60 A5 9A 


1B81;03 C8 A5 0E 99 24 54 85 80 


16B9- 


4E 


54 


4F 


20 50 


4F 


52 


54 C6 


1921:0B 85 


03 A5 0C 85 


04 A9 ID 


1889:04 A9 65 8D 76 18 20 07 CD 


16C1 


20 


54 


57 


4F 2E 


20 


20 


20 4 5 


1929:68 8D 


76 18 20 C7 


0E 60 DF 


1B91:0E 40 3F IB 68 68 A9 FF 83 


16C9 


20 


20 


11 


20 20 


20 


20 


IF 13 


1931:68 68 


20 20 19 4C 


59 13 77 


1B99;8D 78 18 8D 7E 18 20 F2 18 


16D1 


D3 


45 


4C 


45 43 


54 


20 


41 04 


1939:38 A5 


12 E9 28 85 


0B A5 E4 


1BA1:19 68 68 4C 59 13 00 00 67 


16D9 


20 


53 


4B 


49 4C 


4C 


20 


4C 09 


1941:13 E9 


00 85 0C 60 


18 A5 87 


1BA9;00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 DF 


16E1 


45 


56 


45 


4C 3A 


20 


20 


31 77 


1949:12 69 


28 85 08 A5 


13 69 BA 


EH 


16E9 


20 


32 


20 


33 20 


34 


20 


35 31 


1951:00 85 


0C 60 38 A5 


12 E9 D2 






16F1 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 IE 


1959:01 85 


0B A5 13 E9 


00 85 EE 






16F9 


20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


11 


9F 87 


1961:0C 60 


18 A5 12 69 


01 85 CC 




ONLY 


1701 


.D0 


52 


45 


53 53 


20 


IC 


46 A3 


1969:0B A5 


13 69 00 85 


00 60 12 




1709 


:49 


52 


45 


20 9F 


54 


4F 


20 28 


1971:A9 Al 


85 12 A9 04 


85 13 2E 




ON 


1711 


:42 


45 


47 


49 4E 


2E 


IF 


CD 66 


1979:60 20 


71 19 A0 00 


Bl 12 IE 




1719 


:49 


4E 


45 


52 53 


3A 


20 


9A AB 


1981:C9 68 


D0 04 A9 67 


91 12 2D 




DISK 


1721 


:20 


05 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 88 


1989:20 99 


19 A5 12 C9 


8F D0 B7 




1729 


:20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 57 


1991:EB A5 


13 C9 07 D0 


E5 60 C9 






1731 


:20 


20 


20 


IF D3 


43 


4F 


52 0A 


1999:18 A5 


12 69 01 85 


12 A5 02 




When you buy Gazette Disk ($9.95 plus 


1739 
1741 
1749 


:45 
:20 
;4C 


3A 
20 
3A 


05 
20 
20 


20 20 
IF CC 
05 20 


20 
45 
20 


20 
56 
20 


20 ID 
45 EA 
20 62 


19A1:13 69 
19A9:8D 84 
19B1:60 AD 


00 85 13 60 
18 A5 04 8D 

84 18 85 03 


A5 03 78 
85 18 9A 
AD 85 AA 




$2.00 shipping and handling), you not 
only get all the type-in programs found 


1751 


:20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 7F 


19B9:18 85 


04 60 A5 03 


8D 34 B8 




in that month's magazine, you also get 


1759 


:20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


IF 86 


19C1:18 A5 


04 8D 85 18 


A5 05 9F 




"Gazette Gallery," bonus programs, 


1761 


:D3 


43 


52 


45 45 


4E 


3A 


05 C5 


19C9;8D 86 


18 A5 06 8D 


87 18 4F 




and more. To order, write to Gazette 


1769 


:20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


9A 12 


19D1:A5 07 


8D 88 18 A5 


08 8D 07 




Disk, COMPUTE Publications, 324 West 


1771 


:20 


CD 


49 


4E 45 


52 


53 


20 6B 


19D9:89 18 


A5 0B 8D 8A 


18 A5 A8 




Wendover Avenue, Suite 200. Greens- 


1779 


:52 


45 


4D 


41 49 


4E 


49 


4E 44 


19E1:0C 8D 


88 18 AD 76 


18 8D 75 




boro, North Carolina 27408. Here's a 


1781 
1789 


:47 
:20 


3A 
CI 


20 
20 


05 30 
CD 20 


IC 
C5 


20 
20 


C7 30 
20 91 


19E9:8C 18 
19F1:60 AD 


AD 77 18 8D 
84 18 85 03 


8D 18 8F 
AD 85 EA 




description of this month's bonus. 


1791 


:20 


20 


CF 


20 D6 


20 


C5 


20 B6 


19F9:18 85 


04 AD 86 18 


85 05 99 




Sectof Patrol 


1799 


:D2 


20 


20 


9A D0 


52 


45 


53 94 


1A01:AD 87 


18 85 06 AD 


88 18 59 




17A1 


:53 


20 


IC 


46 49 


52 


45 


20 A7 


1A09:85 07 


AD 89 18 85 


08 AD A4 




Grant Young 


17A9 


:9A 


54 


4F 


20 42 


45 


47 


49 25 


1A11:8A 18 


85 0B AD 88 


18 85 43 




BattJe Thraxion space fighters in this 


17B1 


:4E 


2E 


20 


9F Al 


Al 


Al 


Al 09 


1A19:0C AD 


8C IS 8D 76 


18 AD F5 




fast-paced arcade game in a race to 


17B9 
17C1 
17C9 


:A1 
:A1 
:Al 


Al 
Al 
Al 


Al 
Al 
Al 


Al Al 
Al Al 
Al ID 


Al 
Al 
ID 


Al 
Al 
ID 


Al E7 
Al EF 
ID 34 


1A21:8D 18 
1A29:A9 01 
1A31:D0 F8 


8D 77 18 60 
9D 48 54 E8 
60 20 BD 19 


A2 00 D2 
E0 12 C4 
A9 01 00 




coliect four quarters of a magic crystal 
of unlimited power. For each fighter you 


17D1 


: ID 


ID 


ID 


ID ID 


ID 


ID 


ID FF 


1A39:8D A9 


IB AC A9 IB 


B9 24 IE 




destroy, you'll collect one bomb to be 


17D9 


:1D 


ID 


ID 


ID Al 


20 


20 


20 41 


1A41:54 85 


0D C8 B9 24 


54 85 8B 




used against the renegade unit patrol- 


17E1 


:20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 10 


1A49:0E D0 


03 4C F2 19 


AD A9 DE 




ling that sector. Destroy a unit and tete- 


17E9 


:20 


20 


20 


20 20 


20 


20 


20 18 


1A51:1B 4A 


8D AA IB A8 


B9 48 39 




port to a new sector. 


17F1 


:20 


20 


20 


Al ID 


ID 


ID 


ID 0B 


1A59:54 8D 


A7 IB A0 00 


Bl 0D 37 






17F9 


:1D 


ID 


ID 


ID ID 


ID 


ID 


ID 28 


1A61:C9 64 


D0 03 40 48 


IB AD 4 5 















JULY 1991 



COMPUTE G-33 




D 



ROGRAMS 



BRYAN 



C H R 



S T 



you and your allies have been ac- 
cused of murdering the king of 
Acacia. Due to uncertainty about 
your guilt among the High Coun- 
cil judges, you and your party have 
been locked in a maze filled with mag- 
ical doors and powerful demons. Leg- 
end has it that the gods of the 
underworld will determine who is 
guihy and who is not. 

Here is where you will be tested. 
Those who are untruthful have their 
fates sealed from the beginning. It 
will only be a matter of time before 
it's apparent who among your party 
is innocent and who is guilty. Those 
who escape the dungeon trials alive 
will be excused of all charges, and 
their names will be cleared. 

Typing It In 

Dungeon Trials is written entirely in 
BASIC To avoid typing errors, enter 
the program with The Automatic 
Proofreader: see "Typing Aids" else- 
where in this section. Be sure to save 
a copy of the program when you've 
finished typing it in. 

Enter the Dungeon 

Plug a joystick into port 2 to play 
Dungeon Trials. Load and run the 
program; then wait for a minute while 
the computer reads the sprite data. 
When the main screen appears, you'll 
see what your party sees. 

There are doors on all sides of 
each room. These doors match a com- 
pass rose in that north is straight 
ahead, east is to the right, and west is 
to the left. South is always behind you 
and can't be seen. Above the room are 
the six members of your party. 

As you search for the exit, a vari- 
ety of evil foes will appear, blocking 
your path. You can't leave a room un- 
til you've defeated each demon in 
combat. Even after one of your party 
has defeated a foe, another one may 
appear immediately. 

When you select Fight from the 
menu, you'll be asked which of the six 
members of your party will engage the 
monster. Enter that member*s num- 
ber and press Return. At this point the 



background screen will clear, and a 
crosshairs pointer will appear. Try to 
maneuver the crosshairs over the 
head of the demon, and press the fire 
button before the demon can move 
away. The head is the only vital spot, 
and your timing is very important. 



DEFEAT THE 

POWERFUL DEMONS 

THAT BLOCK YOUR 

WAY TO SAFETY IN 

THIS ADVENTURE 

GAME FOR THE 64 



The snake is the exception. You 
must aim just over its head and strike 
the lower part of its tail. If your blow 
strikes it there, the snake will be ban- 
ished to its realm. 

You get only one chance to defeat 
a demon. If you miss, your party 
member dies. The maze has 1 50 
rooms; the object is to reach the last 
one. There are Ciyq magical doors that 
will teleport you to other parts of the 
dungeon, but you won't be able to re- 
turn to the teleport by retracing your 
steps. 

Good luck — I hope you have 
been truthful. 

DUNGEON TRIALS 

XG 100 LVL=1:RM=5 

AP llfl MF=12;TSF=63 

PF 120 FOR T=1T06 

MM 130 CH (T) =0 

KE 140 NEXTT 

CM 150 PRINTCHR$(147) ; 



FJ 


160 


P0KE53 28 1,0: POKE 53 280,1 

1 

PRINTTAB(12) ;"{YEL}READ 


BG 


170 






ING DATA...*' 


PX 


180 


FORCA-12672T012734;READ 
QA:pokeca,qa:next 


KM 


190 


FO RGB" 127 36TO 12796: READ 
QB:pokecb,qb:next 


SF 


200 


FORCC^12800TO12862:READ 
QC:POKECC,QC:NEXT 


HE 


210 


F0RCD=12864T012926:READ 
QD:pokecd,qd:next 


XM 


220 


FORCE=129 2BTO12990:READ 
QE:POKECE,QE:NEXT 


AQ 


230 


FORCF=12992TD13054:READ 
QF:POKECF,QF:NEXT 


MM 


240 


FORDA=12288TO12350:READ 
2A:pokeda,2A:next 


FJ 


250 


F0RDB-12 3 52T012414:READ 
ZB:P0KEDB,ZB:NEXT 


DD 


260 


FORDC=12416T012478;READ 
ZC:POKEDC,ZC:NEXT 


JF 


270 


FORDD-124 8 0TO12542:READ 
ZD;POKEDD,ZD;NEXT 


KP 


280 


FORDE=12544TO12606 : READ 
ZE:POKEDE,ZE:NEXT 


CC 


290 


FORDF»12608TO1267 0:READ 
ZF:P0KEDF,2F:NEXT 


PD 


300 


PRINTCHR$(147) ; 


GB 


310 


V=53248 


HA 


320 


P0KEV+23,TSF 


ES 


330 


P0KEV+28,TSF:P0KEV+37,7 
:POKEV+38,10 


KE 


340 


POKEV+0 , 50 : POKEV+1 , 58 


HC 


350 


POKEV+2 , 80 ; POKEV+ 3,58 


HJ 


360 


POKEV+4 ,110: POKEV+ 5,58 


DH 


370 


POKEV+6, 140:POKEV+7,5S 


SX 


380 


POKEV+8 , 170 : POKEV+9 , 58 


CH 


390 


POKEV+10 , 200 : POKEV+11 , 5 

8 

POKE204 0,198:POKE2041,1 


SP 


400 






99 


QQ 


410 


POKE204 2,200:POKE204 3,2 

01 


HG 


420 


POKE204 4,202:POKE204 5,2 
03 


CM 


430 


P0KEV+21,TSF 


JQ 


440 


POKEV+39 , 5 : POKEV+40 , 6 


KG 


450 


P0KEV+41,8:P0KEV-»-42,4 


FS 


460 


POKEV+4 3,6: POKEV+4 4 , 5 


GG 


470 


PR1NTCHR$(19) ; 


JC 


480 


P0KE214,6:PRINT 


BE 


490 


PRINT"{WHT}{4 SPACES }1 
{3 SPACES} 2 (3 SPACES} 3 
{2 SPACES}4{3 SPACES} 5 
{3 SPACES} 6" 


AJ 


500 


PRINT''{2 SPACES) {RVS} 

{WHT}{24 SPACES}" 


JX 


510 


F0RT=1T08 


HM 


520 


PRINT" (2 SPACES} {RVS} 
{WHT} ";TAB(25) ;"{RVS} 
{WHT} " 


AC 


530 


NEXT 


BH 


540 


PRINT" {2 SPACES} {RVS} 
{WHT} f 24 SPACES}" 


FP 


550 


PRINTCHR$(19); 


DE 


560 


POKE214,8:PRINT 


BC 


570 


F0RT=IT08 


PF 


580 


PRINT- (3 RIGHT} (RVS) 



0^34 C O 



M P 
V 



U T E 



JULY 1991 




PROGRAMS 





{BLa){22 SPACES} {WHT}" 


RJ 


1000 


POKE214,7;PRINT 


KA 1590 


POKE1024+(PY*40)+PX,32 


JH 590 


NEXT 


CB 


1010 


PRINTTAB(29) ;"{WHT} 


HJ 1600 


PX=PX+WX 


QK 600 


PRINTCHR$(19) ; 






{OFF}OPTIONS" 


XR 1610 


PY=PY+WY 


MP 610 


P0KE214,8:PRINT 


PX 


1020 


PRINTTAB(29) ;"{WHT} 


XJ 1620 


POKEPC+(PY*40)+PX,3 


SM 620 


PRINTTAB(ll) ;"{RVS}i5> 






{0FF}i7 T>" 


KE 1630 


POKEl024+(Py*40)+PX,91 




iB><R>iE><R><E><R>" 


RD 


1030 


PRINTTAB(29) j"{WHT} 




:WX=0:WY=0 


KC 630 


PRINTTAB(ll) ;"{RVS}i5} 






{RVS}F{0FF}IGHT" 


CF 1640 


POKEV+12,MY:POKEV+13,l 




:R><E>{OFFl£i*HRVS} 


OX 


1040 


PRINTTAB(29) ;"{WHT} 




40 




<R><E>" 






{RVS}N{OFF}ORTH" 


XM 1650 


GOTO 1450 1 


CR 640 


PRINTTAB(ll) ;"{RVS}i5> 


KD 


1050 


PRINTTAB{29) ;"{WHT} 


CB 1660 


SWX=1664 




iE><R}{0FF}{2 SPACES} 






{RVS}S{OFF}OUTH" 


KS 1670 


FX=SWX+PX 




{RVSKE>iR>" 


GA 


1060 


PRINTTAB{29) ;"{WHT} 


SE 1680 


FOR FY^FX TO (1024+40* 


JS 650 


PRINTTAB(ll) ;"{RVS}i5> 






{RVS}E{OFF}AST" 




PY+PX) STEP-40 




{RHE>{0FF}{2 SPACES} 


PB 


1070 


PRINTTAS(29) ;"{WHT} 


AC 1690 


POKEPC+(FY-1024) ,WC 




{RVS}<R>{E>" 






{RVS}W{OFF}EST" 


MJ 1700 


POKEFY,CW 


MX 660 


PRINTTAB(IL) ;"tRVS}<5> 


CK 


1080 


GETKY$:IFKY$=""THEN1080 


SJ 1710 


FORGJ=1TO10:NEXTGJ 




iEHR>C0FF}{2 SPACES} 


BJ 


1090 


IF MC$^"{5 SPACES} NONE 


DE 1720 


P0KEFY,32:NEXTFY 




{RVS}<E>iR>" 






" THEN 1120 


BB 1730 


IF MDR=1 THEN MY-MY+8 


RX 670 


PRIHTTAB (10) ;"{BLO}£ 


PS 


1100 


IF KY$=^"F"THEN 1170 


HR 1740 


IF MDR=2 THEN HY=MY-8 




{6 SPACES}i*>" 


JG 


1110 


GOTO1080 


SG 1750 


HM=INT(HY/8) 


GR 680 


PRINTTABt9) ;"{BLU}(0FF} 


BH 


1120 


IF Ky$="S"THEN2040 


JH 1760 


IF PY=11 THEN 1790 




£{8 SPACES}<*^" 


PQ 


1130 


IF KV$="N"THEN2200 


AF 1770 


IF PY-12 THEN 1790 


SM 690 


PRINTTAB(8);"{BLU}{0FF} 


AD 


1140 


IF KY$="E"THEN2350 


BJ 1780 


GOTO 1890 




£{10 SPACES}<*>" 


KG 


1150 


IF KY$="W"THEN2490 


SF 1790 


IF PX+1=HM THEN 1820 


JD 700 


PRINTCHR$(19) ? 


KM 


1160 


GOTO 1080 


KF 1800 


IF PX+2=HM THEN 1820 


SS 710 


POKE214,10:PRINT 


FG 


1170 


PRINT CHR$(19) ? 


MP 1810 


GOTO 1890 


DP 720 


PRINTTAB(8);"{BLU}{0FF} 


ED 


1180 


POKE214,ia:PRINT 


BG 1820 


FORGJ^1TO10:FORT=0TO15 




£";TAB[19) ;"{BLU}(OFF} 


DA 


1190 


PRINTTAB(2) ;"{WHT}CHAR 


XR 1830 


POKE V+45,T 




<*>" 






ACTER TO" 


XC 18 4 


NEXTT:NEXTGJ 


AG 730 


PRINTTAB(7) ;"{BLU} {OFF] 


PG 


1200 


INPUT" {2 SPACES}FIGHT 


MD 1850 


P0KEV+2X,TSF 




£ ";TAB(19) ;"{BLU} 






{SPACE}WITH";C 


FE 1860 


POKE53275,0 




Toff} i*y" 


FC 


1210 


IF C>6 THEN 1250 


QX 1870 


PRINTCHR$(147} ', 


DJ 740 


FORT=1T02 


EX 


1220 


IF C<1 THEN 1250 


PH 1880 


GOTO 470 


GD 750 


PRINTTAB(7) ;"{OFF} 


SQ 


1230 


IF CH (C)=255 THEN 1250 


QA 1890 


IF C=l THEN VP=39:TSF= 




{2 SPACES}" ;TAB (19) ;" 


BX 


1240 


GOTO 1320 




TSF-1 




{OFF} {2 SPACES}" 


SJ 


1250 


PRINTTAB(2) ;"THAT CHAR 


BH 1900 


IF C=2 THEN VP=40:TSF= 


FP 760 


NEXTT 






ACTER DOES NOT EXIST!" 




TSF"2 


RR 770 


PRINTTAB(7) ;"{BLa}{OFF} 
<2 P>";TAB(19) ;"{BLU} 


XM 


1260 


PRINTTAB(2) ;"CHOOSE AG 
AIN." 


BB 1910 


IF C-3 THEN VP=41:TSF- 

TSF-4 




{0FF}{2 P>" 


FG 


1270 


FORO^1TO1000 : NEXTO 


KJ 1920 


IF C=4 THEN VP=^42:TSF== 


CF 780 


PRINTTAB(7) ;"{OFF} 


AK 


1280 


PRINTCHR$(19) ; 




TSF-8 




{2 SPACES }";TAB( 19);" 


KP 


1290 


P0KE214,18iPRINT 


FA 1930 


IF C=5 THEN VP=43:TSF- 




{OFF} {2 SPACES}" 


GA 


1300 


F0R0=1T04; PRINT" 




TSF-16 


BX 790 


DM = INT(RND(0)*MF)-H 






{34 SPACES }":NEXTO 


BB 1940 


IF C=6 THEN VP=44:TSF= 


KK 800 


IF DH>6 THEN MC$=" 


SF 


1310 


GOTO 1170 




TSF-32 




{5 SPACES} NONE" 


JX 


1320 


PRINTCHR$(19) ; 


XS 1950 


CH (C)=255 


DB 810 


IFDM-1THENSM=I9 2:MNC=12 


KC 


1330 


POKE214,8:PRINT 


XX 1960 


FORGJ=1TO10:FORT=0TO15 




:MC$="{4 SPACES} SHADOW" 


RJ 


1340 


F0RT=1T08:PRINTTAB(3) ; 


HH X970 


POKE V+VP,T 


PF 820 


IFDM-2THENSM=193:MNC=1: 






"{22 spaces}":nextt 


FP 1980 


NEXTT iNEXTGJ 




MC$="{4 SPACES}GHOST" 


QE 


1350 


PL=1024:PC=55296 


AR 1990 


POKE53275,0 


HD 830 


IFDH=^3THENSM = 194:MNC = 5: 


QQ 


1360 


MY=124 


CM 2000 


P0KEV+21,TSF 




MC$="{3 SPACES} SERPENT" 


DJ 


1370 


PX=l4:py=13 


AF 2010 


IF TSF=0 THEN 2810 


PF 840 


IFDM^4THENSM=195:MNC=6: 


DJ 


1380 


IF C=l THEN CW=30:WC=9 


FH 2020 


PRINTCHR$(147} ? 




MC$="WINGEO WARRIOR" 


EH 


1390 


IF C = 2 THEN CW=66:WC=^6 


CJ 2030 


GOTO 300 


XM 850 


IFDM-5THENSM=196:MNC=I: 


DK 


1400 


IF C=3 THEN CW=30:WC^9 


SP 2040 


IF RM^l THEN 2640 




MC$="{3 SPACES} SKELETON 


PX 


1410 


IF C^4 THEN CW=42:WC=4 


PJ 2050 


IF RM=4 THEN 2640 




It 


BF 


1420 


IF C=5 THEN CW=43:WC=7 


AS 2060 


IF RM-5 THEN 2640 


SA 860 


IFDM=6THENSM^197:MNC=2: 


GF 


1430 


IF C^6 THEN CW=30;WC=9 


EX 2070 


IF RM=10 THEN 2640 




MC$=" VAPOR DEMON" 


DJ 


1440 


POKE53275,255 


QS 2080 


IF RM^ll THEN 2640 


BX 870 


PRINTCHR$(19) ; 


DD 


1450 


MDR=^INT(RND(0)*2)+1 


EQ 2090 


IF RM=12 THEN 2640 


HX 880 


PRINT 


PH 


1460 


IF MDR-1ANDMY^4<50THEN 


FD 2100 


IF RM=15 THEN 2640 


CP 890 


PRINTTAB{31) ;"{WHT} 






MDR^2 


AB 2110 


IF RM=17 THEN 2640 




{OFF} FOE" 


MJ 


1470 


IF MDR=2AKDMY+4>192THE 


JA 2120 


IF RM=18 THEN 2640 


MD 900 


PRINTTAB(31);"{WHT} 






N MDR=1 


JQ 2130 


IF RM=20 THEN 2640 




{0FF}<3 U>":PRINT 


KR 


148 


IF MDR=1 THEN My-MY-8 


RB 2140 


IF RM=23 THEN 2640 


DM 910 


PRINTTAS{26) ?"{WHT}";TA 


PQ 


1490 


IF MDR=2 THEN MY=MY+8 


FH 2150 


IF RM=24 THEN 2640 




B{26) ;MC$ 


RM 


1500 


JY'=PSEK(56320) 


RG 2160 


IF RM=25 THEN 2640 


CX 920 


IF DM>6THEN990 


GO 


1510 


IF JY=127 THEN1620 


XP 2170 


IF RM=28 THEN 2640 


HM 930 


POKEV+23 ,TSF+64 : POKEV+2 


KD 


1520 


IF JY='119 THEN WX=1 


AS 2180 


IF RM=29 THEN 2760 




8,TSF+64 


RQ 


1530 


IF JY=123 THEN WX="1 


FP 2190 


RM=RM+1: GOTO 300 


XB 940 


POKEV+37,7:POKEV+38,10 


AD 


1540 


IF JY=125 THEN WY=1 


FB 2200 


IF RM=1 THEN 2640 


MA 950 


POKEV+12 , 124 : POKEV+13 , 1 


RK 


1550 


IF JY-126 THEN WY=-1 


SG 2210 


IF RM=5 THEN 2640 




40 


AG 


1560 


IF JY=111 THEN 1660 


BE 2220 


IF RM=6 THEN 2640 


BG 960 


POKE2046,SM 


XQ 


1570 


IFPEEK(1024+PY*4 0+(PX+ 


CF 2230 


IF RM=li THEN 2640 


FP 970 


POKEV+21,TSF+64 






WX))=160THENWX=0 


ME 2240 


IF RM=12 THEN 2640 


PA 980 


POKEV+4 5,MNC 


QP 


1580 


IFPEEK (1024+ (PY+WY) *40 


CM 2250 


IF RH=13 THEN 2640 


DH 990 


PRINTCHR$(19) ; 






+PX)-160THEN WY=0 


EX 2260 


IF RM^16 THEN 2640 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE Q-35 




D 



ROGRAMS 



. DR 2270 IF RM^IS THEN 2640 


CJ 


2860 


IF KY$<>*'Y"THENSYS6473 






EFT"" 


9Q 2280 IF RM=19 THEN 2640 






8 


GA 


3280 


DATA0, 0,0, 0,42, 0,0, 168 


MJ 2290 IF RM=2i THEN 2640 


BM 


2870 


IF Ky$^"y"THEN RESTORE 






,128 


JX 2300 IF RM^24 THEN 2640 






:GOTO100 


JG 


3290 


DATA0, 248,0,0, 56, 0,0, 2 


AR 2310 IF RM=25 THEN 2640 


EA 


2880 


FOR J=1TO10:FORT=0TO15 






48,0 


JQ 2320 IF PM=26 THEN 2640 


FC 


2890 


PRINTCHR$(19) ; 


PP 


3300 


DATA0,48,0,2, 186, 192,1 


PB 2330 IF RM=29 THEN 2640 


XB 


2900 


POKE214,ll;PRINT 






5,171,240 


KB 2340 RM = RM-'1;GOTO300 


KM 


2910 


P0KE646,T 


GP 


3310 


DATA62,34,48,48,136,16 


MS 2350 IF RM=2 THEN 2640 


JK 


2920 


PRINTTAB(6) ; "CONGRATUL 






,0,168,68 


RR 2360 IF RM=3 THEN 2640 






ATIONS!" 


PM 


3320 


DATA0, 168, 0,0, 32, 0,0,1 


PA 2370 IF RM=9 THEN 2640 


BS 


2930 


NEXTT: NEXT J 






68,0 


QD 2380 IF RM=ll THEN 2640 


GX 


294 


GOTO2840 


GX 


3330 


DATA2, 170, 0,2, 138, 0,10 


SA 2390 IF RM=14 THEN 2640 


GJ 


2950 


REM — ARCHER (GIRL) *LE 






,10,0 


QH 2400 IF RM=17 THEN 2640 






FT"" 


FE 


3340 


DATA10, 2,128, 15, 3,192, 


BF 2410 IF RM=18 THEN 2640 


QA 


2960 


DATA1,0,0,4,0,0,4,85,8 






63,15,192 


QE 2420 IF RM=19 THEN 2640 









DD 


3350 


REM— 'HUNTER (GUY) *RIG 


CH 2430 IF RM=22 THEN 2640 


FX 


2970 


DATA16,63,80,I6,15,64, 






HT"" 


KE 2440 IF RM=26 THEN 2640 






16,63,0 


KD 


3360 


DATA2,0, 0,10, 160,0, 8,1 


BM 2450 IF RM^27 THEN 2640 


DG 


2980 


DATA16,12,0,62,170,160 






68,0 


KK 2460 IF RM=2S THEN 2640 






,30,171,232 


EQ 


3370 


DATA0,172,0,0,176,0,0, 


JX 2470 IF RM=25 THEN 2760 


MD 


2990 


DATA16 , 42 , 224 ,16,42,0 , 






252,0 


PS 2480 RM=RM+5:GOTO300 






16,8,0 


BP 


3380 


DATA0, 32,0,3, 168, 80, 95 


PF 2490 IF RM=1 THEN 2640 


XK 


3000 


DATA4,34,0,4, 170, 128,1 






,233,16 


AF 2500 IF R«=2 THEN 2640 






,170,128 


BC 


3390 


DATA93,85,85,0,164,64, 


KE 2510 IF RM=^3 THEN 2640 


MC 


3010 


DATA0,170,128,3,192,24 






0,165,0 


CM 2520 IF RM-4 THEN 2640 






0,3,192,240 


SH 


3400 


DATA0, 168, 0,0, 32, 0,0,1 


PK 2530 IF RM=5 THEN 2640 


FG 


3020 


DATA3, 192, 240, 10,0,40, 






68,0 


MX 2540 IF RM=7 THEN 2640 






42,0,168 


CJ 


3410 


DATA2,170,0,2, 138,0, 10 


DR 2550 IF RM=B THEN 2640 


QQ 


3030 


REM""HUNTBR (GIRL) *RI 






,10,0 


KS 2560 IF RM=^14 THEN 2640 






GHT"" 


FH 


3420 


DATA10,I0,0,12,3,0,15, 


KD 2570 IF RM=16 THEN 2640 


JS 


3040 


DATA128, 0,0,128, 0,0, 12 






3,192 


HE 2580 IF RM=19 THEN 2640 






8,21,80 


PJ 


3430 


REM"-SHADOW"" 


SQ 2590 IF RM=22 THEN 2640 


AP 


3050 


DATAi28,87,192,64,31,0 


HA 


3440 


DATA0,0,0,0, 32,0, 0,32, 


CQ 2600 IF RM=23 THEN 2640 






,128,95,192 









FD 2610 IF RM=24 THEN 2640 


ED 


3060 


DATAl29,95,i92,I28,12, 


KM 


3450 


DATA0, 136,0, 0,136, 0,2, 


DA 2620 IF RM=27 THEN 2640 






0,131,191,128 






70,0 


PE 2630 RM=RM-5:GOTO300 


JD 


3070 


DATA131, 239, 176,143, 17 


EQ 


3460 


DATA2, 2,0,0, 136, 0,0, 16 


PD 2640 PR1NTCHR$(19) ; 






1,172,240,42,172 






8,0 


XG 2650 P0KE214,8:PRINT 


QB 


3080 


DATA 128, 15,204,12 8,10, 


PQ 


3470 


DATA2, 170,169,10,170,1 


XF 2660 F0RT=1T04 






128,128,58,240 






69,10,42,40 


PB 2670 PRINTTAB(3) ;"{RVS}{5> 


AS 


3090 


DATA128,62,240,12S,60, 


RC 


3480 


DATA10, 138, 8,10, 106,0, 


iE>iRHE>iRJiE^<R>iE> 






240,128,252,252 






1,106,0 


{R><EJiR>iE><R><E><R> 


SG 


3100 


DATAi28,240,60,128,160 


EM 


3490 


DATA2 , 170 , , 10 , 170 , , 1 


<Ey<RHE>{R><EHR><E> 






,40,128,168,42 






0,170,0 


<R>" 


RQ 


3110 


REM—ARCHER (GUY) *RIG 


PM 


3500 


DATA4 2,170,128,4 2,170, 


RB 2680 PRINTTAB{3) ;"{RVS}<5> 






HT-" 






128,170,170,128 


iRHEHRHE>iRHEHR} 


GM 


3120 


DATA10, 160,32,42,168,8 


FS 


3510 


REM — GHOST — 


{E>iRHEHH>iEJ{RHE> 






,34,252,8 


BS 


3520 


DATA0,40,0,0, 170, 0,0,1 
70,0 


{R><EHR>iE>iR>iE>iRj 


DB 


3130 


DATA2, 192, 2,0,252, 2,0, 






<E>" 






48,2 


HJ 


3530 


DATA2,40,128,10,4 0,160 


QP 2690 NEXTT 


QS 


3140 


DATA10, 138,2, 14, 171,2, 






,42,170,168 


KA 2700 PRINTCHR$(19) ; 






63,175,194 


EB 


3540 


DATA42, 170, 168,40,170, 


XR 2710 P0KE214,11:PRINT 


EX 


3150 


DATA240, 168,254, 192,16 






40,160, 170, 10 


SA 2720 PRINTTAB(7) ;"{WHT}A WA 






8,2,0,168,2 


GP 


3550 


DATA162, 170, 138, 162,17 
0,138,130,170,130 


LL BLOCKS" 


BG 


3160 


DATA0, 3 2, 2, 0,168,2,0,1 






AP 27 30 PRINTTABf7) ;"{WHT} 






68,2 


QK 


3560 


DATA162, 170, 138,34,170 
,136,2,170,128 


{2 SPACES}THIS HALL 


MG 


3170 


DATA2,170,2,2,138,8,10 






(2 S PACES } " 
AM 2740 FOR O=1TO1000 : NEXTO 


GX 


3180 


,138,8 

DATA10, 10, 32, 12,3,0,15 


PE 


3570 


DATA10,170,16 0, 10, 170, 
160,10,170,160 


DG 2750 GOTO 300 






,3,192 


AF 


3580 


DATA4 2,170,16 8, 10, 17 0, 
160,0,0,0 


FB 2760 IF LVL=1 THEN LVL«2:RM 


KE 


3190 


REM--WIZARD (GUY) *RIG 






-3 :GOTO300 






HT — 


AA 


3590 


REM — SERPENT — 


RK 2770 IF LVL=2 THEN LVL=3:RM 


SQ 


3200 


DATA2, 160, 0,10, 168, 0,8 


BR 


3600 


DATA0, 0,0, 0,160, 32,2,1 
68,160 


=18:GOTO300 






,188,0 : 






QA 2780 IF LVL=3 THEN LVL=4:RM 


GK 


3210 


DATA4, 240, 0,0, 252,0,0, 


GJ 


3610 


DATA10,170,176,10,138, 
192,42,0,0 


=11:GOTO300 






48,8 






SA 2790 IF LVL-4 THEN LVL=5:RM 


HE 


3220 


DATA0, 168, 38,2,170,8,1 


JA 


3620 


DATA42,10,128,42,42,16 
0,42,22,80 


=2S:GOTO300 






0,170,172 






SG 2800 IF LVL=5 THEN 2880 


QF 


3230 


DATA10,170,172,56,170, 


AR 


3630 


DATAi68, 38,96,168,42,1 
60,168,32,32 


QK 2810 PRINTCHR$(19) ; 






40,50,170,8 






DF 2820 POKE214,ll:PRINT 


JP 


3240 


DATA0,136,8,10,34,8,10 


FA 


3640 


DATA 16 8, 10, 128, 170, 15, 
192,42,175,192 


DX 2830 PRINTTAB(7) ?"{WHT} 






,170,8 






{2 SPACES }GAME OVER" 


XJ 


3250 


DATA10,170,8, 10,170, 8, 


DE 


3650 


DATA42, 191,0, 10, 191,0, 


RH 2840 PRINTTAB(7);"{WHT}REST 






42,170,8 






2,252,0 

■^«iB«»*./v ^^ f^ f9 i^ fw /ir n n 


ART (Y/N) " 


AK 


3260 


DATA42, 170,8, 170, 171,8 


AQ 


3660 


DATA0 ,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 


GD 2850 GETKY$:IF KY5==""THEN28 
50 


MK 


3270 


,60,3,200 
REM—WANDERER (GUY) *L 


SA 
PK 


3670 
3680 


REM— WINGED WARRIOR-" 
DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,5,65,8 



G-36 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




D 



ROGRAMS 





DATA21, 125^94, 21, 255,8 
4,21,60,84 

DATA21,255,84,21,125,8 
4,23,191,212 



ss 


3690 


DR 


3700 


AA 


3710 


PQ 


3720 


GX 


3730 


PM 


3740 


KS 


3750 


MS 


3760 



239 



DATA117,254,93,125,170 
,125,85,170,85 
DATA86,130,149,70,130, 
145,70,130,145 
DATA66,130,129,2,0,12e 
,10,0,160 
REM""SKELETO« — 
DATA0, 170, 0,2, 170,128, 







2,40,128 


PD 


3770 


DATA2,0,128,2,170,128, 
0,170,0 


RP 


3780 


DATA0, 130,0,8,40, 32,34 
,40,136 


KE 


3790 


DATA0,130,0,32,40,8,32 
,130,8 


JD 


3800 


DATA32,40,8,32,130,8,0 
,40,0 


XR 


3810 


DATA0,130,0,0,130,0,0, 
130,0 


GR 


3820 


DATA2, 0,128, 2, 0,128, 10 
,0,160 


FR 


383 


REH— VAPOR DEMON — 


PC 


3840 


DATA2,170, 128, 10,170,1 



60,8,170,32 
XS 3850 DATA10, 40, 160, 10,170,1 

28,2,170,160 
AC 3860 DATA10, 130, 160, 10,40,1 

28,2,170,128 
CR 3870 DATA0, 170, 128,2,170,0, 

0,170,128 
JR 3880 DATA0, 170, 0,0, 170,0,0, 

40,0 
AM 3890 DATA0,168,0,0,40,0,8,8 

GM 3900 DATA0, 32, 136,2,32,0,32 
,2,32 



MARK GERHARDSTEIN 



The Meteor Mining Company is 
hiring pilots to fly a fleet of ships 
for collecting asteroids in outer 
space. It has devised a test to dis- 
cover people who have the necessary 
talents to pilot a spaceship while si- 
multaneously solving problems to de- 
cide which asteroids are valuable. 

The object of Meteor Math is to 
collect correct answers to simple math 
problems while avoiding the incorrect 
ones. You'll be given the first number 
in an addition or multiplication prob- 
lem and its answer. It will be your job 
to maneuver your ship through a field 
of moving numbers to collect the one 
that completes the problem. 

Getting Started 

Although Meteor Math loads and runs 
like a BASIC program, it's written en- 
tirely in machine language. Use MLX, 
our machine language entry program, 
to type it in; see **Typing Aids" else- 
where in this section. When MLX 
prompts you, respond with the values 
given below. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 1658 

When you've finished typing, don't 
forget to save a copy of the program 
before exiting MLX. 

Playing the Game 

When you run Meteor Math, the title 
screen will ofTer you several options. 
Press fl and B to set the beginning 
and top levels. The level is the first 
number in the math equation. You 
can solve problems that start with the 
same number each time or cycle 
through them in consecutive order. 
Press T to set the gamers time 
limit. Games can last from one to 
nine minutes and will continue until 



that time limit has been reached or 
three ships have been destroyed. 

You set the speed at which the 
answers scroll by pressing B for begin- 
ner, N for normal, or E for expert. 
This option always defaults to nor- 
mal, although the other options will 
remain as you've set them. 




PRACTICE ADDITION 
OR MULTIPLICATION 

WHILE FLYING 
THROUGH SPACE IN 
THIS EDUCATIONAL 
GAME FOR THE 64 



When you're ready to begin, 
press n to complete addition prob- 
lems or f5 to complete multiplication 
ones. Control your ship with a joy- 
stick plugged into port 2. 

As your ship flies through the 
field of possible answers, you want to 
collect the right one. Touching a cor- 
rect answer with your ship collects it. 
Youll receive two points for each cor- 
rect answer and a bonus for each level 
you complete. The amount of the bo- 
nus depends on the level that you've 



finished. Level 9 is worth more than 
level 8, for example. 

Running into an incorrect answer 
will destroy your ship. You may have 
to let some correct ones go by if 
they're too close to other numbers. 
When a ship has been destroyed or 
you've collected the correct number, 
the math problem changes; stay alert. 

If your ship needs extra speed to 
snare the correct answer, press your 
fire button. This engages your turbo- 
thrusler, which doubles the speed of 
your ship. Turbo fuel is expensive; 
this speed can be maintained for only 
about ten seconds per ship. The game 
ends when either the time limit has 
expired or you've crashed three ships 
into incorrect answers. 

There's no real qualifying score 
in Meteor Math. I wrote this program 
to give my children practice with ad- 
dition and the multiplication tables 
and to keep them from figuring out 
the answers by counting on their fin- 
gers. I made it flexible so that they 
could design their own tests, spending 
more time practicing problems in 
their areas of biggest need. 



METEOR MATH 












0801:14 


08 


0A 


00 


9E 


32 


30 


37 


B3 


0809:30 


3A 


8F 


20 


4D 


41 


52 


4B 


13 


0811:47 


32 


00 


00 


00 


A9 


80 


8D 


86 


0819:0B 


D4 


A2 


00 


BD 


99 


12 


90 


4E 


0821:00 


20 


BD 


99 


13 


9D 


00 


21 


BA 


0829:BD 


99 


14 


9D 


00 


22 


BD 


99 


78 


0831:15 


9D 


00 


23 


CA 


D0 


E5 


A9 


74 


0839:40 


A9 


00 


9D 


BF 


23 


CA 


D0 


9E 


0841:F8 


20 


44 


E5 


A2 


2F 


BD 


F6 


01 


0849:09 


9D 


00 


D0 


CA 


10 


F7 


A9 


82 


0851:80 


8D 


FA 


07 


8D 


FC 


07 


8D 


D0 


0859:FD 


07 


A9 


83 


8D 


FE 


07 


A9 


B7 


0861;8B 


8D 


F8 


07 


A9 


8A 


8D 


FB 


B8 


0869:07 


A9 


8D 


8D 


FF 


07 


A9 


8C 


ED 


0871:80 


F9 


07 


A2 


19 


BD 


25 


0A 


E5 


0879:90 


00 


04 


CA 


10 


F7 


A9 


3E 


91 


0881:85 


FC 


A9 


0A 


85 


FD 


A0 


00 


CE 


0389:B1 


FC 


F0 


0C 


20 


D2 


FF 


E6 


C3 


0891:FC 


D0 


02 


E6 


FD 


40 


87 


08 


3B 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 0-37 




D 



ROGRAMS 



§%BB 


:AD 


4C 


XI 


8D 


47 


11 


09 


30 


4F 


0B01:9F 20 53 48 49 50 53 


2E 3E 


0069:11 


09 


80 


80 


FA 


07 


AD 


4A 00 


08A1 


:8D 


29 


06 


AD 


4D 


11 


18 


69 


A6 


0B09 


:96 11 0D 20 20 20 20 


20 34 


0071 


:11 


30 


34 


BD 


2B 


00 


09 


30 52 


08A9 


:2F 


8D 


51 


06 


A9 


01 


SD 


48 


F3 


0B1I 


:96 CF B7 B7 B7 B7 B7 


B7 9C 


0D79 


:8D 


45 


11 


BD 


2B 


0D 


18 


60 D4 


08B1 


:11 


A 9 


30 


8D 


01 


12 


A9 


02 


39 


0B19 


:B7 B7 B7 B7 B7 B7 B7 


B7 2F 


0081 


:47 


11 


C9 


0A 


90 


II 


18 


69 BF 


08B9 


:8D 


4A 


11 


A9 


09 


8D 


46 


11 


FB 


0B21 


:B7 B7 B7 B? B7 B7 B7 


B7 37 


0089 


:76 


8D 


FO 


07 


A9 


81 


8D 


FC DO 


08C1 


;A9 


00 


8D 


26 


10 


A9 


00 


8D 


6F 


0B29 


:B7 B7 B7 B7 B7 B7 B7 


B7 3F 


0D91 


:07 


20 


29 


10 


4C 


5E 


0D 


09 5C 


08C9 


:25 


10 


A9 


00 


8D 


27 


10 


A9 


78 


0B31 


:D0 20 0D ID ID ID 20 


96 5F 


0D99 


:80 


8D 


FD 


07 


A9 


80 


80 


FC EE 


08D1 


:FF 


8D 


28 


10 


A9 


IE 


8D 


4B 


77 


0B39 


:20 A5 9E 20 46 31 2D 


20 10 


0DA1 


107 


20 


29 


10 


4C 


5E 


00 


4C AF 


08D9 


:11 


AD 


49 


11 


09 


30 


8D 


41 


7D 


0B41 


:53 45 54 53 20 53 54 


41 4A 


0DA9 


:1A 


0F 


20 


B7 


0D 


4C 


5E 


00 77 


08E1 


;07 


20 


3A 


0D 


A5 


CB 


C9 


16 


9B 


0B4 9 


:52 54 49 4E 47 20 4C 


45 44 


0DB1 


:20 


S5 


00 


4C 


5E 


00 


A9 


09 3F 


08E9 


:F0 


31 


C9 


04 


F0 


30 


C9 


05 


19 


0B51 


:56 45 4C 20 20 20 31 


20 73 


0DB9 


:8D 


46 


11 


EE 


47 


11 


AD 


47 5E 


08F1 


:F0 


46 


C9 


06 


F0 


73 


C9 


03 


91 


0B59 


:20 92 96 A7 20 0D ID 


ID FD 


0DO1 


:I1 


0A 


AA 


20 


A7 


0F 


AD 


47 5A 


08F9 


:F0 


55 


C9 


IC 


F0 


14 


C9 


0E 


4C 


0361 


:1D 20 20 A5 9E 20 46 


33 AI 


0DC9 


:11 


CD 


40 


11 


F0 


00 


C9 


0A F3 


0901 


:F0 


13 


C9 


27 


F0 


12 


4C 


E5 


4A 


0B69 


:2D 20 53 45 54 53 20 


45 52 


0DDI 


:D0 


05 


A9 


01 


80 


47 


II 


20 A6 


0909 


:08 


A5 


C5 


C9 


40 


D0 


FA 


4C 


65 


0B71 


:4E 44 49 4E 47 20 4C 


45 66 


0DD9 


:3A 


0D 


60 


AD 


4C 


11 


80 


47 44 


0911 


:E5 


08 


4C 


84 


09 


4C 


A8 


09 


BD 


0B79 


:56 45 4C 20 20 20 20 


20 79 


0DE1 


:11 


4C 


08 


00 


A9 


09 


80 


46 56 


0919 


:4C 


96 


09 


4C 


BA 


09 


AE 


47 


7B 


0B81 


:31 20 20 92 96 A7 20 


0D 06 


0DE9 


:II 


20 


3A 


00 


60 


A9 


00 


85 DB 


0921 


:11 


E8 


E0 


0A 


D0 


02 


A2 


01 


37 


0B89 


:1D ID ID 96 20 20 A5 


20 6F 


0OF1 


;FC 


AE 


46 


11 


30 


48 


E0 


0A 7E 


0929 


:8E 


47 


11 


8E 


4C 


11 


8A 


09 


24 


0B91 


:20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 A7 


0OF9 


:B0 


4 A 


AD 


47 


11 


09 


80 


80 64 


1 0931 


:30 


8D 


29 


06 


E8 


4C 


43 


09 


4C 


0B99 


:20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 AF 


0E01 


:FA 


07 


AD 


4A 


11 


30 


34 


BD 26 


0939 


:AE 


4D 


11 


E8 


E0 


0B 


D0 


02 


7D 


0BA1 


:20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 B7 


0E09 


:2B 


0D 


09 


30 


80 


45 


11 


BO 83 


0941 


:A2 


02 


8E 


4D 


11 


8A 


18 


69 


18 


0BA9 


:20 20 20 20 20 A7 20 


0D CA 


0EI1 


:2B 


00 


AC 


47 


11 


A9 


00 


18 57 


0949 


.2F 


8D 


51 


06 


4C 


0A 


09 


78 


F5 


0BB1 


:1D ID ID 20 96 20 A5 


99 5D 


0EI9 


:7D 


2B 


00 


88 


00 


F9 


C9 


0A F4 


0951 


.A9 


8A 


8D 


FB 


07 


20 


44 


E5 


73 


0BB9 


,20 42 20 2D 20 53 45 


54 74 


0E21 


;90 


07 


S6 


FC 


E9 


0A 


AC 


IF 23 


0959 


20 


Dl 


09 


A9 


00 


8D 


0A 


DC 


D2 


0BC1 


:53 20 42 45 47 49 4E 


4E 70 


0E29 


:0E 


09 


80 


SD 


FD 


07 


A5 


FC CB 


0961 


8D 


09 


DC 


8D 


08 


DC 


4C 


5E 


9B 


0BC9 


:45 52 20 53 50 45 45 


44 B6 


0E31 


:69 


80 


80 


FO 


07 


20 


29 


10 BE 


0969 


0D 


78 


A9 


8E 


8D 


FB 


07 


20 


C8 


0BD1 


:20 20 20 20 20 20 92 


96 4 3 


0E39 


;4C 


EE 


00 


4C 


lA 


0F 


20 


B7 A2 


0971 


44 


E5 


20 


Dl 


09 


A9 


00 


8D 


BC 


0BD9 


:A7 20 0D ID ID ID 96 


20 E9 


0E4I 


:0O 


4C 


EE 


0D 


20 


E5 


00 


4C A4 


0979 


0A 


DC 


8D 


09 


DC 


8D 


08 


DC 


14 


0SE1 


20 A5 99 20 4E 20 20 


20 14 


0E49 


:EE 


0D 


4C 


42 


08 


9E 


40 


49 6C 


0981 


AC 


EE 


0D 


A9 


02 


80 


C9 


06 


91 


0BE9 


53 45 54 53 20 4E 4F 


52 E5 


0E51 


:53 


53 


49 


4F 


4E 


20 


43 


4F 02 


0939 


A9 


00 


8D 


48 


11 


A9 


30 


8D 


C3 


0BF1 


4D 41 4C 20 53 50 45 


45 36 


0E59 


:4D 


50 


4C 


45 


54 


45 


11 


9D 85 


0991 


01 


12 


4C 


0A 


09 


A9 


0E 


8D 


6B 


0BF9 


44 20 20 99 20 20 20 


4E E7 


0E61 


:9D 


9D 


9D 


90 


90 


9D 


90 


9D 7D 


0999 


C9 


06 


A9 


01 


8D 


43 


11 


A9 


B0 


0C01 


20 96 20 A7 20 0D ID 


ID D9 


0E69 


:9D 


99 


49 


4E 


11 


90 


90 


II 14 


09AI 


30 


8D 


01 


12 


4C 


0A 


09 


A9 


B6 


0C09 


ID 20 96 20 A5 99 20 


4 5 A5 


0E71 


:9D 


9D 


9D 


05 


20 


30 


30 


20 0A 


09A9 


05 


8D 


C9 


06 


A9 


01 


8D 


48 


EF 


0C11 


20 2D 20 53 45 54 53 


20 FF 


0E79 


:9A 


4D 


49 


4E 


II 


9D 


90 


90 IC 


09B1 


11 


A9 


F0 


8D 


01 


12 


4C 


0A 


A0 


0C19 


45 58 50 45 52 54 20 


53 BF 


0E81 


:9D 


9D 


90 


05 


30 


30 


20 


9A F4 


09B9 


09 


EE 


49 


11 


AD 


49 


11 


C9 


C4 


0C21 


50 45 45 44 20 20 20 


20 81 


0E39 


:53 


45 


43 


IE 


A6 


A6 


A6 


A6 AE 


09Ci 


0A 


90 


02 


A9 


01 


8D 


49 


11 


B9 


0C29 


20 20 20 20 92 96 A7 


20 BD 


0E91 


:A6 


A 6 


A 6 


A6 


A6 


A6 


11 


9D 79 


09C9 


09 


30 


8D 


41 


07 


4C 


0A 


09 


B8 


0C31 


0D ID ID ID 96 20 20 


A5 A7 


0E99 


:9D 


90 


90 


9D 


90 


9D 


9D 


9D B5 


09D1 


A2 


09 


A0 


00 


CA 


CA 


30 


18 


85 


0C39 


20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 51 


0EA1 


:9D 


A6 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 IE 


09D9 


8A 


99 


00 


D8 


E8 


8A 


99 


00 


09 


0C41 


20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 59 


0EA9 


20 


20 


A6 


11 


90 


90 


90 


90 FF 


09E1' 


D9 


E8 


8A 


99 


00 


DA 


CA 


8A 


91 


0C49 


20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 61 


0EB1 


:9D 


9D 


9D 


9D 


90 


90 


A6 


20 62 


09E9- 


99 


00 


DB 


CA 


C8 


D0 


E5 


60 


A6 


0C51^ 


20 20 20 20 20 20 A7 


20 78 


0EB9 


:20 


05 


30 


30 


30 


30 


20 


20 D2 


09P1 


A2 


09 


4C 


D5 


09 


20 


D2 


20 


0D 


0C59' 


0D ID ID ID 96 20 20 


A5 CF 


0EC1 


:1E 


A6 


11 


9D 


9D 


90 


9D 


90 CE 


09r9: 


D2 


32 


39 


IB 


57 


19 


6E 


32 


09 


0C61: 


9C 20 54 20 2D 20 53 


45 32 


0EC9 


:9D 


90 


90 


90 


90 


A6 


20 


20 91 


0A01- 


6E 


20 


3C 


32 


4D 


BC 


99 


50 


EC 


0C69: 


54 53 20 54 49 4D 45 


20 F3 


0ED1 


:20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


A6 


11 EB 


0A09- 


E2 


00 


FF 


C8 


00 


15 


78 


F0 


51 


0C71: 


4C 49 4D 49 54 20 20 


20 03 


0ED9 


.90 


9D 


9D 


90 


9D 


9D 


9D 


9D F5 


0A11: 


19 


76 


08 


00 


00 


06 


00 


FI 


5A 


0C79: 


20 20 20 20 32 20 96 


20 0F 


0EE1 


9D 


9D 


A6 


20 


9C 


50 


4F 


49 19 


0A19: 


F2 


F3 


07 


04 


05 


F4 


07 


04 


D2 


0C81: 


A7 20 00 ID ID ID 96 


20 93 


0EE9 


4E 


54 


53 


20 


IE 


A6 


II 


90 F9 


0A21: 


07 


07 


0A 


0E 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


8D 


0C89: 


20 A5 20 20 20 20 20 


20 03 


0EFI 


9D 


9D 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 0E 


0A29: 


00 


00 


E9 


00 


00 


00 


00 


81 


FB 


0C91: 


20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 A9 


0EF9 


9D 


A6 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 76 


0A31: 


00 


FF 


00 


FF 


00 


00 


80 


00 


46 


0C99: 


20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 Bl 


0F01 


20 


20 


A 6 


11 


90 


90 


90 


90 59 


0A39; 


00 


00 


80 


02 


CA 


11 


9E 


20 


75 


0CA1: 


20 20 20 20 20 20 20 


20 B9 


0F09 


9D 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


A6 


A6 42 


0A41: 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


55 


0CA9: 


A7 20 0D ID ID ID 20 


81 30 


0F11 


A6 


A6 


A6 


A6 


A6 


A6 


A6 


A6 2F 


0A49: 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


4D 


45 


54 


90 


0CB1: 


20 A5 9F 20 46 35 2D 


20 BA 


0FI9 


00 


58 


A2 


05 


A0 


0F 


18 


20 83 


0A5l! 


4 5 


4F 


52 


20 


4D 


41 


54 


48 


88 


0CB9: 


53 54 41 52 54 53 20 


4D 5B 


0F21 


F0 


FF 


A2 


00 


BD 


8C 


0E 


F0 39 


0A59! 


0D 


11 


9C 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


AF 


0CC1: 


55 4C 54 49 50 4C 49 


43 40 


0F29 


07 


20 


02 


FF 


E8 


40 


25 


0F FE 


0A61: 


20 


20 


43 


4F 


4C 


4C 


45 


43 


4C 


0CC9: 


41 54 49 4F 4E 20 20 


20 09 1 


0F3I 


A9 


00 


80 


08 


04 


80 


07 


04 16 


0A69: 


54 


20 


43 


4F 


52 


52 


45 


43 


B6 


0CD1: 


20 92 96 A7 20 0D ID 


ID 78 


0F39 


A 2 


0D 


A0 


0C 


18 


20 


F0 


FF E3 


0A71: 


54 


20 


41 


4E 


53 


57 


45 


52 


99 


0CD9: 


10 20 81 20 A5 9F 20 


4 6 EC 


0F4I 


A2 


00 


BD 


4E 


0E 


20 


02 


FF E3 


0A7 9: 


53 


0D 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


62 


0CE1: 


37 2D 20 53 54 41 52 


54 BA 


0F49 


E8 


E0 


3E 


90 


F5 


AD 


26 


10 A7 


0A81: 


20 


57 


48 


49 


4C 


45 


20 


41 


12 


0CE9; 


53 20 41 44 44 49 54 


49 59 


0F51 


09 


30 


80 


20 


05 


AD 


25 


10 BO 


0A89: 


56 


4F 


49 


44 


49 


4E 


47 


20 


3C 


0CF1: 


4F 4E 20 20 20 20 20 


20 2D 


0F59 


09 


30 


8D 


2C 


05 


AD 


27 


10 B9 


0A91: 


49 


4E 


43 


4F 


52 


52 


45 


43 


E4 


0CF9: 


20 20 20 20 92 96 A7 


20 8E 


0F61 


09 


30 


8D 


2B 


05 


A 9 


BF 


8D 50 


0A99; 


54 


0D 


9E 


53' 


48 


49 


50 


53 


7F 


0D01: 


0D ID ID ID 96 20 20 


CO A0 


0F6 9 


15 


00 


AD 


09 


DC 


29 


0F 


09 3F 


0AA1; 


9C 


20 


20 


4F 


4E 


45 


53 


0D 


40 


0D09: 


AF AF AF AF AF AF AF 


AF 23 


0F71 


30 


8D 


B9 


06 


AD 


09 


DC 


29 17 


0AA9: 


0D 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


34 


0D11: 


AF AF AF AF AF AF AF 


AF 2B 


0F79 


70 


4A 


4A 


4A 


4A 


09 


30 


8D B4 


0AB1: 


IE 


54 


48 


45 


20 


46 


49 


52 


46 


0D19: 


AF AF AF AF AF AF AF 


AF 33 


0F81 


B8 


06 


AD 


0A 


DC 


29 


0F 


09 86 


0AB9: 


45 


20 


42 


55 


54 


54 


4F 


4E 


F6 


0D21: 


AF AF AF AF AF AF BA 


20 CI 


0F89: 


30 


8D 


91 


06 


AD 


0A 


00 


29 2E 


0AC1: 


53 


20 


45 


4E 


47 


41 


47 


45 


28 


0D29: 


00 60 00 01 02 03 04 


05 94 


0F91; 


70 


4A 


4A 


4A 


4A 


09 


30 


30 CC 


0AC9: 


53 


0D 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


B2 


0031: 


06 07 08 09 00 01 02 


03 AC 


0F99: 


90 


06 


EE 


20 


00 


A5 


CB 


C9 DF 


0AD1: 


20 


59 


4F 


55 


52 


30 


54 


55 


9C 


0D39: 


04 A2 09 A9 0B 9D 2B 


0D EB 


0FA1: 


40 


F0 


F7 


4C 


42 


08 


EE 


26 16 


0AD9: 


52 


42 


4F 


20 


54 


48 


52 


55 


51 


0D41: 


CA 10 F8 A2 09 AD IB 


D4 18 


0FA9: 


10 


AD 


26 


10 


C9 


0A 


00 


17 30 


0AE1: 


53 


54 


45 


52 


2E 


0D 


00 


9F 


El 


0D49: 


C9 0A B0 F9 A0 09 D9 


2B 88 


0FB1: 


A9 


00 


8D 


26 


10 


EE 


25 


10 4F 


0AE9: 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


59 


37 


0D51: 


0D F0 F2 88 10 F8 9D 


2B DF 


0FB9: 


AD 


25 


10 


C9 


0A 


D0 


08 


A9 E3 


0AF1: 


4F 


55 


20 


53 


54 


41 


52 


54 


DC 


0D59: 


0D CA 10 E9 60 AE 46 


11 A8 


0FC1: 


00 


80 


2 5 


10 


EE 


27 


10 


CA E7 


0AF9: 


20 


57 


49 


54 


48 


20 


9E 


33 


95 


0D61: 


30 48 E0 0A B0 4A AD 


47 B3 


0FC9: 


D0 


DC 


A9 


23 


85 


FD 


A9 


C0 27 



a-38 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




PROGRAMS 



0FD1:85 


FC 


A0 


lA 


AD 


26 


10 


20 


ED 


1239:E6 


FF 


A5 


FF 


9D 


80 


12 


C9 


62 


14A1:F8 


2E AA B8 2E 00 B8 2E C3 




0FD9: 


EE 


0F 


A0 


19 


AD 


25 


10 


20 


IB 


1241: 


07 


D0 


06 


A5 


FE 


C9 


D0 


B0 


A9 


14A9: 


00 


B8 2E 00 88 2E 00 B8 FC 




0FE1: 


EE 


0F 


A0 


18 


AD 


27 


10 


20 


IB 


1249; 


0C 


Bl 


FC 


91 


FE 


A9 


20 


91 


09 


i4Bl: 


2E 


00 B8 2F AA F8 0B FF 4A 




0FE9: 


EE 


0F 


4C 


0B 


10 


0A 


0A 


0A 


44 


1251: 


FC 


CA 


10 


CC 


60 


A9 


04 


85 


AC 


14B9: 


E0 


2F AA F8 2E 00 88 2E 14 




0FF1: 


AA 


A9 


33 


85 


01 


BD 


80 


Dl 


60 


1259: 


FF 


9D 


80 


12 


AD 


IB 


D4 


29 


C2 


14C1: 


00 


B8 2E 00 B8 2E 00 B8 15 




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TYPING AIDS 




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malic Proofreader are utilities thai help 




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you type 


in Gazette prosrams without 




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making mistakes. These labor-saving utili- 




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00 
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ties are on each Gazette Disk and printed 
in issues o( Gazette through June 1990. 




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10 


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If you don't have access to a back is- 




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sue or to one of our disks, write and we'll 




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sendyoi 


1 free copies of both of these 




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handy utilities. We'll also include instruc- | 




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lions on 


how to type in Gazette programs. 




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60 


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Please enclose a self-addressed, stamped 




1219 
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80 
12 


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12 
85 


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08 
00 


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IC 


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39 
68 


envelope. Write to Typing Aids, CX)M- 
PUTFs Gazette, 324 West Wendover Av- 




1231 


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98 


enue, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 














_ 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE G-30 



How to Type In 
COMPUTE'S Gazette Programs 



Each month. Gazette publishes pro- 
grams for the Commodore 128 and 64. 
Each program is clearly marked by title 
and version. Be sure to type in the 
correct version for your machine. All 64 
programs run on the 128 in 64 mode. Be 
sure to read the instructions in the cor- 
responding article. This can save time 
and eliminate any questions which 
might arise after you begin typing. 

We regularly publish two pro- 
grams designed to make typing easier: 
The Automatic Proofreader, for BASIC 
programs, and MIX, for entering ma- 
chine language programs. 

When entering a BASIC program, 
be especially careful with DATA state- 
ments, as they are extremely sensitive 
to errors. A mistyped number in a 
DATA statement can cause your ma- 
chine to ''lock up" (you'll have no con- 
trol over the computer). If this happens, 
the only recourse is to turn your com- 
puter off and then on, erasing what was 
in memory. This could cause you to lose 
valuable data, so be sure to save a pro- 
gram before you run it. If your computer 
crashes, you can always reload the pro- 
gram and look for the error. 



Special Characters 

Most of the programs listed in each 
issue contain special control characters. 
To facilitate typing in any programs 
from Gazette, use the following listing 
conventions. 

The most common type of control 
characters in our listings appear as 
words within braces: {DOWN} means 
to press the cursor-down key; {5 
SPACES} means to press the space bar 
five times. 

To indicate that a key should be 
shifted (hold down the Shift key while 
pressing another key), the character is 
underlined. For example, A means hold 
down the Shift key and press A. You 
may see strange characters on your 
screen, but that's to be expected. If you 
find a number followed by an under- 
lined key enclosed in braces (for ex- 
ample, {8 A}), type the key as many 
times as indicated (in our example, en- 
ter eight shifted A's). 

If a key is enclosed in special 
brackets, | |t hold down the Commo- 
dore key (at the lower left comer of the 
keyboard) and press the indicated 
character. 



Rarely, you'll see a single letter of 
the alphabet enclosed in braces. This 
can be entered on the Commodore 64 
by pressing the Ctrl key while typing 
the letter in braces. For example, {A} 
means to press Ctrl-A. 

The Quote Mode 

You can move the cursor around the 
screen with the Crsr keys, but you may 
want to move it under program control, 
as in examples like {LEFT} and 
{HOME} in the listings. The, only way 
the computer can tell the difference be- 
tween direct and programmed cursor 
control is the quote mode. 

Once you press the quote key, 
you're in quote mode, which can be 
confusing if you mistype a character 
and cursor left to change it. You'll see a 
graphics symbol for cursor left. Use the 
delete key to back up and edit the line. 
Type another quotation mark to get out 
of quote mode. If things get too confus- 
ing, exit quote mode by pressing Re- 
turn; then cursor up to the mistyped 
line and fix it. If the mistake involves 
cursor movement, you must press the 
quote key to reenter quote mode. Q 



When You Read: 

{CLR} 

{HOME) 

{UP) 

{DOWN} 

{LEFT} 

{RIGHT} 

{RVS} 

{OFF} 

{BLK} 

{WHT} 

{RED} 

{CYN} 



Press: 



See: 



SHIFT 


CLR/HOME 




CLR/HOME 


SHIFT 


f CRSR I 




\ CRSR I 


SHIFT 


^— CRSR— * 




^CRSR — 



CTRL 



[mri[ 



CTRL 



CTRL 2 




CTRL 


$ 




CTRL 


4 



When You Read: 

{PUR} 
(GRN} 
{BLU} 
{YEL} 

{ Fl } 
{ F2 } 
{ B } 
{ H ) 
( F5 } 
{ F6 } 
{ F7 } 
{ F8 } 



Press: 



See: 



CTRL 5 




CTRL 1 6 


CTRL 7 




CTRL 8 



When You Read: 

t 



Press: 



See: 



m 



For Commodore 64 Only 



fl 




SHIFT 


fl 


B 




SHIFT 


f3 




f5 




SHIFT 


is 




f7 


SHIFT 


a 






1 COMMODORE 1 1 


: COMMODORE 1 2 | 


COMMODORE 3 


COMMODORE 1 4 


COMMODORE | 5 


commodore! 6 


COMMODORE 7 



D 



El] 

■I 
□ 



COMMODORE B 



COMPUTE JULY 1991 



COMPUTE' 

BEST PC GA 

Don't miss these six dazzling, ready-to-run games complete 
with a 16-page magazine jammed with instructions! 




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^ 


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w^ 


^ 







I III 



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twiilf »« 6».1i* L^ 



Laser Chess 

Award-winning, two-player strategy 

game patterned after chess— but 

with an exciting new twist. 



Power Poker 

Addictive strategy game with a new 

dimension. Fun for one player or a 
group. 




Block Out 

Colorful and delightful strategy 

game that everyone in the family 

will want to play. 




Bounty Hunter 

Catch the crook and collect the 

bounty! So much fun, you'll never 

know you Ye mastering U.S. 

geography. 



Wormburner 

Skill and arcade action combine to 
form an unbeatable challenge. 



Supplies Limited, So Order Early! 



QuikServe 

Fling those fries! Sling those 

shakes! Bounce those burgers! A 

frenzied arcade-style game for the 

stout-hearted only. 



YES! 



I want to have the time of my lifel Send 
me COMPUTE'S BEST PC GAMES disk. I'll pay just 
$5.95 for each 5V4-inch or $6.95 for each 3V2-inch 
disk plus $2.00 shipping and handling per disk. 

Please indicate how many disks of each format you'd like: 

5V4-mch disks at Jgifr^fich $5.95 each 

^3y2-inch disks at $Tp:»:agch S6.95 each 

Subtotal 

., Sales tax (Residents of NC and NY, please add appro- 
priate sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 7% 
goods and services tax. ) 

Shipping and handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 

surface mail, $5.00 airmail per disk. For delivery out- 
side the U.S. or Canada, add $10.00 for postage and 
handling.) 

Total enclosed 



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Send your order to COMPUTE'S BEST PC GAMES 
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or VISA accepted fcr orders over S20. Ttiis offer wii ortiy be filled at tFie above address and ts not 
made «\ conjurxrtion with any other magazine (X disk-sutjscnpbon offer. Please aflow 4-6 weeks for 
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compatibles. Offer good white supplies last. 




REVIEWS 




IRESnHI 



H' hat can you do if it's Saturday 
afternoon and there's nobody 
around you can play chess 
with? Or if you're a shut-in 
and there's no one around to talk to? 
Or if you're an avid Red Baron or 
Stellar 7 player looking for a new level 
of excitement? The Sierra Network 
(TSN), which was announced on May 
6, may hold the answer. It's the first 
computer network dedicated to online 
game playing. 



^^dVbaTtre 







I Tn'* 




Your dossier and mugshot (which you 

create yourself) help other people to get 

to know — and play — you better. 

In fact, the philosophy behind the 
Sierra Network is person-to-person 
game playing. There's no option to 
play against the computer, nor will 
there be. Human interaction is key. 
Chess, checkers, hearts, backgammon, 
bridge, and cribbage are the games 
available as this is being written, but 
according to the comments left in the 
bulletin board area, there is a strong 
demand for other kinds of two-player 
adventure and action games. Sierra 
intends to use TSN as a conduit for 
modem games like Red Baron and 
Stellar 7, allowing players to fight a 
realtime dogfight or tank engagement 



against a human opponent anywhere 
within the bounds of Telenet. 

TSN displays the distinct Sierra 
EGA 16-color look: blocky letters, 
Larry Laffer graphics, and two-line di- 
alog boxes for conversation. But the 
company promises that soon the net- 
work will boast 256-color graphics 
and scanned images for playing 
boards, a segregated area for grown- 
ups called Larry Land (complete with 
a casino), and other exciting amenities. 

TSN can also be used to carry on 
a text conversation. And you can get 
in some checkers at the same time! 

ROBERT BIXBY 



Scheduled to come online: June 1 991 
For IBM PC and compatibles— $1 1 ,95 
per month in selected cities; $2.00 an 
hour from 6:00 p,m, to 6:00 a.m. in others) 

SIERRA ON-LINE 
P.O. Box 485 
Coarsegold, CA 93614 
(209J 683^68 



CHUCK YEAGER'S 



The new Chuck Yeager'sAir Com- 
bat is the most versatile, exciting 
combat flight simulator to land on 
the PC You'd think a program 
that lets you fly six combat aircraft 
ranging from the piston-engined P-51 
Mustang to the Mach 2-capable MiG- 
2 1 Fishbed against 1 7 different types 
of enemy aircraft would be full of 
compromises. Not this one. Whether 
your combat is over WWII Europe, 
Korea, or Vietnam, you'll fmd the 
program as realistic as single-era 
simulators. 

As you'd expect in a simulation 
bearing the Yeager name, the planes 
fly very accurately. You won't be 
making hairpin turns at Mach 2 in 
your F-4, and you can't climb vertical- 
ly in a Focke-Wulf 190, 

The preset scenarios are a wel- 
come change from standard flight 
simulator fare. Many missions bring 



unexpected complications, such as en- 
emy MiGs showing up on what's sup- 
posed to be a ground attack mission. 
Others are unique; in one mission, 
you take on the role of Lt. Kim Sok 
Ho, the North Korean MiG-15 pilot 
who defected with his plane for a 
$100,000 reward. 




Take wing against a variety of enemy 
aircraft in this fatest simulation. 

The game uses a refined version 
of the graphics system used in EA's 
LHX Attack Chopper sind Stormovik 
simulators. The full release version 
promises digitized speech and explo- 
sions, as well as sound card support. 
Control with a mouse or trackball was 
awkward; this game definitely re- 
quires a joystick for full enjoyment. 

Fast action, original missions, 
and fascinating fantasy combat make 
this a must-have program for PC 
pilots. 

DENNY ATKIN 



Scheduled Release: Jurte 1 991 
For IBM PC and cx>mpatibles. 640K 
RAM— $59.95 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 
1820 Gateway Dr. 
San Mateo. CA 94404 
(415)571-7171 



What Are Sneak Peeks? 

Sneak Peeks are advance reviews of 
upcoming software and hardware prod- 
ucts. Every effort is made to ensure that 
the information contained in these re- 
views is accurate at the time they are 
published. COMPUTE will review the fi- 
nal edition when it becomes available. 



106 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



'M^^^^^MM&M 



A?4t»Va5^""(iy,&f*tii«<V 







i-reCH 



XHIEF 

7 



vDIBK 15 

I63e -'LEATHER CUIBAS3 
57 3^ SUEDE FAMTS 

■ ■■■ ■ -BIT3KIMS 

'^ STAYEo^W ISSUES 

COPPER KE^^ 3 



^yOU &AIMEJD S HIT FOIlCrSI 



Actual Screens from MS-DOS Version 




A NEW WIZARDRY 

Ten years ago. Wizardry set the standards in 
FRP. Now, after two million copies have been sold 
and 25 international awards have been won, 
Bane of the Cosmic Forge raises and redefines 
i those standards. This new Wizardry, the truest 
\ simulation ever of Fantasy Role Playing, will 
\ push your computer, your mind and your sense 
\ of adventure to their very limits. 

\ True FRP Simulation! 

\ Like a true game master. Bane of the Cosmic 

\ Forge rolls the dice, consults its charts and 
\ applies the rules. From the 400 items of armor 
\ and weaponry researched for authenticity - 
\ right down to their weights -to the realistic 
\ combat structure - incorporating Primary and 
^ \ Secondary attack- everything, absolutely 
^ •" \ everything, is calculated. 

\ Full-Color, Animated Graphics! 

\ You'll see swords swinging before your 

\ eyes; creatures of all shapes and forms will 

\ move before you,- spells coming from your 

\ magician will swirl through the air. You'll 

\ walk under gargoyle-laden arches and 

i,,,.^ — ^ watch candles flicker in their sconces. 
Your PC's internal speaker will play 

all of these digitized sounds without any add-on 

hardware . . . swords swinging, monsters venting 

their anger and spells letting fly. 

Uncompromising Variety! 

• 1 1 Races I53:-^ - 

• 14 Professions with Ranks 

• Dozens of Weaponry, Physical and 
Academia skills 

• Multiple Fighting and Parry Modes 

• Ranged, Primary and Secondary Weapons 

• Six spellbooks, 462 spell combinations 

• Multiple Armor Classes 

Artificial Intelligence! 

Find the ancient and cryptic dwellers who can aid 
you in your quest. Talk to them as you would your 
friends "in sentences. Only through the power of the 
latest in programming technology could the full 
dimensions of conversation this real be possible. 



Now Available for: MS-DOS, Amiga b Macintosh 

Circle Readftf Service Numb#r 257 



^]zhd4^* 



P.O. Box 245, Ogdensburg, New York 13669 

(315)393-6633 

To order: Visit a Dealer or caii 1 (800) 447-1230 




REVIEWS 




EUniU, MISTRESS 
OF THE DARK 

Killbragant Castle looms before 
you, looking nothing like the de- 
scription the adventurers' union 
gave of a quaint castle in the 
peaceful English countryside. Still, all 
youVe got to do is help the sweet 
young thing that lives there solve a 
tiny problem with some unwanted 
guests. *Tiece of cake," they said, *'a 
pleasant vacation." One glance at the 
captain of the guard confirms your 
worst fears— Killbragant is hardly 
quaint. You're in trouble all right, big 
trouble! 

Thus begins the fantasy adven- 
ture game Elvira, Mistress of the Dark, 
a successful mixture of a graphics ad- 
venture and fantasy role-playing 
game. As for that nice vacation, forget 
it; this vacation is the stuff of night- 
mares. It seems Elvira's great-grand- 
mother. Queen Emelda, is due for a 
resurrection and plans to rule the 
world with the help of her evil min- 
ions. Your task is to help Elvira find 
her chest and the six keys that open it 
in order to put a stop to Grandma's 
imminent return. Of course, Elvira's 
unwanted, not to mention undead, 
houseguests, including everything 
from zombie soldiers to a beautiful 
but deadly vampiress, are dead set on 
seeing to it that you fail. 

Elvira may start a new trend in 
graphics-oriented adventures. Many 
games sacrifice depth and length of 
play in favor of striking graphics. Ac- 
colade, however, has created a game 
that provides hours of play in addi- 
tion to stunning graphics. As you en- 
ter the castle, the attention to detail 
becomes apparent, and thanks to El- 
vira 's first-person perspective, the 
feeling of being there is immediate. As 
you wander the ancient grounds of 
Killbragant, you'll have the opportu- 
nity to battle a variety of creatures, all 
of which will grimace, scream, and 
snarl at you in remarkable detail I 



found the animation to be excellent. 
At one point in the game you'll en- 
counter a falcon, which scrolls 
smoothly across the screen just before 
ripping out your eyes. Another excel- 
lent animation sequence is the were- 
wolf transformation. I recommend 
that you bring some silver when you 
visit this guy, and Fm not talking 
about your fork and spoon. 




Visually stunning and full of dangerous 
surprises, f/Wra's only for the intrepid. 

The box states that Elvira con- 
tains blood-curdling graphics. This is 
a warning as well as a selling point; 
the game contains graphic violence. 
You will be beheaded, have your 
throat ripped out, and sustain various 
other fatal and unpleasant injuries — 
all with minute attention to detail 
The resuhs are sometimes shocking. 
For this reason, I feel that Elvira is not 
suitable for young children. 

Of course, a superior adventure 
game relies on more than good graph- 
ics for its appeal, and Elvira is no ex- 
ception. The game boasts an excellent 
soundtrack and supports today's most 
popular sound cards, I found the mu- 
sic to be very^ well done, creating ten- 
sion at just the right moment. 
.Another excellent feature is the incor- 
poration of digitized sound effects. No 
matter what sound card you're using, 
you'll still be able to hear screams, 
cries of agony, and the clash of steel 
on steel as you engage in battle. For 
those of you whose only source of 
sound is the PC speaker. Accolade has 
done a creditable job with the music, 



and you'll even be able to hear the 
digital sound. 

Elvira is an icon-driven game 
that uses a point-and-click interface. 
All the necessary icons are located on 
one screen, which speeds gameplay by 
minimizing the amount of mouse 
pushing you'll do. Needless to say, be- 
cause of the nature of the interface, a 
mouse is highly recommended. 

During the game all text, descrip- 
tions, and inventory items will appear 
in a lower window. Arrows direct your 
movement along the four compass 
points, and up or down arrows allow 
you to negotiate stairways. You ma- 
nipulate objects by using command 
icons such as Examine, Open, Close, 
Use, and the like. Picking up an object 
is a simple matter of clicking on it and 
dragging it to your inventory. Another 
interesting feature, the abihty to drop 
things in a room and retrieve them 
later, isn't found in many of today's 
graphic adventure games. 

During combat, when you con- 
front one of the castle beasties, a spe- 
cial combat window appears, alter- 
nately displaying Lunge/Hack and 
Block/Parry. The intelligent combat 
interface requires you not only to se- 
lect the proper attack or defense but 
also to time your defense correctly. 
Not that it's going to help you much. 
There's going to be a lot of blood 
spilled here — mostly yours. One more 
note on combat: Once you engage in 
battle, it's a fight to the death. If you 
wish to run or use magic against your 
enemy, you must do so before the 
combat window appears. 




Out for your blood, the ghastly denizens 
of Killbragant close in for the kilL 

Strategy for Elvira is somewhat 
simplistic; try to stay alive and grab 
everything that isn't nailed down. In 
the castle, you find some of the better 
weapons and other items used 
throughout the game. YouMl have to 



108 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



Remember Hhen He Couldn't 
Jeep His Hands Off He! 




Now he's got that NEO-GEO 

He used to play all night with 
me. Hot action, fantasy 
games..., you name it. 

Now he soys his NEO»GEO^ 
gives him more, plus major 
league sports, ninja warriors, 
and flame throwing enemies. 
Can you do that? he asks. 

I make my play but he's glued 
to NEO»GEO's vivid 4 dimen- 
sional graphics and 65,000 
colors. 



1 scream but he doesn't hear 
me above 15 channels of 
pure pulsating stereo sound 
with 7 dedicated to real voice 
speech! 

He says NEO»GEO is the most 
powerful home entertainment 
system in the world and that 
other systems don't even 
come close, ...and lately 
neither does he. 

I'll show him. HI play that 
NEO«GEO and beat the pants 
off him! 



Circle Reader S«rvice Number 221 




SNK 

Home Entertainment, Inc. 

For more information or the name 

of your local NEO-GEO dealer 

Call 1-800-800-NEO-GEO ext . 404 

Tlie mdemariti of NEOKJEO are Tegistered b>' SNK Home EnieitainirwfK Inc. 




REVIEWS 



GAMES 



engage in combat to enter many of the 
rooms in the castle, and since fighting 
is strictly on-the-job training, save 
often. The game has so many items 
you can pick up that I recommend se- 
lecting a centrally located room in the 
castle as a repository. I found that the 
library serves nicely, since it's never 
guarded. Make sure you read the doc- 
umentation, as it contains some good 
pointers. Last, but not least, if you tru- 
ly get stuck, Accolade does offer an ex- 
cellent hint book that includes a 
layout of the castle and grounds. 

Despite my disappointment with 
the lack of a user-friendly installation 
process and some minor documenta- 
tion oversights, I consider Elvira a 
noteworthy achievement. If a dank 
and dangerous setting is your element, 
you'll be right at home in Castle Kill- 
bragant. Grab a copy and begin your 
adventure — exploring Elvira may 
take days, but every moment's a thrill. 

GREGG OWENS 



IBM PC and compatibles; 640K RAM: 
EGA, VGA, or Tandy l6-co!or: hard drive- 
8-MHz or faster prcx^essor recommend- 
ed; mouse recommended; supports Ad 
Lib, Sound Blaster, Roland MT-32, Casio 
CT460, and CMS— S59.95 
Also available for Amiga — $59.95 and 
Atari ST— $59.95 

ACCOLADE 

550 S. Winchester Blvd. 

San Jose, CA 95128 

(408)985-1700 



THE DREAM TEAM 
3 ON 3 CHAllENBE 

H' ith the long, hot days of sum- 
mer quickly approaching, bas- 
ketball fans find themselves 
dreading the long wait for the 
action of their favorite sport to heat 
up. The wail is over! In The Dream 
Team S onS Challenge, three of the 
NBA's top stars are waiting to bring 
their brand of half-court action right 
into your living room. 

Joe Dumars, Patrick Ewing, and 
Dominique Wilkins are the team to 
beat in this fast-moving arcade chal- 
lenge. For one or two players, The 
Dream Team can be played either 
competitively or cooperatively and 
with one-, two-, or three-man teams. 
In any variation, players are chosen 



from a roster of 24 of the NBA's 
finest. 

You can also participate in the ul- 
timate challenge, the Dream Team 
Tournament. This single-elimination 
showdown is played between eight 
three-man teams, which are randomly 
paired in each game. Up to eight of 
the teams can be controlled by hu- 
mans, so you can invite seven of your 
friends over to see which of you really 
is number 1. 




Basketball season never ends with The 
Dream Team Three on Three Challenge. 

The mechanics of this game are 
easy to master. Your players dribble 
automatically as they move; every- 
thing else is just a matter of position- 
ing and timing. Press button 1 on your 
joystick to shoot, rebound, or block a 
shot; press button 2 to pass. The col- 
ored "pad" that appears beneath the 
feet of one of your players makes it in- 
stantly apparent which player you 
control at any given time. 

The Dream Team also involves 
tactical considerations, requiring you 
to select one of four active plays 
before inbounding the ball Choose 
from 1 6 preprogrammed plays, or de- 
sign your own. You can change your 
active plays as often as you like. Call- 
ing plays adds a bit of realism to the 
game and makes passes easier to exe- 
cute because you can anticipate the 
movements of your players. 

The Dream Team's designers ob- 
viously paid a great deal of attention 
to creating an attractive game, and it 
shows: This is easily the best-looking 
basketball game on the market. The 
graphics are rich and detailed to the 
point of shading the ball so that it ap- 
pears rounded and three-dimensional. 
Unlike some other games, The Dream 
Team won't strain your eyes. The 
players are large, bright, and colorfully 
animated, with moves such as a be- 



hind-the-back lay-up and a soaring 
two-handed slam along the baseline. 

The weakest part of this game in- 
volves the sound effects, which are 
limited to the sound of dribbling, the 
ball hitting the rim, and the referee's 
whistle. While these effects are well 
done, there should be more. Where 
are the squeaking sneakers? Where is 
the roar of the crowd when a player 
comes up with a big slam-dunk or a 
long three-pointer? 

Overall, this is a commendable 
effort from Data East. The graphics 
and animation are engaging, the sound 
effects are sparse but good and, most 
important, it's fun to play. So all you 
sports gamers out there — grab a joy- 
stick, lace your sneakers up, and try 
The Dream Team 3 on 3 Challenge. 

RICHARD RAP? 



IBM PC and compatibles; 51 2K RAM for 
CGA. EGA, and Hercules; 640K RAM for 
VGA and Tandy 1 6-coIor; 1 MHz or fast- 
er recommended for VGA or Tandy 
graphics; supports Ad Lib and Sound 
Blaster sound cards; joystick recom- 
mended— $49,95 

DATA EAST USA 
1850 Little Orchard SL 
San Jose, CA 95125 
{408)286-7074 

KING'S QUEST I 

A classic game, King's Quest 
now boasts a new, easier-to-use 
interface that hasn't upset the 
game*s balance. It only enhances 
by eliminating the drudgery of key- 
board control. To find out about an 
object, just point at it and click the 
right mouse button. To move the 
hero. Sir Graham, you merely need to 
click on the desired location, and Gra- 
ham obligingly moves in that direc- 
tion. And while KQ'% graphics are no 
longer state-of-the-art, the soundtrack 
and overall quality of the game are 
still remarkable. In sum — bravo! 
King's Quest has been given a new 
lease on life. 

TOM CAMPBELL 



(BM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM, 
CGA. EGA, VGA; n:>ouse recommend- 
ed— $59.95 

SIERRA ON-LINE 
P.O, Box 485 
Coarsegold. CA 93614 
(800)326-6654 



110 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



ADVENTURE INTO 
A LI\/ING UNiy/ERSE 



•••: 



*i ^, m ^ v)]-^'' ' 



■\V.$| 




TMi pamraM 




.ou ana your comrades will follow a 
path of clues across the adventure- 
filied cosmos on a quest to return 
the Earth to its own space-time 
continuum. Buckle up, lay In your 
course and hang on.. .you've just 
crossed over the PLANETS EDGE! 



BOLEPLfl'"""' 



flDVENT««^' 



HOTTES 



T fiRflPMlC'' * 



SOUNDS 



Available at your local retailer or direct from New World at 
1-800-325-8898 {U.S. and Canada) or at 1-818-999-0607. 

a: copyrighi 1991 Planet's Edge is a trademark of New World Computing. Inc. 
New World Computing is a trademark of Nevy World Computing, inc, 
fBM screens shown, actual screens may vary. 



P.O. Box 4302. Hollywood, CA. 90078 




REVIEWS 



GAMES 



FUTURE CLASSICS 
COLLECriUN 

Arcade lovers will gel a bang out of 
this five-game omnibus. In Disk- 
man you gather floppy disks, 
while avoiding magnets, bombs, 
and other deadly devices. Diet Riot, 
on the other hand, gives you a chance 
to close down junk-food restaurants. 
Don*t eat those hamburgers and 
French fries! You'll get fat. Other 
games include Bhckalanche, a 3-D 
TetrisAike puzzle; Lost 'N Maze, a 
firsi-person-perspective maze treasure 
hunt; and Tank Battle, a simple com- 
bat game. 

While none of the games is con- 
ceptually original, each is cleverly im- 
plemented. Moreover, they boast 
much better graphics than you might 
expect from a budget collection. At 
the price, Future Classics Collection is 
a steal. 

CLAYTON WALNUM 




IBM PC and compatibles. 51 2K RAM, 
CGA, EGA, MCGA, VGA, and Tandy 16- 
color; supports Ad Ub. Sound Blaster 
sound cards; joystick optionai— $39.95 
Also available for Amiga— $49.95 

LIVE STUDIOS 

30151 Branding Iron Rd. 

San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675 

(714)661-8337 

SPACE PST IV: 
ROGER WIlGIl 
THE TIME RIPPERS 

Roger Wilco foils Sludge VohauPs 
plans for revenge by jumping 
into the Time Rip, and the ad- 
venture has just begun. Roger 
won't rest until he's seen Space Quest 
XXII, revisited Space Quest I, and 
stopped briefly at Space Quest X. 

Familiarity with Sierra's line of 
terrific software didn't prepare me for 
the dazzling opener. Stunning 256- 
color MCGA graphics, a soundtrack 
rivaling Hollywood's best, and a well- 
planned introduction to an exciting 
story kept me on the edge of my seat. 
When you play, don't try typing 
Look Around. The parser of old has 



been replaced with a new-generation 
interface* Click the Eye icon in the 
area you want to look, and you're 
given a full report. With the Hand, 
Walking, Nose, and Tongue icons, 
you'll have an easy time figuring out 
what to do. 




You run into some pretty tough 
customers in Space Quest IV. 

The story line is full of surprises. 
When the Latex Babes captured Rog- 
er, I witnessed Roger's former lover 
exacting revenge. And experiencing 
the Skate-0-Rama in the mail, with 
its antigravity instead of skates, re- 
minded me that the Galaxeria Mall, 
after all, was in the middle of deep 
space. One of the biggest surprises is 
meeting Roger's son and seeing a 
hologram of his wife. I won't give 
things away, but youll be in for a 
shock because of his wife's notoriety. 

There are technological twists, 
too. Roger plugs into Vohaul's super- 
computer to fmd the programming 
room for the supercomputer and 
avoid the security detail Once at the 
programming room, he has an oppor- 
tunity to format Vohaul's evil storage 
media. 

If you're a Space Quest fan or you 
just love games that have great graph- 
ics and wonderful sound, get this 
game. It's hard to guess how Sierra 
will follow this act after exposing you 
to the far-flung future of Space Quest 
XXII, but I imagine it will be every bit 
as stimulating as this adventure. 

RICHARD LEINECKER 



IBM PC and compatibles. 640K RAM, 
MCGA or VGA; supports mouse or joy- 
stick, supports Ad Lib, Roland, Game 
Blaster, PS/1, and Sound Blaster sound 
cards-"$59.95 

SIERRA ON-LINE 
P,0. Box 485 
Coarsegold,CA 93614 
(800)326-6654 



LORD OF 



HE 



, VOL. I 



Hobbits are good guys, honest and 
tough, the kind of folks you 
wouldn't mind having next door. 
One of them. Bilbo Baggins, 
found a ring of unimaginable power 
and gave it to his nephew Frodo. Now 
Frodo must destroy the ring, but its 
creator, the dread Sauron, wants it 
back. 

Are these the makings of adven- 
ture? You bet! Author J. R. R. Tolkien 
used these very ingredients to create 
his celebrated fantasy, Lord of the 
Rings. Now Interplay Productions has 
adapted them to the phosphor screen 
with Lord of the Rings, Vol, /, a 
computer-based version of the 
Tolkien classic. 




The denizens of Tolkien's Middle Earth 
come to life in Lord of the Rings. 

Interplay has done a good job of 
equipping you for your quest. You 
move with your mouse (highly recom- 
mended) or keyboard (awkward), and 
the interface is icon-based, allowing 
you to readily procure and use objects, 
cast magic spells, and attack enemies. 
You can recruit some characters to 
help you in your quest and talk with 
others to get information you need. 
Depending on where you are, you can 
acquire new weapons, learn new 
spells, or eat food to restore lost life 
points. You can even put the ring on 
your finger, rendering yourself invisi- 
ble. But be careful if you do; the ring 
drains your will, and if your will falls 
to zero, you are, for all practical pur- 
poses, dead. 

Icons initiate action, and youll 
see plenty of that, but youMl need 
information, too, and information 
comes from written words. Some of 
those words are written on neat little 



112 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



CONQUER 
NINTENDO 




WITH THESE BOOKS 
FROM CQIUIPUTE 



COMPUTEl's Guide to 

Nintendo Games 

Packed with hints and tips for better 
play and dozens of reviews of avail- 
able game cartridges for the Nintendo 
Entertainment System. 
272 pages, $9,95 

COMPUTE'S Nintendo Secrets 

More strategies, hints, tips, reviews, 
and ratings for dozens of the newest, 
most popular Nintendo games. Max- 
out scores on Super Mario Bros. 3, 
Batman, Ninja Gaiden II, and more, 
198 + 8 color pages, $8.95 

Conquering Zelda: 

The Unauthorized Guide 

Finally — the hints and techniques you 

need to conquer two of the most 

popular Nintendo games. The Legend 

of Zelda® and The Adventure ofLink^. 

Step-by-step instructions to rescue the 

princess! 

128 pages, $7.95 



I want more hints 
and tips. Please send me the books 
checked below. 

D COMPUTEi's Gufde to Niitteitdo Games 
(2214) %%.%S 

CQMPUTPs Klntendo Secrets (2346) $8.95 

D Conquering Zelda: The Unauthorized Guide 
(2397) S7.95 



Sales tax (Readents o* NC. NY, & NJ add 
appfDpriate sales tax) Canadian orders add 
7% Goods and Service tax. 

Shipping and Handling $2 per book US: S4 
Canada; S6 foreign. 

TotiJ Enclosed 



n Check or 


money 


order D MC D VISA 


$itfatirP. 










tRequifrt) 


Aotno . 




F^p natP 


Wanrw 






Street Address 






{No PO Sa)«s pleas£j 


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A] I orders must be paid m US funds drawn on a U-S, bank. 
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while supplies last 



MAiL TO Coinpute Doolts 
c/o CCC 

2500 McCieiian Avenue 
Pennsauicen, NJ 08109 



Nintendo and The Legend of Ze!d3 are registered trademarks of Nintendo at Anwica. Snc 
The Aivenuie of Link is a trademark of Nintendo of Anierica, fnc. 



JULY91CG 




REVIEWS 



GAMES 



yellowed scrolls that magically appear 
and then automatically unfurl when- 
ever the need arises. These may, for 
example, give you the lowdown on 
what's in a room. As you explore, the 
ever-helpful scroll also tells you if 
there are desirable items to be found 
wherever you happen to be. It works 
like this: As you enter a room, the 
scroll may pop up and roll down and 
notify you that there are items of in- 
terest nearby. Sure enough, when you 
call up the Get icon, you'll find that 
there are indeed worthwhile objects 
wailing for you, but you'd never know 
it by looking, since there's no visual 
hint. Don't real adventurers always 
depend on their eyes? 

Other words are printed in your 
Lord of the Rings play manual, where 
you'll find 259 numbered blocks of 
text. From time to time, the yellowed 
scroll will prompt you to refer to para- 
graph such and such, and you've got 
to open the manual and locate the 
paragraph. Is this the poor man's text 
adventure? Admittedly, the para- 
graphs add depth to the game, but 
why not just put the information on 
the screen? 

The program has other quirks, 
too. For example, you can pick up 
something useful and then discard it, 
but if you try to pick it up again, it 
may not be there. Another thing that's 
puzzling: Since wearing the ring 
makes you invisible, you'd expect 
your cohorts not to notice you when 
you sHp it on. But even when you 
wear it, they'll still dutifully follow 
you around. 

Another problem lies with the 
scrolling screen itself It's good, not 
great When you move, your character 
stays more or less stationary on the 
screen while the background scrolls 
past. The scroIHng is jerky, and with 
more than 9000 screens worth of Mid- 
dle Earth terrain to explore, eyestrain 
is inevitable. 

How effective is this translation 
of a fantasy classic into the language 
of microprocessors? Tm caught in the 
middle, loving the gameplay but dis- 
appointed by visuals that could never 
live up to those of my imagination. 
Interplay's Middle Earth citizens are 
remarkable in VGA, but some of 
them seem to be a cross between Elvis 
Presley and Mr. Spock. If you're a 
reader of Tolkien, this computer- 
granted glimpse of the land the Hob- 



bits call home may or may not match 
your own mental image, but even if it 
doesn't, don't let that keep you from 
enjoying Interplay's Lord of the Rings. 
Rest assured that those little guys will 
keep you on the road to adventure for 
a long time to come. 

STEVE HUDSON 



IBM PC and compatibles; 51 2K for CGA 
or EGA, 640K for MCGA, VGA, or Tandy 
\6 color; hard disk and mouse recom- 
mended— $54.95 

INTERPLAY PRODUCTIONS 
3710 S. Susan, Ste. 100 
Santa Ana. CA 92704 
(714)549-2411 




Hhen a designer tries to graft 
role-playing onto adventure, 
the result is usually a Franken- 
stein monster of a game that 
returns to haunt the author, the pub- 
lisher, and the game players of the 
world. Hero 's Quest scored high 
marks as one of the few games to suc- 
cessfully blend the puzzle-solving as- 
pects of an adventure with the combat 
and skill elements that characterize 
role-playing games. The sequel, which 
bears a different name due to a trade- 
mark conflict with a board game, is 
even better than the original 




Tightrope waiking in Trial by Fire isn't 
safe, but it certainly is heroic. 

Our hero has traveled from the 
forests of Europe to the burning sands 
of the Mideast for this story. In the de- 
sert city of Shapeir, things have not 
been shaping up according to the sul- 



tan's plan. The emir in the nearby city 
of Raseir has fallen victim to the evil 
plot of his sinister sibling. Your quest 
is to fmd the missing ruler and set 
things right in Raseir before the vil- 
lain takes over Shapeir, too. 

You may use a character from 
Hero 's Quest or roll up a fresh one. As 
before, the choice is fighter, thief, or 
magic user^ — each profession possess- 
ing strengths and shortcomings in 
skills necessary to solve various puz- 
zles. Some puzzles are unique to the 
different classes, and many problems 
have different solutions for each class. 
The fighter, for example, obtains the 
bellows needed to defeat the air ele- 
mental by arm-wrestling the man in 
the weapon shop, while the magic user 
casts Fetch on the bellows (at night) to 
get it. In most places, the magic user 
and thief rely more on wits; the fighter 
on strength. 

1 enjoyed battling the brigands 
and giant scorpions of Trial by Fire 
more than the villains of Hero's 
Quest, because the combat system has 
been revamped and improved. In- 
stead of viewing a first- person picture 
of the foe, you watch animated figures 
of both characters. There are only a 
few combat commands, so they're 
easy to learn and execute. Magic is 
useful in combat as well as when solv- 
ing puzzles. 

As in Hero's Quest, your charac- 
ter can improve certain skills if he or 
she uses them successfully. Pick 
enough locks, and you'll find the next 
lock easier to pick. In a major leap for- 
ward over Hero's Quest, Trial by Fire 
lets your characters advance to higher 
classes; a fighter strives to become a 
paladin, for instance. This gives the 
quest a dual purpose: to save the land 
and to get your character promoted. 
An added feature is a difterent final 
scene for each character class, so you 
have more incentive to replay that 
character, and more fun doing so. 

Trial by Fire supports everything 
from 16-coior VGA to Hercules and 
sound boards that haven't even been 
invented yet, but it doesn't employ 
the ''cinemagraphics" and icon inter- 
face of King's Quest K You still type 
words into a parser to interact with 
people and things, and the graphics 
are cartoonish. This is apppropriate, 
however, considering the abundance 
of humor here. Authors Lori and 
Corey Cole display a rare talent for 



114 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




JUST GOT MEANER! 



Announcing COMPUTE'S 

Mean 18 Course Disk 

Six originally designed, challenging golf courses 
to add to your Mean 18 collection. Each course 
has a unique theme. Play Apple Arbor, a genu- 
ine test of strategy; Pines Par 3, a fast-play 
course for which you'll need all your clubs; City 
Lakes, where water is your best friend and 
worst enemy; Island Green, which requires pre- 
cise distance calculations and deadly accuracy; 
and much, much more. 

ThB disk is designed to v^xK with Accolade's Mamt 18. The Mean 78 program is sotd 
separately. 

Mean 18 Ultimate Golf is a trademark and copyright of Acoslade, Jnc, 1986, 1987, 1988, 
1989. 1990. 



► Only $12.95* plus $2.00 postage and 
handling. 

► Available in IBM 5y4- or SVa-inch formats or 
in Amiga format 

► Send your order to GOLF, 324 West 
Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. Be sure to specify 
format desired. 

' Residents of Nevv York and North Carolhia add appropriate sales tax. Canadiah or- 
ders, add 7% goods and services lax. All orders must be in US. funds drawn on a U.S. 
tjank. MasterCard Of VISA accepted (or orders over 520. Include credit card nurrvtser and 
expiration date. For delivery outside the U.S. or Canada, add $1 for surface mail or $3 
tof airmaiJ. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 



The Mother of 
All Scenario 
Disks. . . 

Experience the excite- 
ment and danger of the 
Persian Gulf War with the 
Operation Desert Storm 
Scenario Disk for F- 15 
Strike Eogie //. 
Includes: • Eight 
historicaiiy- based 
^k missions drawn from 
'T^* actuoi war events • 
^^ Hundreds of random 
^^^ missions based on 
coaiition strategies 
and objectives • North Cape 
and Central Europe theatres from F-19Stealft) 
Figliter • New, night-combat capability and 
much more! 

f- 75 Strike Eagle II required to play. 

' E N T E rj r A I N r.i E N 1 . s O ? r A' A D E 

180 Laketront Drive • Hunt Valley, MD 21030 • (301) 771-1151 





■^^^^ 



Circfe Reader Service Number 142 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 

COMPUTE Offers fwo different disk 
products for PC readers: the 
SharePak disk and PC Disk. SharePak 
is monthiy and has a subscription 
price of $59.96 for 5^^-inch disks 
and $64.95 for 3y2-inch disks. A 
subscription to SharePak does not 
include a subscription to the maga- 
zine. PC Disk appears In even- 
numbered months and has a sub- 
scription price of $49.95, which 
includes a subscription to the PC 
edition of COMPUTE. You can sub- 
scribe to either disk or to both, but a 
subscription to one does not include 
a subscription to the other. 



REVIEWS 



GAMES 



demented puns and obscure jokes. The weapon shop, for 
instance, is run by a man called Issur, a play on A, E. van 
Vogt's classic novel. The Weapon Shops oflsher. For its 
playfulness and improvements over the original, Trial by 
Fire is highly recommended. 

SHAY ADDAMS 



IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM. CGA, EGA, MCGA, VGA, or 
Hercules; 8 MHz or higher recommended, supports Roland MT-32, 
Ad Lib. Sound Blaster, PS/1 Audio Joystick Adapter, and ottier mu- 
sic synttiesizers— $59.95 

SIERRA ON-LINE 
P.O. BOX 485 
Coarsegold.CA 93614 
(800)326-6654 



ZBIUD 



I 



don't like sword-and-sorcery games, but twenty min- 
utes after beginning Zeliard, I took the phone off the 
hook and put my rudest Do Not Disturb sign on the 
front door. 




You come across a mountain fortress in Zeltard. 

A Japanese import from Sierra's Game Arts division, 
Zeliard is a well-crafted, entertaining hack-and-grab fanta- 
sy adventure. As Duke Garland, you must search for the 
Tears of Esmemanti, nine crystals that are the only de- 
fense against the demon Jashiin, who has laid waste the 
land and turned the princess into stone. Your quest takes 
you through caverns where you do battle with evil frogs, 
slugs J owls, fire-spitting serpents, and the inevitable giant 
monsters. Along the way, you have the chance to buy bet- 
ter weapons and increase your strength and endurance, 
and if you persevere to the end, you'll restore the land of 
Zeliard to its former happy state. OK, you've heard it all 
before, but Zeliard s familiar premise profits immensely 
from detailed graphics (even on CGA), Hmited but clever 
animation, satisfyingly convoluted labyrinths, and an 
original musical score that, for a wonder, is pleasant to lis- 
ten to. 

Not that there aren't problems: On slower systems 
the lags during screen changes may be infuriatingly 



116 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




REVIEWS 



GAMES 



slow, playing the game without a hard drive will involve 
frequent disk swapping (three 5V4S, two 3 '/2s), and after 
several deaths, you'll wish it were possible to save a game 
without leaving the cavern to go to the Sage's house in the 
village. Bui the first two problems are probably signs that 
it's time to upgrade your system, and the last problem will 
at least keep you on your toes. On the whole, the obvious 
care that went into the creation of Zeliard makes playing 
the game a lot of high-quaUty unsophisticated fun. 

ANTHONY MOSES 



IBM PC and compatibles. 51 2K RAM. CGA, EGA, MCGA, Tandy 
16-color, or Hercules; hard drive recommended — $34,95 

SIERRA ON-LINE 
P.O. Box 485 
Coarsegold, CA 93614 
(209) 683-4468 




II: 




AT 



Have you ever wanted to fight a battle in a war game 
that hasn't been developed yet? Have you ever won- 
dered what would have happened had Napoleon 
faced Alexander the Great in battle in the twenty-first 
centur>' with nuclear weapons, missiles, and air power? 
This capability is what Ezra Sidran and the stafTof Inter- 
galactic Development have programmed into their new 
Microplay release, UMS II: Nations at War. 

VMS II is a computer war game simulation which 
purports to have real artificial intelligence and a depth of 
simulation not yet realized in any other war game. This 
may or may not be true, but UMS H certainly does have 
complex algorithms that define thousands of variables in- 
cluding leadership, morale, supply level, experience, effi- 
ciency, and unit strength. The game player can set and 
reset these values to study the effects of a variety of com- 
bat circumstances. Terrain, weather, elevation, and mili- 
tary formations must also be taken into account. For the 
realist, these are welcome details, 

UMS II has the further advantage of being a game 
system that promises the imminent release of a planet edi- 
tor that will allow you to create your own plane twide bat- 
tles. While the editor doesn't come with the game, it's 
easily the most appealing aspect of UMS IL Expect the 
editor to be available within the next two months, though 
there is some confusion as to whether the planet editor 
will be a free upgrade to the original program. Unlike its 
predecessor, UMS, UMS U transcends the limitations of a 
mundane, geographically limited battlefield and engages 
you in planetwide conflicts instead. 

Obviously, UMS II targets the true war gamer who 
has hours of time to pore over manuals and to enjoy and 
master the intricacies of gameplay, not the average gamer. 
Even when you use one of the three enclosed scenarios, 
the game isn*t an undertaking for a few afternoon hours. 
Schedule a whole day or night to complete a single game. 

Functioning better with a mouse than a keyboard, the 
interface is adequate, but not obvious or easy to learn. Ex- 



'27 Yanks vs. 90 Reds. 

Tonight. 

OnlyOnMLSPN. 

(YOUR MICROLEAGUE SPORTS NETWORK) 




Tune in to MicroLeague Basebal!-The Manager's Challenge-new 
from MicroLeague Sports, your Computer Network for the finest in 
true-to-life sports simulation software- You control all the action- 
for all aspects of the game. Manage 26 major league rosters-past 
and present. How would the '27 Yanks do against the '90 Reds? 
Could the Mets beat Boston again? Find out. You get graphic dis- 
plays of 3 big league stadiums (other stadium disks available), 30- 
player rosters, complete stats and box scores, Stat Compiler for 
season and league play Quick-Series option, Quick-Play option, 
and much more -p/f/s; 

• GM/Owner disk for making trades- 
or create your Dream Team. 

• Season disks available. 

• Pitch & hit vs. Lefty or Eighty. 

• Stealing & base running. 

• Pull, spray, or hit straight away 

• Fatigue and power factors. 

• Season tiring for league play 

• Full-colorAction 3-D Graphics. 

For: IBM/Tandy/Compatibles 39.95. 
Coming soon for Macintosh & Amiga, 
Cant find MLB-MC at your local retailer? 
Call, or mail check/money order to: 
Microt^agLie Sports Associates 
2201 Drummond ?\z., Newarl<, DE 19711 

1-800-334-MLSA 





The Superstars m Sportb Simuutions. 



Watch for /VfW MicroLeague Baseball— the book- coming this 
spring from Bantam Books. It's loaded with Scouting Reports 
on over 1000 players, plus FREE SOFTWARE ! 

;c: 1991, MiiCroLeagsje Spois. Referenced products and companies aie resistered tradeniarks of tlieif respective holders 



Ctrde Reader Service Number 124 
JULY 1991 COMPUTE 117 




REVIEWS 



GAMES 



pact to make many mistakes, and 
don't expect the manual to answer all 
your questions: The documentation is 
not quite sufTicient. To make up for 
this problem, the designers provide a 
free newsletter, complete with tips 
and warnings against pitfalls. 

Offering no sound effects and 
possessing limited color graphics , 
VMS 11 has sacrificed glitz to afford 
players greater control of the simula- 
tion. When designing the artificial in- 
telligence of generals, for example, 
you decide whether they're passive or 
aggressive, or desire the destruction of 
opposing forces over the conquest of 
territory. But if you're looking for a 
stereo shoot-'em-up, this is not your 
game. Only the highly cerebral need 
look into this military simulator. The 
current version of VMS II is version 
1 .2.4. You need to send your original 
game disks and registration card to In- 
tergalactic Development to get the up- 
grade. This new version improves on 
the earlier version and addresses 
many user complaints. The newer 
version runs faster and is far more 
capable of unattended play than the 
prior game. Lengthy battles need trou- 
ble you no longer; array your forces 
and let the game resolve the combat 
while you clean the garage or make a 
sandwich. Upon your return, view the 
results and issue another set of 
commands. 

VMS II: Nations at War is by far 
the most monumental and ambitious 
undertaking in military war game his- 
tory. Be aware of the drawbacks of the 
system, however, and remember that 
this game is not for everyone, I would 
recommend VMS II for anyone who 
intends to purchase the planet editor 
(assuming the upgrade isn't free) and 
who is an avid war gamer — or per- 
haps for anyone who enjoys alternate 
history or wants to set his or her own 
conditions for worldwide conflict 
without actual bloodshed. 

ALFRED GIOVETTI 



IBM PC and compatibles, 640K RAM, 
CGAor EGA, hard drive— $59.95 
Also available for Amiga — $59.95, Atari 
ST— $59.95, and Macintosh— $59.95 

MICROPLAY 

Distributed by MicroProse Software 

leOLakefrontDr. 

HuntValley.MD 21030 

(301)771-9150 



njODniTY 

MBNSiin ma. 

If there's one immutable law in per- 
sonal computing, it's this: For any 
hardware platform or operating sys- 
tem to succeed, it must be the deliv- 
ery system for a killer spreadsheet. 
This may sound strange, but if you 
look at history, you'll see that it's true. 




The new Exce/'s toolbar makes the 
program faster and easier to use. 

When VisiCak hit the scene in 
1 979, it turned the Apple II from a toy 
into a powerful business tool Apple II 
sales skyrocketed, and the machine 
became the personal computer for 
computing's first generation. Lotus I- 
2-3 was the next standard. It was a 
great improvement on VisiCak and 
the epitome of user-friendly software 
in 1983. Lotus J -2-3 made business- 
men and -women really want to buy 
MS-DOS-based, 8088-powered PCs. 
And they did . , . by the millions. 

Since 1-2-3'% success, there have 
been many spreadsheet contenders, 
but none have really captured the 
computing public's imagination and 
driven users to a new hardware or 
operating-system platform. 

Lotus tried recapturing the magic 
and setting a new standard with /-2-i 
3.0, but without much success — most 
users who upgraded went with the 
lower-end 2.2 version of 1-2-3. And 
Microsoft has tried before with Excel 
1 .0 and 2.0, but previous versions of 
Excel simply didn't have the wiles to 
lure people away from the comfort of 
DOS, 1-2-3, and their 8088s. 



Now we have Excel 3.0. Is it just 
another also-ran, or is it the spread- 
sheet to set a new standard and fuel 
the blastoff of Windows 3.0 and the 
386 hardware it demands? 

Keep reading. In the next five 
minutes, you'll find out. 

First, don't let anything you've 
heard about previous versions of Ex- 
cel influence you. Version 3.0 has 
been completely redesigned from the 
ground up. Not only does Excel 3.0 
have amazing new features and pow- 
er, but Microsoft has made dramatic 
strides in making the program easier 
to use. 

Right off the bat, you'll notice 
that the new Excel looks different. 
When you run it for the first time, 
you'll see one of its most impressive 
new features, the toolbar. The toolbar 
is a horizontal bar that rests under the 
menus and contains groups of push 
buttons. These push buttons are short- 
cuts for commonly used commands, 
the mouse equivalent of accelerator 
keys, and they make using Excel both 
easier and faster. 

The toolbar isn't a new idea. It's 
borrowed from Microsoft Word for 
Windows, which places often-used 
word-processing commands on a bar 
called the ribbon. But the toolbar con- 
cept seems even more of a natural for 
a spreadsheet than a word processor. 

You can easily get a feel for 
what's new with Excel by looking at 
what's on the toolbar. Going from left 
to right, you'll see buttons for select- 
ing styles, promoting and demoting 
outline elements, toggling outline dis- 
play on and off, selecting visible cells, 
autosumming (which automatically 
sums rows or columns), bold and ital- 
ic, alignment (left, center, and right), 
selecting gmphics objects, drawing (in- 
cluding buttons for drawing lines, rec- 
tangles, ellipses, and curves), auto- 
charting, creating text boxes, creating 
your own user-defined buttons, and 
recording macros. 

One of these buttons, autosum, is 
especially useful. Microsoft did some 
impressive research to determine just 
what users wanted and needed in a 
spreadsheet. One of the things the re- 
search showed was that summing 
rows and columns was the most re- 
peated task for almost all spreadsheet 
users. 

To make summing as easy as 
possible, Microsoft created autosum. > 



lie COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



END BAIDNESS AND THINNING HAIR 




"TO EVERY liAAN LOSING HAIR'' 

In announcing Hair Dynasty, I said: 

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hair replacement! It shall be constructed of 
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the latest, most modern technology! The 
result shall be a hair-replacement system 
that is permanent and totally undetectable 
to those around you— regardless of the 
circumstances! No man has to accept 
being bald anymore!" 
Daniel R. Trimper, President of Hair 
Dynasty For Men 







IMPROVE YOUR 
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Right now you could 
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years younger without the 
use of dangerous drugs, 
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REVIEWS 



PRODUCTIVITY 



To use it, you place Ihe cursor at the 
end of any row or column at the point 
where you want your total to go. Next, 
click on the autosum button. The pro- 
gram places the SUM formula in the 
current cell and selects a range based 
on the configuration of your data. If 
autosum finds cells filled in to the 
right or left of your sum cell, it 
chooses that part of the row. If it finds 
cells above the formula (the more 
common situation), it selects the col- 
umn above. I*ve found that autosum 
almost always chooses the right range 
for the sum, but when it doesn't, it's 
easy to compress or extend the selec- 
tion or to move it somewhere else on 
the work sheet 




You can control both the color and 
perspective of Excei's 3-D charts. 

Autosum may be Excei's most 
frequently used new feature, but it*s 
just one example of the care that went 
into the design of 3-0. Another 
thoughtful extra is Excei's new auto- 
matic best fit for column width. To 
use this, place the pointer between any 
two cells and double-clicL The pro- 
gram adjusts the width of the column 
on the left and makes a best fit for the 
data therein. Resizing your spread- 
sheet's columns for optimum width is 
now easy — and it's almost fun. 

When you need to take a quick 
look at a note attached to a cell, you 
don't want to have to navigate 
through menus. With 3.0, all you have 
to do is double-click on any cell that 
contains a note (cells with notes are 
identified by a small red dot in the up- 
per right corner of the cell) to display 
the note's text. 

When it's time to print your 
spreadsheet, you1l be pleased to find 
that this new version of Excel knows 
all about fonts. Version 2.0 was limit- 
ed to four fonts per work sheet, but 
3.0 gives you unlimited access to your 



system's entire font arsenal. It's also 
worth noting that Excel works flaw- 
lessly with both Bitstream's Eacelift 
and Adobe Type Manager font 
packages. 

To top off new output enhance- 
ments, 3.0 now offers style control. 
You can access styles with the style 
combo box on the toolbar, just like 
the style box on the Word for Win- 
dows ribbon. To define a style, select 
an area of your work sheet and formal 
it with the font you want (you can 
specify bold, italic, underline, or 
strikeout) and its point size. Click on 
the style box and type in the name for 
your new style. Now the style appears 
on your style combo box menu. Fonts 
and style control are a double-edged 
sword, however. If you want to keep 
your spreadsheets from looking like 
ransom notes, stick to Helvetica for 
numbers and perhaps one sen fed 
font — like Times or Bookman — for 
headlines. 

All the features mentioned so far 
make Excel faster and easier to use, 
but this version also has several new 
tricks to make power users' mouths 
water. At the top of the list is outlin- 
ing. With it, you can structure your 
spreadsheet in an interrelated hierar- 
chy, and even more important, you 
can display selected parts of the 
spreadsheet based on that hierarchy. 

Here's a quick look at how out- 
lining works. Let's say, for example, 
that you're working on a balance sheet 
containing several subtotals, and each 
is the sum of 50 to 100 numbers. The 
work sheet to contain all these num- 
bers could easily be 400-500 rows 
long. With a length like that, it would 
be nearly impossible to see the impor- 
tant data. The trees would block the 
forest. 

With outlining, the solution is 
simple. First, select the range of the 
rows that comprise each subtotal and 
demote them with the right-pointing 
arrow on the toolbar. You'll see a 
small button with a minus sign on it 
and a line indicating the range of the 
button. Click on the button (which 
will change to a +), and the range will 
be hidden. If you click on the + but- 
ton again, your range will appear. If 
you change your mind and want to 
promote the cells you demoted earlier, 
just select the range again and click on 
the left-pointing arrow on the toolbar. 
The small outline button with the mi- 



nus sign in it will disappear. 

If you have several outline levels 
in your spreadsheet, you'll appreciate 
the program's outline display button, 
also on the toolbar. Press this, and the 
outline buttons disappear. When 
you're ready to work with outlining 
again, press the outhne display but- 
ton, and you'll see your outline levels 
and their associated buttons. 

The toolbar, autosumming, and 
outlining are all great, but Excel has a 
little something extra for the kid in all 
of us — dazzling, eye-popping graph- 
ics. You'll find all the standard (and 
often boring) graphs supplied, but 
you'll also find gorgeous 3-D area, col- 
umn, line, and pie charts. With all 




Wrth ExceVs new drawing tools, you can 
fine-tune your spreadsheets. 

graph types, you have complete con- 
trol over the chart's rotation, perspec- 
tive, and color. You can also 
incorporate graphs right in your 
spreadsheet. It's easy, and as you 
might expect, you do it with the 
toolbar. 

To create a graph, select a range 
of cells, click on the graph button on 
the toolbar, and draw a box on your 
work sheet (by clicking and dragging 
the mouse) just where you want the 
graph to go. 

If you have the soul of an artist, 
you can even use Excei's on-board 
drawing tools to jazz up your chart 
and make your point in style. 

Last, there's Excei's database. 
This is the only module in the pro- 
gram not completely redesigned and 
upgraded for release 3.0, and it does 
show its age a little. Microsoft, howev- 
er, has solved the database problem 
by bundling Pioneer software's Q-hE 
database with Excel. 

Q+E has been billed as a data- 
base editor, but it's much more than 
that. With it, you can import files (Ex- 



120 COMPUTE 



JULY 19 9 1 




REVIEWS 



PRODUCTIVITY 



eel, dBase, and text), edit ihem, and 
perform SQL queries. You can also 
create databases in Q+E. The whole 
affair is wrapped in a MDI (Multiple 
Document Interface), like Excels 
own, that features multiple overlap- 
ping windows. Q+E is an impressive 
and useful database program in its 
own right. Match it up with Excel and 
DDE, Windows' Dynamic Data Ex- 
change, and it's a real winner. 

So, is Excel the one? The new 
spreadsheet standard that's going to 
propel us into the next generation of 
hardware and operating systems? It is 
indeed. It's the spreadsheet we've 
been waiting for. 

CLIFTON KARNES 



IBM PC and compatibles, Microsoft Win- 
dows 3.0— S495 

MICROSOFT 
One Microsoft Way 
Redmond, WA 98052 
(800)426-9400 



COREIDRAW! 

nrdinarily, I would be wary of rec- 
ommending a graphics package 
that costs as much as Corel- 
DRAWL If it costs thai much, it 
had better do it all After working with 
CorelDRAW! intensively for about a 
year and with Corel DR/iW! 2.0 virtu- 
ally full-time since January in connec- 
tion with a book project, I can tell you 
without hesitation or fear of contra- 
diction that CorelDR.4W! mil do the 
job for you as far as graphics are con- 
cerned, almost without regard to the 
kind of job you need done. If you've 
outgrown Corel's list of options, you 
have simply outgrown the PC, and 
you should be shopping for a 
workstation. 

I would've had a more difficult 
time making that recommendation 
prior to the emergence of the 2.0 ver- 
sion (which may be updated to a high- 
er number by the time you see this, to 



account for minor bug fixes that are 
underway as of this writing). Although 
the earlier version was a noble effort 
and certainly a heavy hitter among 
graphics packages, there was nothing 
that sufficiently distinguished it from 
the pack of other CAD programs to 
make a specific recommendation. 
Each of the major players had a spe- 
cial trick or two, and there was as 
much compelling evidence that you 
should purchase one as another. Cor- 
el's programmers eliminated all the 
waffle room with version 2,0, beating 
the competition at its own game and 
leaving it in the dust. The cleaned-up 
version that will shortly emerge from 
the current upgrade process will be 
bulletproof, 

I will attempt the daunting task 
of listing the reasons why you should 
invest $695 in a graphics program — 
and why you will count that invest- 
ment as money well spent. 

CorelDRAW! is easy to learn and 
use, as it always was. It features intu- 



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JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 121 




REVIEWS 



PRODUCTIVITY 



itive little pluses like a Repeat com- 
mand in the File menu that allows 
you to reiterate an action, no matter 
how complex, with a single menu se- 
lection. It allows you to add perspec- 
tive to your drawing automatically, to 
"extrude" a two-dimensional object 
into the third dimension, and to dis- 
tort at will the envelope containing a 
drawn object as if it were printed on a 
sheet of rubber or Silly Putty. Corel- 
DRAW! has a complete blend option 
for the first time with version 2.0. It 
features a broad range of import and 
export features that will make it a 
ready partner for all your other graph- 
ics software. The CorelDRAW! fonts 
are famous for their variety and at- 
tractiveness, but they offer much 
more: These fine fonts can be export- 
ed in various forms for use with your 
other applications, provided that you 
have a font manager to work with 
Windows, 

The Mosaic feature turns your 
CorelDRAW! on-disk graphics portfo- 
lio into an onscreen gallery of draw- 
ings that you can peruse at will, 
looking for the specific piece of art 
that you need at the moment. But 
even if you opt not to use Mosaic for 
whatever reason, the Open dialog box 
displays a thumbnail sketch of what- 
ever file is selected in the list box, pro- 
viding a similar, if less dramatic, 
service in the basic software. 

New in CorelDRAW! 2.0 are the 
vector and raster fill options. These 
options provide you with the ability, 
for example, to grab a section of a 
drawing on the screen and use it as a 
continuously tiling fill inside of anoth- 
er object. You can also import any bit- 
map (TIFF or PCX) drawing as a fill 
pattern. Once the fill has been import- 
ed, you can color it as you please, size 
it, edit it with Corel's pattern editor, 
and save it for future use in the gallery 
of raster fills or, if it's a vector fill, as a 
special kind of CorelDRAW! fill file. 

One of the drawbacks of the earli- 
er versions of the product was that 
you couldn't offset a fountain fill. A 
fountain fill was always squarely cen- 
tered in the selection rectangle of an 
object, and the only way you could al- 
ter the way it filled was to combine 
the filled object with some irrelevant 
bit of data off in the direction of the 
desired offset. This minor irritant was 
removed in the 2.0 version with the 
addition of an offset option. 



In many ways, CorelDRAW! was 
always just as good as its principal ri- 
vals, Micrografx Designer and Arts d 
Letters Graphic Editor, but it lacked 
the friendly fountains of Designer and 
the powerful blending options of 
Graphic Editor. 

There are still areas that could 



■M 




■■■■i 


jZ/^^^Kh 


%^^^^ 


i«^ 


^ 



Both intuitive and powerful, CorelDRAW! is 
the premier paint pmgram for Windows, 

use improvement. The powerful Corel 
TRACE, an associated program pro- 
vided with CorelDRAW!, is functional 
enough when it comes to turning ras- 
ter graphics into line art, but its op- 
tions aren't particularly intuitive, and 
it seems slow, particularly when com- 
pared with the spritely performance of 
Designer, Corel also has an autotrace 
feature within the program. Someday 
it would be nice to have this autotrace 
made powerful enough to stand up 
next to Designer's so you wouldn't 
have to leave the program to perform 
your traces. Likewise, the font-export 
option is the envy of the industry, but 
for a novice at moving fonts around, 
it's not well documented (and the 
information in the Windows 3.0 man- 
ual is as good as nonexistent). The 
ability to alter fonts and use them as 
your own is another good reason to 
purchase CorelDRAW!, but you'll 
have to become a Windows expert 
before you'll discover how to use 
these fonts with other Windows 
programs. 

But even with these minor prob- 
lems, CorelDRAW! has more to rec- 
ommend it than any other Windows 
graphics program. 

ROBERT BIX BY 



IBM PC and cwinpatbles, Microsoft Win- 
dows 3.0— $695 

COREL SYSTEMS 
1600 Calling Ave. 
Ottawa. ON 
Canada K1Z8R7 
(613)728-8200 



WILLMAKER 

Nobody enjoys making a will and 
keeping it current, but everybody 
knows that the chore must be 
done for the sake of loved ones. 
One way to do it is to visit a lawyer. 
That places some demands on your 
time and checkbook. A more conven- 
ient and inexpensive method is pro- 
vided in WillMaker 4.0. 

WillMaker 4.0 comes from Nolo 
Press, a company well known for its 
authoritative books on legal matters 
for lay people. The manual states that 
in the past 50 years the legal profes- 
sion has scored a public relations coup 
by convincing many people that writ- 
ing a will without a lawyer is like do- 
ing your own brain surgery. This, the 
authors insist, is nonsense. Their pro- 
gram produces a will which you can 
understand, in clear language without 
jargon such as "I hereby give, be- 
queath, and devise." And it's a will 
that will stand up in court. 

After a simple installation pro- 
cess, WillMaker takes you through a 
series of questions regarding the allo- 
cation of your estate. When you type 
an answer, a window shows you how 
your answer will appear in your will 
and seeks your approval. 

Let's say you are married and 
wish to leave everything to your 
spouse and your children. A will 
meeting these conditions can be com- 
pleted in a very few minutes. The pro- 
gram asks for your name, your social 
security number, your state and coun- 
ty of residence, and the names of your 
children. The program prompts you 
for the name of a contingency custodi- 
an for any beneficiaries who are mi- 
nors, and suggestions for alternate 
forms of custodianship are given. 

If your will is more complicated 
and you have specific bequests, the 
program makes provision for those. It 
also cautions you about what you can- 
not do in a will with provisional be- 
quests. For example, you cannot leave 
something to Uncle Bill provided that 
he quits smoking. Such a bequest 
would probably be set aside by a pro- 
bate court. 

When you have fmished the se- 
quence of screens, you may review the 
finished document, make alterations 
to your answers if you wish, and print 
the will, which makes provision for 



122 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




REVIEWS 



PRODUCTIVITY 



the signatures of three witnesses, plus 
their initials, on each page. The print- 
out also produces a "self-proving" af- 
fidavit. Nolo urges you to complete 
this document, which must have the 
notarized signatures of yourself and 
your witnesses. In most states, its exis- 
tence will make it unnecessary for 
your witnesses to appear in probate 
court. 

Documents produced by IVill- 
Maker^re state specific, taking into 
account variations in stale laws. The 
manual asserts that the documents are 
valid in all states except Louisiana, 
where laws are based upon the French 
legal system. The manual contains far 
more information than just instruc- 
tions for the use of the program. It 
points out the limitations of a will, 
provides information about the pro- 
bate process, and discusses action you 
may wish to take, outside your will, to 
avoid probate. It also discusses situa- 
tions which a simple will cannot cover 
and suggests steps you may wish to 
take to avoid estate taxes if your estate 
is substantial. It even suggests that 
there are circumstances under which 
you may wish to consult a lawyer. 

WillMaker 4.0 is an excellent 
program and deserves your consider- 
ation for use in matters of estate. Ask 
yourself these questions: Is your will 
up to date? Are you sure? WillMaker 
4.0 offers some peace of mind. 

CHARLES IDOL 



IBM PC and compatibles, 256K RAM. 
5y4- or 3V2-inch floppy drive; supports 
hard drive— S69.95 

NOUO PRESS 
950 Parker St, 
Berkeley, CA 94710-25^ 
(415)549-1976 



LAPTOP 
COLLECTION 

Iaptop software can unfortunately 
be a bit like microwave meals — 
convenient, but less substantial 
and satisfying than conventional 
fare. If you've longed to beef up your 
laptop menu, now's the time. That 
longtime favorite of touch-typists, 
WordStar, is now available in a laptop 



version you can really sink your teeth 
into — WordStar Laptop CoUection, 

The collection gives you basically 
a modified version 6.0 along with 
LapLink Special Edition, which facili- 
tates transfers between your laptop 
and desktop (the cable costs extra), 
and OnTime, a flexible calendar pro- 




Take touch-typing power on the road 
with WordStar Laptop Cof/ect/on. 

gram. Although you don't have every 
single feature offered in the desktop 
version, there's still plenty to work 
with: a spelling dictionary, a thesau- 
rus, a definitions dictionary, multiple 
help levels, pull-down or classic 
menus, an extra-window capability, 
dot commands, word counts, headers, 
footers, an advanced page preview, 
abundant printer support, and much 
more. (For a fuller discussion of basic 
program features in version 6.0, see 
the December 1990 COMPUTE 
review,) 

In using the program, I haven't 
felt that I lacked any features neces- 
sary for normal laptop use. WordStar 
seems every bit as full-featured on the 
laptop as it does on my desktop com- 
puter. In addition to the program 
proper, you get WordStar's MailList 
program for generating form letters, 
printing labels or envelopes, and cre- 
ating mailing lists. You also get a 
quite capable communications pro- 
gram, TelMerge, which lets you access 
online services, send or receive elec- 
tronic mail, and communicate with 
other computers. Conveniently, each 
of these programs is accessible from 
within WordStar. 

Like the desktop version, Word- 
Star Laptop Collection offers free 
membership in CompuServe with $ 1 5 
usage credit, free Bitstream typefaces, 
and free Agfa typefaces. 

What's missing from the original 
6.0 version? You don't get integrated 



text and graphics, PC-Outline, Pro- 
finder {a shell program), and Star- 
Exchange (which converts file 
formats between this and several oth- 
er word processors). Once you be- 
come a registered user of the laptop 
edition, however, you qualify to buy 
the desktop version for a mere $99. 
And as the company points out, that's 
like getting both products for less than 
the retail price of the desktop ver- 
sion — quite a bargain. 

While you'll enjoy many of the 
desktop version's features in the lap- 
top edition, the company has clearly 
adapted the program with the laptop 
user in mind. The README file, the 
installation and customization pro- 
gram, and the manuals all reflect that 
a laptop is being used. And yes, you 
can run the program on a floppy sys- 
tem. WordStar supplies a quick-start 
disk with a condensed version of the 
program, and you also get tips on 
installing the program on a high- 
capacity disk. 

If youVe been waiting for a full- 
featured word processor for your lap- 
top, this is a great one. And if you've 
enjoyed WordStar on a desktop com- 
puter, this new laptop edition might 
be just the excuse you need to buy a 
laptop. 

MIKE HUDNALL 



IBM PC and compatibles; 640K RAM; 
CGA, EGA, VGA; two floppy drives or sin- 
gle ftoppy and a hard drive— $295 
Registered WordStar users— $89 

WORDSTAR INTERNATIONAL 
201 A!ameda del Prado 
Novato, CA 94948 
(415)382-0606 

ARTBEATS FULL 



If you're serious about desktop pub- 
lishing and your system can handle 
PostScript files, you'll love these 
versatile full-page graphics. Each 
design is a textured background that 
can add a professional touch to a vari- 
ety of documents. You can stretch 
them, crop them, or use them as bor- 
ders, blocks, or bands. 

Artbeats offers five different 
packages: Dimensions 1 & 2, Natural 
Images 1 & 2, and Potpourri L Each 
package contains light and dark ver- 



J U L V 19 9 1 



COMPUTE 



123 



CALL TOLL FREE 24 HRS. 7 DAYS 1-800-5 6 5-849 3 




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easy totmg. Perfect for home, office, auto, ^ 
sporting events, theatres, wheel chairs— or 
anywhere your tush ' needs a "cush'ioni $39.98 (S5.00) M1967. 




T CUTLERY: A CUT ABOVE THE REST 

The secret behind Regent 
Sheffield's new Laser 
2000's cutlery is the unique 
machined edge guaranteed to 
stay super sharp for 25 years 
— without sharpening! The 
result is a knife so sharp and 
durable that it comes with an 
unmatched guarantee If a 
Laser 2000 knife ever dulls, 
chips, rusts, or breaks during 
the next 25 years, Regent 
Sheffield will replace it FREE! 
Plus, the Laser 2000's blades 
have a unique nonstick Xylan 
coating, so slicing even hard 
vegetables is a snap And 
clean-up is a cinch because 

food doesn't stick to the blades, Unbreakable, dishwasher- 
safe handles are contoured to fit your hand comfortably 
A lovely sleek wood block holds the entire 5 piece set: bread 
knifes can/ing knife cook's knife, utility knife, and paring knife 
$129.98 (S7.00) #A1955. 



? BACK SUPPORT THAT HITS THE SPOT 

A soft, cushiony sofa, as inviting as it is to some, 
can spell agony to a back-pain sufferer. As can 
office chairs, car, plane or train seats — even or- 
dinary bed-rest pillows A firm back support is 
often the answer, but WHY, you ask, does the 
curve always hit the wrong spot on MY back';^ This 
support, developed in cooperation with leading 
orthopedic physicians, fea- 
tures an internal roller bar 
that, with a simple twist, 
adjusts to nine positions, 
one perfect for your 
spine! The roller bar 
serves to shape five 

verticalribs of spring steel — for very effective support. 
More features: comfortable foam padding, durable plas- 
tic frame and washable cover, plus convenient side zip 
to enable roller adjustment, velcro* closed straps for cer- 
tain chairs and handy carrying tote. Just 2 lbs., 12"x17" 
- truly a back's best friend $34.98 (S6.00) #A1888X. 






U^^ L 



T OMNIVAC^ : POWERFUL, PORTABLE, & PRICED TO PLEASE! 




TheOmnivac- by Metro® is the portable canister 
vacuum cleaner/bfower tinat simplv biows awav 
the competition. So compact (17 inches x 7 inches) 
and weighing only 11 pounds, it is a homemaker's 
dream. But dont let the compact size and portabili- 
ty fool you' The Omni vac- features an all-steel body 
and packs a f ut! 4.0 peak h.p 2-speed motor for incre- 
dible suction and deep cleaning power that is far su- 
perior to most ordinary vacuums. The turbo-driven 
powerhead attachment features a high speed rotat- 
ing brush that removes ground-in carpet dirt as ef- 
fectively as bulkv upright models, Plus, its double swiv- 
el neck gets into tight spots under furniture and in 
corners. But it doesn't stop herei A reversible air blow- 
er provides 200 mph power for sweeping garages, pa- 
tios, and walkways— and it inflates inflatables too The 
Omnivac* can be carried easily over your shoulder 
with the comfortable shoulder strap or it can roll 
along effortlessly on its swivel caster wheels. The full- 
featured 10-piece accessory kit comes with a 6 foot 
hose 2 extension wands, bi-turbo powerhead, nozzle, 
crevice tool, dust brush, floor/wall brush, inflator, 
powenzer and shoulder strap UL approved and made 
in the USA. And ... as if the Omnivac' weren't 
enough, we are pleased to offer ABSOLUTELY FREE 
with your order, the Vac 'N' Go, (a S40 value) the high 

performance Vi horsepower electric hand 
vacuum, ideal for quick clean-ups around 
the house, office, workshop, or in the car, 
RV, or boat, Includes 110 volt power unit and 
Pik-all nozzle Omnivac- attachments will 
also fit the Vac 'N' Co Full one year war- 
ranty TWO GREAT VACUUMS - FOR ONE 
LOW PRICE! Who can resist an offer like 
this??? $199.98 (S20.0Q) #A1996. 






4 BI-TURBO BRUSH 



ABSOLUTELY FREE WITH ORDER! 



f THE DAZER' 




Even the most dedicated canine affi- 
cionado can sometimes encounter un- 
friendly dogs. Dazer'" provides a humane 
way to repel their advance, emitting ultra- 
sonic sound waves inaudible to humans and 
totally safe for dogs (unlike mace and other 
common deterrents). Pocket size iAW long) 
plastic case can also clip on belt; takes 1*9V 
battery, included. For joggers, hikers, bikers, 
seniors and kids— plus the proverbial post- 
maa $29.98, {$5.00) #A1829X. 



f GOURMET POPCORN POPPER 




All new high temperature 6 qt, popcorn 
popper Most electric and hot-air pop- 
pers "puff" the corn more than they "pop" 
it leaving it tough with hard centers. This 
flat-bottomed stove-top popper reaches 
475'^ and pops full in two minutes with 6 
quarts of the best popcorn you ever tast- 
ed. Stirring paddle with through-the-crank 
handle virtually eliminates burnt or un- 
popped kernels. Wooden handle for safe 
grip, two dump lids. Pop without oil for de- 
licious diet popcorn, 370 calories per 4 qt. 
bowl. Produce tender, fluffy old fashioned 
movie theater popcorn. Made in the USA. 
$27.98 ($5.25) ^A1963. 

T INNOVATIVE lOMZER 

A sophisticated electronic device that 
uses nature's way of cleaning air — 
emitting trillions of negatively charged ions 
that act like magnets, attracting microscop- 
ic particles of dust, smoke and pollen. One 
belongs in every room, but sometimes a 
table-top ionizer just isn't practical or desira- 
ble for reasons of space or your decor. This 
tiny unit (iy2"x3") provides an ingenious so- 
lution, plugging right into any wall outlet 
where it will 
remain incon- 
spicuous while 
performing its 
mighty task, 
With "on" indica- 
tor light and col- 
lector pad that 
can be rinsed 
and, eventually, 
replaced. By 
Pollenex, for 
fresher air in 
home or office 
$39.98 (S4.00) 
i?A1857. 




HOW TO 
ORDER 

30 Day 
Money Back 

Guarantee 
For Exchange 

or Refund 



CALL TOLL FREE 24 HOURS A DAY, 7 DAYS A WEEK 

1-800-365-8493 

For Customer Service Only 

1-800-678-4955 (M-F: 9 AM-5 PM EST) 

We Honor: 
MasterCard, visa, and American Express. 



If ordering by mail send remittance to 
MAIL ORDER MALL, Dept PH 071 
PQ Box 3006, Lakewood, NJ. 08701. 
Item price is followed by shipping 
and handling in ( ). Be sure to add 
both together to arrive at total price 
NJ. residents add 7% sales tax. When 
using credit card — include account 
number, exp date, signature Sorry, no 
Canadian, foreign or COD. orders. 



Magalog Marketing GrouD inc © 1991 



1905 Swarthmore Ave, Lakewood. NJ 08701 




REVIEWS 



PRODUCTIVITY 



sions often basic designs. All are high- 
ly recommended. 

DAVID ENGLISH 



IBM PC and compatibles, PostScript or 
other printer ttiat can print EPS graphfes, 
CorelDRJii/]/! required to edit graphics— 
$79.95-$1 29.95 per package 

ARTBEATS 

Box 20O83 

San Bernardino. CA 92406 

(714)881-1200 





Every player a god, every pixel 
a species. 
Thai neatly sums up SimEarth, 
the expansive exploration of plan- 
etary management from Maxis. Like 
its ancestor SimCity, this simulation 
puts you in charge of hfe, lets you say 
who gels liberty, and even demands 
that you oversee the pursuit of happi- 
ness. But instead of lording it over a 
measly city, Sim Earth sets you up as 
master of an entire planet. 

SimEarth is nothing if not ambi- 
tious. It may be a toy compared to 
planetary models developed for ch- 
mate and weather research, but it's a 
toy that's hard to put down. Loosely 
based on the Gaia hypothesis — that 
our world is a living system that 
adapts to changing conditions — Sim- 
Earth includes everything from cli- 
mate control and continental drift to 
evolution, mutation, and the quest for 
fire. All of these are integrated into an 
entertaining and educational look at 
the dynamics between a planet and its 
inhabitants. 

You can sit back and watch a 
world develop on its own, but the real 
fun is in getting your hands dirty and 
messing around. You'll make a dozen 
decisions every minute, many under 
pressure, so ease of use is critical. Sim- 
Earth sports a graphical interface 
clearly taken from its Macintosh ver- 
sion (Maxis develops first on the 
Mac), so you'll need a mouse to enjoy 
the game. Though the interface proves 
more than adequate, PC users 



wouldVe been more comfortable with 
a true Windows approach. 

SimEarth offers up seven ready- 
to-evolve planets, from Earth of the 
Cambrian Era to Aquarium, an all- 
water world. You can terraform Mars 
and Venus, build continents on 
Aquarium, or even test the Gaia hy- 
pothesis on Daisyworld. Play with 
Earth of 1990 and see if you can moti- 
vate humanity to head into space. Or 
try to make dinosaurs the intelligent 




Create and maintain a world. 

life form by manipulating Earth of 
550 million years ago (they're not that 
smart: they still have wars). 

The real challenge comes in \tX- 
Xm% SimEarth create random worlds. 
You can start at any of four points in 
time, but the best place is at the begin- 
ning, when the world's a slag heap. 
Customize continents with earth- 
quakes, tidal waves, meteors, and 
more. As oceans form, you populate 
them with single-celled species and 
propagate life. At your whim you can 
extinguish some creatures while pro- 
moting the evolution of others. 

As millions of years slip by, you'll 
evolve multicell organisms — it's not 
hard — and move to the next step, cre- 
ating intelligent life. That's not always 
easy, for some planets seem stubborn 
about letting advanced Hfe flourish. 
Fortunately, you've got a well-stocked 
set of planetary tools. Windows open 
to show you simplified models of the 
geosphere, atmosphere, and bio- 
sphere. A click of the mouse button 
slows down the greenhouse effect to 
cool off a hot world, speeds up muta- 
tions to push evolution, or puts a stop 
to continental drift to hold land in 
place. Changing a variable costs ener- 
gy, the currency of SimEarth, but if 



you're playing in experimental mode, 
money's no object. In any other 
mode, energy is limited, and your op- 
tions restricted to what you can af- 
ford. It's a nice brake on out-of- 
control terragenesis. 

Later, if your world matures, 
you'll get a shot at guiding the domi- 
nant species toward civilization and 
then through its technological stages. 
You set priorities for your wards in an 
attempt to stop plagues and wars (or 



□ Eaotphsn Model 


"^ 


~V"" ■ Eraiion 






1 


AxiatTIH 


RHHI mjm^^^K^^^^M 


jS 





You can modify and monitor planetary 
formation in the geosphere wmdow. 

promote them if you're in a bad 
mood). And you can try to nudge 
them to use more efficient energy 
sources, though the consequences — 
emissions from fossil fuels and possi- 
ble radiation poisoning from atom- 
ics — are as well known to your 
random world as they are to our own. 

Manipulating all this sounds 
daunting. It's not. Icons and buttons 
change the satelHte-from-space view 
to give information about cataclysmic 
events, air and water temperatures, 
animal and plant distribution, and 
wind and water currents. Other icons 
open selections to place life forms or 
perform acts of God. Menus at the top 
of the screen lead you to the reports 
and graphs you need to keep track of 
your world's development. 

Play SimEarth on a VGA- 
equipped system if you can — the reso- 
lution and colors add to the 
experience. The program also sup- 
ports the Ad Lib, Sound Blaster, and 
Sound Master boards, so you can lis- 
ten to quality sound effects and music 
when meteors splash and new life 
evolves. You may have problems 
with mouse cursor ghosts in high- 
resolution modes, but the solution is 
simple for most, and Maxis' technical 
support is helpful. SimEarth is slightly 
unstable; the simulation crashed twice 
in as many days with no warning and 
for little reason. Memory require- 
ments are high but not unreasonable 



126 



COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 



CQfUIPUTE has the 





HINTSJIPS, 
& STRATEGIES 

for the most popular 
PC games! 

The Official Book of Ultima 

by Shay Addams 
Introduction by Lord British 

Written with the assistance of Lord British, Ultima's creator, this book 
includes inside information found nowhere else. Packed full of hints, tips, 
anecdotes, and never-before-published clues for all six Ultima adventures. 
244 pages 



The Official Book of 
Leisure Suit Larry 

by Ralph Roberts 
with help from Al Lowe 

Written with ttie hetp of the creator 
and designer of Leisure Suit Larry, 
this best-selling book covers Larry 1, 
II, and IIL Packed full of all the hints 
and tips. Includes Lary's life story 
an exclusive interview with Larry 
Laffer, and some candid connments 
from Larry's women. 228 pages 



Ttre Official F-19 Stealth Fi§liter 
Handbook 

by Richard Sheffield 

Foreword by Major "Wild Bill" Stealey 

Take to the skies with F-19 Steaith 
Fighter and test this amazing aircraft. 
Learn all the thrilling maneuvers of 
this fantastic new fighter. Here's the 
key to mastering MicroProse's F-19 
Stealth F/jjWef simulator. 184 pages 



U I CSa I want more hints and tips. 
Please send me the books checked below. 



vki 



All orders 

shipped 

> within 48 

^ hours. ~ 



The Official F-15 Strike Eagle 
Haadbook 

by Richard Sheffield 
Foreword by Sid Meier 

Fty like an ace with MicroProse's 
best-selling F-t5 simulators. Covers 
both F-15 Strike Eagle and F-15 
Strike Eagle II You'll perform tactics 
and maneuvers you never thought 
possible. Filled with step-by-step 
instmctions and clear diagrams. 
224 pages 



Turn & Burn: The Authoritative 
Guide to Falcon 
by Howard Bornstein 
Foreword by Gilman Louie 

For both the beginner and experi- 
enced Falcon pilot, this book has a 
wealth of information, special tips, 
and proven strategies that will make 
you the master of the skies. Covers 
all versions of Falcon and each of the 
12 missions. 248 pages 



D Check or money order D MC D VISA 

. Signature 

Acct no ^ .^ 



.95 f 



. Exp. I 



Mame. 



D The Official Book of Leisure Suit Larry (21 5X) $12.95 

D The Official M5 Strike Eagle Handbook (2311) $12.95 

□ The Official Md Stealth Fighter Handbook (2176) $14.95 

G The Official Book of Ultima (2281) $14.95 

O Turn & Burn: The Authoritative Guide to Falcon (1978) $12.95 

Subtotal 

Sales tax (residents of NC. NY, & NJ add appropriate sales tax). 

Canadian orders add 7% goods and services tax. 

Shipping and Handling: $2 U.S. and Canada; $6 foreign 

Total Enclosed 



Street Address , 
City 



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All orders must be paid m U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Orders will be ship[>ed via 
UPS Ground. 

MAIL TO: Compute Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Peiinsauken, NJ 08109 JUL91CE 




REVIEWS 



LEARNING 



for most systems, assuming you don't 
run TSRs or crowd RAM with device 
drivers. Even on a 20-MHz 386SX 
system, though, SimEarih seemed 
sluggish. 

More than just a good time, Sim- 
Earth is an excellent example of trans- 
parent learning. You walk away from 
this simulation with a better under- 
standing of global interconnections. 
Watch firsthand how planetary' heat 
buildup snuffs out species, how high 
mutation rates make evolution leap 
like a Mexican jumping bean, and 
how technologies always have trade- 
offs. 

True, SimEarth makes assump- 
tions not everyone agrees with. All 
SimEarth life is carbon based, worlds 
easily form oceans, and the game de- 
velopers apparently take the Gaia hy- 
pothesis as gospel. No one said the 
world — even a made-up one — was 
perfect. On the other hand, you can 
play with ideological incorrectness if 
you want. Smash civilizations by 




Add new life forms to your developing 
planet and subtly alter the biosphere. 

eliminating moral barriers to war or 
obliterate entire species with the click 
of a button. It's all fun because none 
of it's real. 

SimEarth may be less inviting 
than the boffo bestseller SimCity, if 
only because it's more complex, and 
the intricacies of the 'ologies— geolo- 
gy, meteorology, biology, and technol- 
ogy—are scar>' compared to simple 
city planning. On the other hand, al- 
though SimEarth demands more 



from you, it gives back much more in 
return. 

This is a landmark PC program 
that everyone must play. Not because 
it's the morally correct thing to do, 
but because it fires your imagination 
like few other pieces of software. If ab- 
solute power corrupts absolutely, I 
plead guilty to addictive corruption. 
I've nurtured worlds, and I've killed 
worlds. Go ahead — indict me. Just 
keep your hands off my planet. 

GREGG KEIZER 



IBM PC and compatibles; 640K RAM 
(540K RAM free): EGA. MCGA, VGA. Her- 
cules, or Tandy 16-color; hard drive with 
at least 1 .5MB free; Ad Lib. Sound Blast- 
er. Sound Master, and Tandy sound sup- 
portGd— $69,95 
Also available for Macintosh— $69.95 

MAXIS 

Distributed by Broderbund 

17 Paul Dr. 

San Rafael. GA 94903 

(800)521>6263 

(800)33-MAXtS 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser Page 



173 Aamiga Warehouse ............ A-28 

141 Abracadata 138 

160 Action Management, Inc , 134 

162 Alpha Software 29 

166 Best Computer Supplies 135 

148CAPPCO , ..A-21 

210 Citizen American Corp IBC 

175 Compsult A-19 

161 Compsult G-15 

103 CompuServe , 9 

230 Computer Business Service .,.,..,.. 139 

1 14 Computer Direct 42. 43 

137COVOX . . 137 

196 Dariana Technology Group 35 

120 DCS Industries , . . , 57 

202 Delphi 49 

131 Demo Source ,,.... 136 

171 Digital Micronics A'21 

208 Digitek Software 11 

199 Direct Link 77 

203 Feltch s Software 139 

105 GEOWbrks .IPC, 1 

149 GfxBase Inc. A-15 

198 Gold Hill . . ......... 47 

165 Gosch Productions A-18 

1 74 Grapevine Group 1 37 

164 Great Cover-Ups A-20 

Hair Dynasty for Men 119 

157 Hammond Photo Services A-18 

Hard Drives International 53 

I. Den Videotronics A-1 7 

184 iht Software G-17 

10S International Toner Cartridge 140 

156 Interplay 7 

191 JEK Graphics ... A-20 

127 LWS Software 138 

158 LivingSoft 141 

183 Lucky Compuler .... 136 



Magalog 124, 125 

145 Maxximum Company ..,,....,...... 141 

146 Meggido A-7 

1 24 MicroLeague Sports 117 

Micro Logic 37 

1 38 MfcroMiga A-30 

119 MicroProse Software ................. 5 

142 MicroProse 116 

1 66 Montgomery Grant A-3 

1 87 Montgomery Grant G-3 

113 Mutual of New York ................ 134 

135 Natural Graphics , A-22 

1 25 Needham's Electronics 1 36 

153 Nev/ Worid Computing 111 

194 NSf Computer Product 39 

152 Origin 103 

129 Paradise Software G-13 

176 Parson Technology 4 

130 PC Enterprises 140 

207 Poor Person Software A-17 

143 Prodigy ...... 26 

Professional Cassette Center 92, 93 

151 Professor Jones. Inc. ............... 141 

168 Psygnosis 97 

Quick Study Software, Inc. 137 

121 Ramco .... 140 

221 SNK 109 

209 SFA 31 

116 SeXXy Software' \\\.\\\\\\V.\'.'.\'.\'.^AQ 

1 67 Shark Byte Software A-18 

144 Sierra OnUne , BC 

136 Signs Etc. By D. Knox A-18 

257 Sir Tech 107 

109 Smart Luck Software 140 

126 SoftShoppe 140 

1 63 Software Excitement A-5 

241 Software of the Month Club 140 

SOGWAP .. .....G'17 



118 Spectrum Holobyte 98. 99 

130 Starware Publishing Corp. 140 

Strategic Simulations, Inc 13 

111 Tangent 270 A-22 

170 Tenex .,.,....,, G-5 

134 The Krueger Co A-29 

145 The Maxximum Company 141 

132 The Other Guys A-19 

123 The Soft Group , ,G-15 

122 The Sterling Connection . . A-13 

172 Wedgewood A-29 

193 WritePro 140 



Amiga Resource Disk Subscription . 1 21 . A-1 1 

COMPUTE'S Best PC Games 105 

COMPUTE Books 55, 85, 113, 127, 130, 131. 
132. 133. 138, 141. G-13, A-28 

COMPUTE Subscription 89 

Gazette Disk Subscription G-14 

Gazette Productivity Manager G-11 

Gazette Subscription 1990 Gazette Index G-21 

Mean 18 Golf Course 115 

OMNI Subscription , 89 

PC Back Issues 142 

PC Disk Subscription 65 

PC Productivity Manager 79 

Power Up Your PC 45 

SharePak Disk Subscription 15 

Single Amiga Disk Order A-26 

SpeedScript Disk G-23 

Tutor Toys & Math \fciyager 95 



128 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




REVIEWS 



LEARNING 



STICKYBEAR 




Uh-oh . . . Stickybear is stuck 
among ener;gy-ealing spheres. But 
good news! Energy stars stand by 
to help, if our hero's helper can 
only solve some word puzzles. That's 
Stickybear Word Scramble, a fun and 
attractive educational package from 
Optimum Resource. Featuring key- 
board control and speech capabilities, 
it offers three difficulty levels and suf- 
ficient challenge for children ages 
7-1 1 and beyond. Within levels, Word 
Scramble monitors response accuracy 
and adjusts problems accordingly — 
a nice touch. Bonus points reward 
speed and accuracy. Top players 
earn a spot on the high-scorer board, 
and custom word lists are easy. With 
an assortment of scrambled words, 
hidden words, and word-oriented 
Concentration-style matching 
games, replay value is high. 

STEVE HUDSON 



IBM PC and compatibies; 51 2K RAM; 
CGA, EGA, MCGA, VGA. Tandy 1 6-COlor: 
supports Echo Board, Govox Speech 
Thing, and Tandy speech — $49.95 

OPTtMUM RESOURCE 

10 Station PI. 

Norfdk. CT 06058 

(800)327-1473 

(203) 542-5553 (in Connecticut) 



SUPER SOLVERS 
TREASURE 




How do you engage children's at- 
tention long enough to teach 
basic skills? What can you do to 
encourage kids to practice skills 
they've learned? Try inviting Ihem on 
an electronic excursion to Treasure 
Mountain! This "fantasy-exploration" 
software combines action-packed, ar- 
cadelike entertainment with puzzle- 
solving challenges to keep players 
creatively absorbed for hours. The 
Learning Company's Treasure Moun- 



tain! pits infamous Morty Maxwell 
against fast-thinking Super Solver de- 
tectives. Immoral Morty has mali- 
ciously made off with the mountain's 
magic crown. Sagacious Super Solvers 
must stop the merciless Maxwell from 
using the crown to steal the moun- 
tain's magic gold. Will Super Solvers 
successfully rescue the crown and beat 
misguided Morty at his own game? 




Super Solvers Treasure Mountain! scores 
major points for educational fun. 

Enterprising detectives embark 
on a journey up the mountain in 
search of hidden treasures. To prevent 
the unrelenting Maxwell from carry- 
ing out his dishonorable deeds, play- 
ers must successfully retrieve enough 
booty to fill the treasure chest at the 
mountaintop. The task is not an easy 
one. There are several obstacles to 
overcome along the way. 

Success depends on capturing the 
mountain's elusive elves. Youngsters 
must hunt for elves who carry scrolls. 
When nabbed in Super Solver nets, 
the sprightly (but sometimes pesky) 
beings offer clues to treasure where- 
abouts. Players who correctly answer 
an elf's question win a clue. Answers 
may require solving a math problem, 
completing a word puzzle, recognizing 
word patterns, or applying a scientific 
principle. 

Super Solvers have three chances 
to answer an elf's question. They win 
two gold coins and a clue word for an- 
swering correctly on the first try, one 
gold coin and a clue word for a correct 
answer on the second try, but just a 
clue word (no gold coin) for questions 
answered correctly the third time 
around. As Super Solvers move up in 
the clubhouse ranks, scroll-bearing 
elves become harder to catch, there 
are more hidden treasures on each 
mountain level, and players must suc- 
cessfully avoid mischievous elves who 



throw coin-eating magic dust. 

Treasures are hidden in places 
that match two of the three word 
clues. For example, if clue words are 
five, flowers, and round, enterprising 
detectives must be on the lookout for 
items like five fiowers, round flowers, 
or five round objects (possibly rocks 
or bushes). When youngsters come 
upon a mountain location that match- 
es two of the clue words, they drop a 
coin. If there's a treasure hidden in 
that spot, it is automatically theirs. 
When Super Solvers find the spot that 
matches all three clue words, they ob- 
tain a key that unlocks the path lead- 
ing up to the next mountain level. 

Players' nets deteriorate with ev- 
ery elf captured. Eventually, nets are 
so damaged that elves can easily es- 
cape. When this happens, Super Solv- 
ers must locate a ''net cave" and use 
the gold to pay for repairs. Luckily, 
players who do not have enough coins 
eventually find more coins along the 
mountain path. 

Unlike conventional arcade di- 
versions, Treasure Mountain! offers 
more than just mindless entertain- 
ment. The game encourages children 
to use analytical reasoning to solve 
puzzles, inductive thinking to infer 
connections, deductive logic to test 
hypotheses — all without imposing 
time limitations. Colorful animated 
graphics, realistic sound effects, and 
positive audiovisual reinforcement 
make the mountain a wonderful place 
to visit. 

Treasure Mountain! rewards curi- 
osity, motivates exploration, and rein- 
forces basic elementary school subject 
areas. In the final analysis, however, 
the software succeeds because chil- 
dren find that it's a lot of fun to play! 
And for parents, Treasure Mountain! 
means that children spend playtime 
productively. 

CAROL HOLZBERG 



IBM PC and compatibles, 51 2K RAM 
(640K RAM for the Tandy 1000 series). 
CGA, EGA, MCGA, VGA. or Tandy 16- 
color; 8 MHz or faster recommended, in- 
cludes SVz- and 5V4*inch disks, supports 
Ad Ub and Sound Blaster sound boards, 
mouse optional, hard drive tnstaUable — 
$49.95 

THE LEARNING COMRt^NY 
6493 Kaiser Dr. 
Fremont. CA 94555 
(800)852-2255 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 129 




NEW 

FROM 

cannpuTE 

THE 

OFFICIAL 

BOOK OF 

KING 5 QUESTJ 

SECOND EDITION 

COVERS 
KING'S QUEST I-V 

11 ere 's the 
updated, authorized guide to 
King's Quest, America's 
most popular series of 3-D 

animated adventure 
games. In no time, you'll 

puzzle out the 
answers to some of the 

most nagging 

enigmas of this series 

of best-seliing 

games, including the latest 

version, King's Quest V 

To order send $12.95 

plus $2 shipping and handling 

for each book ($4 Canada, 

$6 foreign) and applicable tax* to; 



COMPUTE Books 

C/O CCC 

2S00McClellanAve. 

Pennsauken, NJ 08109 



•ResidentsofNC, NJ.andNY 

add appropriate sales tax. Canadian 

orders please add 7% Goods 

and Services tax. 

All orders must t» paid in U.S. 

funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Please 

allow four weels for delivery. 



Offer good while supplies last. 



JUL9ICW 



REVIEWS 



LEARNING 



PLAYING WITH 
MICKEY MOUSE 




You sit at your home computer, 
your favorite driving simulation 
loaded and running. As you con- 
centrate on avoiding a fiery crash, 
suddenly a small voice about hip level 
pipes up,"Mom, can 1 play, too?" 

Your three-year-old can't race 
cars with you but wants to play com- 
puter games. What should you buy 
that can involve both of you? An ex- 
cellent first purchase would be one of 
the following Mickey Mouse packages 
from Disney. 

Mickey's Colors and Shapes is 
subtitled The Dazzling Magic Show. 
In this particular package, America's 
favorite mouse comes on stage and 
performs various magic acts, such as 
juggling and pulling an animal out of 
his hat, A friendly lady's voice leads 
your child through the game, and you 
can watch and help him or her make 
choices. 

Mickey's 123"s is called The Big 
Surprise Party Your child plans a par- 
ty for one of the Disney characters; 
buys toys, food, and decorations; and 
sends invitations. At the end, he or 
she serves the food. 

Mickey's ABC's offers you A Day 
at the Fair You begin by waking 
Mickey up at home and then go with 
him on a interesting trip to a country 
fair. Again, the friendly voice helps 
your child along. 

Children will find the controls for 
all these games to be user-friendly. 
There are no wrong moves. The ani- 
mation is lop-quality and quite imagi- 
native. Your child will be entertained 
and may never notice he or she is also 
learning numbers, letters, and shapes! 

How do the three packages com- 
pare to one another? I played all three 
games with my three-year-old son, 
and he liked each one. But ABC's is 
my favorite by far. My son is well ac- 
quainted with the alphabet and spell- 
ing, and we both were challenged by 
the game. Besides offering a chance to 
become familiar with letter shapes 
and sounds, this game also teaches 
many useful cognitive skills necessary 
for computer use — ^primarily learning 



to make the connection between what 
you see on the screen and what you 
need to do with the keyboard. Your 
child will learn how to control Mick- 
ey's actions and how to anticipate 
events that are offscreen. He or she 
will learn to go through several steps 
to arrive at certain places or to see cer- 
tain actions. 



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Your child and Mickey spend a day at 
the fair together in Mickey's ABC*s, 

My least favorite Mickey Mouse 
adventure is I23's, It is only slightly 
more interactive than television. Each 
number that is pressed causes a 
lengthy animation sequence. My son 
enjoyed looking at it, but he was not 
very involved in what was happening. 
A lot of number information was 
handed to him, without much oppor- 
tunity for active thought until the par- 
ty at the end of the game. 

Colors and Shapes is my son's fa- 
vorite game. It calls for the most cre- 
ativity, particularly during the 
segment in which he creates his own 
picture by selecting colors and shapes. 
The animation is less dramatic than 
that in ABC's, but that didn't affect 
his level of interest. This game comes 
with a soft rubber template printed 
with color blocks and shapes that fits 
over the keyboard. I think this makes 
it an especially suitable first computer 
game for the youngest of children. 

Which of these packages should 
you purchase if you can afford only 
one? Colors and Shapes is best for the 
child who has the least computer 
experience and is still unfamiliar with 
letters and numbers. If your child 
likes Candyland, he will love Colors 
and Shapes. ABC's is the most com- 
plex, interactive game. It is best for 
the more computer-literate, verbal 
child who is able to discern patterns 
and make complex connections. 
Somewhere in between, 123 's is the 



130 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




REVIEWS 



BOOKS 



one to pick if your child is one of 
those who has a love of numbers. 



BETH A^fN MURRAY 



IBM PC and cximpatibles: 51 2K RAM, 
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COMPLETE LAPTOP 

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Some recent analytical surveys 
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than half of the computers sold in the 
United Slates, More and more people 
are looking to portables, laptops, and 
notebooks as their secondar>', or even 
primar)', machine. Students, writers, 
accountants, sales reps — anyone who 
needs portability and functionality 
needs a laptop. That person also needs 
a solid grounding in what the laptop 
computer can and can't do. 

This book, by David H. Roth- 
man, leads readers through the prom- 
ise and peril of laptop use. The early 
pages are devoted to detailed descrip- 
tions of various laptop designs, with 
pros and cons cleariy spelled out 
Chapter 3 is devoted to software solu- 
tions for laptop users (who are always 
short of storage space, especially with 
less expensive models). 

In light of Rothman's statement 
that laptops are superior to all other 
communication devices, it isn't sur- 
prising that several of the book's chap- 
ters are devoted to that idea. Here 
you'll find everything from a tour of 
online services to a primer on logging 
on, no matter how inhospitable or ad- 
versarial the terrain. 



Throughout, the author main- 
tains a good balance of fact and hu- 
mor, which will help readers gel more 
from these pages. Only a couple of 
biases mar an otherwise clear — if 
somewhat lighthearted — approach. 
Rothman hates mice and especially 
abhors graphical user interfaces 
(GUIs). Considering the movement 
toward such environments, Rothman 
could have served his readers belter 
with solid information about using a 
laptop with a GUI, rather than dis- 
missing them outright. These faults 
are outweighed, however, by the 
book's overall usefulness. 

PETER SCISCO 



AutfTor: David H. Rothman 
384 pages— $18-95 

ST. fVlARTiN'S PRESS 
175 Fifth Ave, 
NewYork. NY 10010 



CYOEOPONK- 
lOTLAWS ANO 
lACKERS ON 
THE COMPOTER 
ER 



It all started with the phone 
phreaks. These outlaws made mon- 
keys out of the biggest monopoly on 
earth^ — the telephone company — 
and tweaked the noses of the electron- 
ic lawmen determined to track them 
down. And because nobody really 
loves AT & T, there may've been a 
certain amount of tacit support for 
their activities among the common 
folk, who were happy to see someone 
finally getting back at the big, imper- 
sonal bureaucracies of the world. Wil- 
liam Gibson knew how to tap into 
that latent desire for revenge when he 
wrote Neuromancer, as did John 
Brunner when he wrote Shock Wave 
Rider, Bruce Sterling when he wrote 
Islands in the Net^\xsX as George Or- 
well knew it when he created the trag- 
ic hereof/ 954. 

It was an easy step for these mis- 
creants to lake from telephone hack- 
ing to computer hacking, and since 



THE 
OFFICIAL 



TO 
ROGER WILCOS 

SPACE 

ADVENTURES 

COVERS SIERRA DN-LINE'S 
SPACE QUEST MV 

1 he waiting 
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This Official Guide 

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To Order send $1495 plus $2 

shipping and handling for each 

book ($4 Canada, $6 foreign) and 

applicable tax^ to: 

COMPUTE Books 

c/o CCC 
2500 McCEellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 06109 

'Residents of NO, NJ, and NY add appropriate 

sales tax. Canadian orders piease add 1% Goods 

and Sen/ices tax. 

All orders must be pasd in U.S, funds drawn on 
a U.S. bank. Please allow four weeks for delivery. 

Offer good while supplies last. 

JUL91CN9 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE t31 




QUICK & EASY 




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— Q & E Guide to AppleVtorks (109-9) 

_ Q & E Guide to Borland's Quattro (148*X) 
_ Q & £ Guide to dBASE III Plus (107-2) 
_ Q & E Guide to dBASE IV (206-0) 
_ Q & E Guide to Desktop Publishing (112-9) 
„ Q & E Guide to Harvard Graphics (214-1) 
_ Q & E Guide to HyperCard (187-0) 

— Q & E Guide to Learning Lotus 1-2-3 (174-9) 
_ & E Guide to Lotus 1-2-3 Macros (141-2) 
_ Q & E Guide to Microsoft Excel on the Mac 

(131-5) 
_ Q & E Guide to Microsoft Word 3.0 on the Mac 

(135-8) 
_ Q & E Guide to Microsoft mr6 5 (219-2) 
_ Q & E Guide Microsoft Vtord on the IBM PC 

(133-1) 
--Q&EGuide to OS/2 (137-4) 
_ Q & E Guide to PC Excel (1404) 
_ Q & E Guide to R:BASE System V (132-3) 
_ Q & E Guide to Using MS-DOS (218-4) 
_ Q & E Guide to ^ntura Publisher (223-0) 
_ Q & E Guide to WordPerfect Series 5 (181-1) 
_ Q & E Guide to VtordStar 2000 \fersion 3.0 

(168-4) 

Total Number of Books , 

X $8 each equals 

Saieslax(NaNJ.NY 
resident add appropriate 
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7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling 
(S2 U.S., $4 Canadian, 

S6 foreign) 

Total Enclosed 

(Check or Money Order in U.S. funds only, made 
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REVIEWS 



BOOKS 



JULSICNB 



'U 



this was primarily a province of juve- 
niles and the juvenile at heart, it was 
inevitable that some frat-house pranks 
might occur. The problem is that 
dropping a cherry bomb down a toilet 
in the campus administration build- 
ing frosts only a few well-deserving 
cookies. Dropping an electronic bomb 
on an international network of mil- 
lion-dollar computer installations rep- 
resents a hazard to business, the 
military, and millions — perhaps bil- 
lions — of lives. 

The stories related by the hus- 
band and wife team of Katie Hafner 
and John Markoff are legend: Kevin 
Mitnick, the telephone hacker ru- 
mored to have ruined the credit rating 
of a judge who ruled against him; Karl 
Koch, the paranoid computer spy who 
identified himself as Hagbard Celine, 
after the hero of a conspiracy novel, 
and ended up horribly killing himself 
by self-immolation; and rtm, the bril- 
liant Cornell student and son of a 
computer security expert whose inno- 
cent worm crashed computers from 
coast to coast and landed him in a 
legal quagmire. 

Many of the people in this book 
lake on other identities online— Pen- 
go, named after a penguin in a video- 
game; Obelix, after a French cartoon 
character; Captain Crunch; the Phan- 
tom; the Cheshire Catalyst; and so on. 
But what makes the book so success- 
ful is that it enters these identities. 
And, as you can imagine, the human 
stories behind a man who would iden- 
tify himself as a penguin or a woman 
who would call herself Susan Thunder 
are rife with attendant ironies. 

By using stolen credit card num- 
bers and network user identifications, 
the hackers were able to take advan- 
tage of system operators' gullibility, 
huge corporations' fear of bad publici- 
ty, and a kind of telephone con game 
called human engineering to break 
down seemingly impregnable security, 
and in the process they earned the ad- 
miration and respect of fellow hackers 
and impressionable young people 
throughout the world. 

The authors take you inside the 
minds and value systems of hackers, 
showing how human curiosity, and 
longing to be on the inside and privy 
to secret power, can become highly 
destructive impulses. The writing 
takes on a tense journalistic style that 
reveals the incredible depth of the re- 



search performed. Without becoming 
bogged down in technical details, it 
explains in layman's terms how the 
nets operate and how they were 
breached. Each of the hackers' stories 
is told in an insightful biography. 
Many of the characters in Cyberpunk 
seem driven, like addicts, unable to 
control their appetites for power, 
more to be pitied than censured. 

But there is no ambiguity about 
the carnage they have left behind. The 
authors look with a jaundiced eye 
upon the kind of society that results 
when fears of terrorism and vandal- 
ism overwhelm the desire to commu- 
nicate and remain open to human 
interaction. 

In all, Cyberpunk is a valid look 
at recent history, as important in its 
own way as any of the industry insid- 
ers' books about the corporate role in 
the computerization of America, and 
far more broad ranging and complete 
than Cliff Stoirs book The Cuckoo's 
Egg (to say nothing of the fact that 
Cyberpunk is far better written). Stoll 
appears now and then as a minor 
character in Cyberpunk, It was very 
enlightening to see this character 
(whom I felt I had come to know so 
well through his book) from the out- 
side. Cyberpunk is a masterwork of 
reportage, and it belongs on your 
bookshelf. 

ROBERT BIXBY 



Authors: Katie Hafner and John Martoff 
336 pages— $22.95 

SJMON& SCHUSTER 

Simon & Schuster BIdg. 

Rockefeller Center 

1 230 Ai/e. of the Americas 

NewYork, NY 10020 o 



This Publication 
is available in 
Microform. 

University Microfilms 
International 

Please seiid udditivnal iiiloniLitioii 



./.|,. 



3TO Norm Zeett Road. I>epl PR . Ann Artjor, Mi -18106 



132 COMPUTE 



JULY 1991 




REVIEWS 



BOOKS 



ALEX RANIMLL'S 





Known as a computer hardware 
junkie by most of my friends and 
associates, I spend a fair amount 
of lime out looking for '"good 
deals." I own two complete systems, 
but there always seems to be some 
card or peripheral needing an upgrade 
to a newer/faster/enhanced version. 
For those of you looking to buy a 
computer, whether for the first time 
or as an upgrade to a better system, 
reading Alex Randall's book will ex- 
pedite the decision-making process. 

This 240-page book covers the 
ins and outs of acquiring a used com- 
puter for both you and your business. 
Randall explains the tactics to employ 
whether you're the seller or the buyer 
of a system. Also covered well are 
where to advertise a computer and 
what to look out for, from both the 
seller's and buyer's perspectives. Even 
a computer novice will soon gain a 
better idea of what to look for and 
how much to pay. 

The author relates a few amusing 
stories regarding people he's dealt 
with and reveals common misconcep- 
tions concerning both price and value 
of different products (hint: four- to 
five-year-old computers are generally 
not worth 90 percent of the original 
sales price, but you'd be surprised at 
how many people hold this miscon- 
ception). The explanation of how sys- 
tems depreciate is useful if you're 
looking to sell a computer (as I am) 
and may help steer unwary first-time 
buyers away from that *'real good 
deal" that isn't. Quite useful and en- 
joyable, Alex Randall's Used Com- 
puter Handbook makes clear the state 
of the secondhand computer market. 
Don't shop without it. 

MIKE HUBBARTT 



Authors: Alexander Randall V and Steven 

J. Bennett 

240 pages— $14.95 

MICROSOFT PRESS 
One Microsoft Way 
Redmond. WA 98052-6399 
(800)888-3303 



THE COMPUTER 
'S 



If you're in the market for a person- 
al computer or just want to learn 
more about computers in general, 
then you should take a look at this 
new guide. Author Wayne Parker*s ex- 
periences as a writer and a computer 
programmer/user allow him to cover 
the A"Zs of selecting a computer to fit 
your needs. 

The Computer Buyer *s Handbook 
cuts through the rhetoric so pervasive 
in today's advertisements, explaining 
in layman's terms the technical jargon 
that surrounds peripherals such as 
monitors, modems, hard drives, 
printers, and mice; and the handbook 
offers recommendations regarding 
brands to try. Unix and OS/2 also re- 
ceive coverage, and new computer 
owners will welcome the overview of 
software. 

Although quite partial to 80386 
IBM and IBM-compatible systems, 
the author does briefly cover other 
systems like the Macintosh, NeXT, 
and Amiga computers. The Computer 
Buyer's Handbook lacks an index, 
does not cover in any detail either in- 
terrupt or I/O address conflicts be- 
tween add-on cards, and uses price 
information that was inaccurate as of 
April, 1991 (understandably, since the 
publication date is November, 1990, 
and six months can make a big differ- 
ence for prices in the computer 
industry). 

Loaded with valuable infor- 
mation, The Computer Buyer's Hand- 
book proves both useful and an 
enjoyable read. Before wantonly pur- 
chasing your peripherals, consider 
picking up The Computer Buyer's 
Handbook Its $ 1 6.95 price tag could 
save you money, time, and plenty of 
headaches. 

MIKE HUBBARTT 



Author: R. Wayne Parker 
238 pages— $16.95 

FAST FORWARD PUBLISHING 
P.O. Box 45153 
Seattle. WA 981 45-Ot 53 
(206)527-3112 



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JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 



133 



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US arflii9te<] with each Item APO/FPO.AK, HI, PR, Ciinartii I 

.intJPO Ba» rtrdwr^ add an dddiiiuniiM 5% 'shipping C.ililofira ' 

xriidt^ni'i iidd 5 2^% sales !a« Mo u* i^utsido ot C^xrorniji | 
Pa'ch ase o'dti' s >iviii be accepittd on a r^qi 30 duv rjasi^ only 

Tom Educaionai Accounts Federal a-id SialaQo^ A^noes. , 

did co'ooraions win a D4 Q rjSing o* 3A2 O' Oetf*' $50 i 

mm mum SQr PO ^ Products, peize. and av,iiiat>'ilt ara sutJitjcl i 

a:nflnjtfw[*iou!no;ce MoiT-Fti7*n-7prn, Sj« 1&*ni -Spm < 

Thank You for Your Order! ' 



Company 

AddressiNoPoaoii 
City. 



WkPh{_ 



-)- 



. HmPh(_ 



. State Zip _ 

-I- 



DESCRIPTION OF ITEMS TO ORDER: 



Card Number 
■ Exp. Date 



pfT 


Full D^^nption 


Pncfl Ea 


Tol Price 


Sh.p Ea 


Shtp Toiai 







































(.[ 



March Torsi Sntootrvj Toral 

1*1 \* 



Hancti^nq^ COD Add ^XO 



S3.00 



■cm- 



6 3b^' lai'CA Oihfir Ctiarges 

I 1 + 1 \- 



Circle Reador Service Number 166 



Resource 
Pkg. 



Voice Mail 

Money Making 

Toolkit 



^ 



^ 



_r 



Z 



*5(). 

Trade-in 

Value 



2 for Cusiomer 
Support. 3 for a 
Live Openitor. 



Up 10 Ih ^ 

channels 
suppcfled 
OfijnAT J 



Get CASH From Your Personal Computer! p 

Generate ihou sands of dollars monthly in your spare lime by 
^ adding oyr voice processing hardware and software to your 
existing IBM 286/386 personal computer or clone. 

Starting at only ^299, your personal service bureau will offer 

. voicemail/pager rentals, talking yellow-page advertising, 

A senior's monitoring, or outbound prospecting for profit. 

Our ^25 Entrepreneur'.s Toolkit provides a complele lisl 

of proven PC based opportunities, clip-art materials, and 

invaluable insight into .starting your own business. 

^ After your review, we invite you to cash-in your toolkit 

towards over ^50 in discounts on DemoSource products. 

To ask questions / order your toolkit! 



yisA 



1 800 283-4759 

81H772-25M 



COD'^ Welcome 

A Few Home Based Ventures Featured In Our *25 Toolkit! 



NfiMI 

BigmOuth 
Voice BBS 
QuickLine 
ElderChek 


Il£iJQRiEXlJm 

Voice Mailbox Rentals 
Electronic Matchmaking 
Write Programs in Basic 
Senior Citizen Check-Fn 


S299 

*799 
M125 
M625 


ILEhlO_Kir 

818 772-7729 
^25 



JTradgmartts jjgfesgn'iw) belong to tneif respectrve publish er^ ■ C^eck stata regutatior>s befofe using otrtboufxf sofiwafB 



DemoSource 



8646 Corbin Avenue • Nortliridge, CA • 91324 • USA 
Circle Reader Service Number t31 



EPROM PROGRAMMERS 



Stand- Alone Gang Programmer 



8 ZfF Sockets for Fast Gang 
Pfogfamming and Easy 

Splttting 




20 Key Keypad 



20 X 4 Une LCD Display 



Internal Programmer for PC 



• Comptetely stand-alone or PC-driven 

• Programs E{E|PROMs 

• T Ntegami ol DHAM 

• User upgradatile to 32 Megabit 

• .3/,6" IIF Sockets. flS-23Z. 

Parallel In and Out 

' 32K internal Flaslr EEPROM for easy 
film ware upgrades 

• Quick Pulse Algorttltm (27250 
InSsecj MegablHnl7s8Cj 

• 2 year v^arranty 
•Made in the U.S.A. 
•Technical support by phone 

• Complete manual antJ schematic 

• Single Socket ProBrammer also 
available. S550.00 

• Spilt ,ir.a Shuffle 16 & 32 bit 

■ 10D User Definable Macros, 10 User 
Definable Conhgurations 

• lnie!iigent Identifier 

• Binary. Intel Hejc. and Motorola S 

• 2716 to 4 Megabit 



This 
s|lit 
iir 






rfew inteliigent Averaging Algorithm Programs 64A in 10 sec. 255 in 1 min , 1 Meg (27010. 01 1 ) 
in 2 min. 45 sec, 2 Meg (27C2001 ) in 5 min. Internal card with external 40 pin ZIF 

• Reads, Verifies, and programs 2716, 32, 32A. 
64. 64A. 128. l2flA 256, 512, 513, 010, 01 1 . 301 , 
27C2001. MCM 66764. 2532, 4 Megabits 

• Aiitomaijcallir tets programming voltage 

• Load and save butter to disk 

• Binary. Intel Hen. and Motorola S formats 

• No persoRBlltr modfllu roqttired 

• 1 Year warranty 

• 10 days money back guarantee 

• Adapters available for 8748, 49. 51, 751 . 52, 
55. IMS 7742. 27210. 57Ct024., and memory 
cards 

• Made in U.S.A. 

EMPDEMO.EXE available BBS (916) 972-8042 



NEEDHAM^S ELECTRONICS 

4539 Orange Grove Ave. • Sacramento, CA 95841 

iMoncay-Ffioa,-. 8am-5pmPST) COD 




by 

iiore 
than 



readers 

each 

month. 



136 



Circle Reader Service Numbef 125 
COMPUTE JULY 1991 




386-25MHZ 

O40mb VGA Laptc»> 



Laptop System Featurje:s 

Q4MB RAM exp.to8M&32KCache 

Q 1-16 Bit Exp. Slot (1/2 Card) 

a 42MB HD, f9ms, 1.44 Floppy 

a Integrated VGA (640x4B0r 

U Badoit LCD Disday 32 Gmyscai^ 

□ 65W AC Power 2^1 10V Autoswitch 

a MS DOS 4.01 / Windows 3.0 

G 2 Serial, 1 Parallel Port, FCC Class B 

lOOMB 18ms HD $375.***' extra 



Complete Systems 
1WB«Dno/40MB 

lES&ta |7d5.00 
38$8X20ln»&.00 

m-m iiadswoo 

386-33 116^.00 

Cifl for Cofqpteltt 



486-33 ISA 

C-an^lA* D*ftk±«(» £ficcdl 

QSUPER VGA, 4MB RAM 
ai20 MB Haid Drive, 18ms 
ai28K Cache, exp. to 256K 



f'SlOS. 



00 



Since 1984 

Location! Nationwide 

Ckfl ftif tto 6H NHfMt T«tj 

4151 Bdtltnc, Suite 120 
Ad£H*on,TX752« 

1(800)966*7687 

FAX (214) 387-1560 



1733a Sotrthcdtter Pkwy 
Tukwita, WA W18« 

1(800)367-5826 

10773 SW Bvrtn,-Hill*. Hw> 
Beavtttoft, OR 97005 

1(800)348-5825 





HOURS 9«m to fipm 



Uiacr«J^B<TBP^tK»<AL 



MICR(iNICS 

COUPCTIll INC. 

atjthorized distributor 



Circle Reader Service Number 163 



Make 
Tracks... 

... to your nearest mailbox and 
send for the latest copy of the free 
(Consumer Information Clatalog. 

It lists about 200 free or low-cost 
government publications on topics 
like health, nutrition, careers, 
money management, and federal 
benefits. Just send your name and 
address to: 

Consumer Information Center 
Department MT 
Pueblo, Colorado 81009 



ir 



\ public service of ihls publicaUon and 
the Consumer Inrormaiion Center of the 
U.S. General Ser\ ices Administration. 



Qxi^ 



CONTROL 



*^ Memorize almost 
anything ! 

*■ Create an-screen 
fjashcards. 



*^ Review and quiz 
yourself on what 
YOU need to 
remember. 



CD 



CD 

3 



Quiz Control ht-lps pctiple of aH agei nvemoriT^ Lifge volumes of 
n^ieftaLs, This s(Kiightforv,-ird, inienctivt siuth' prt)grain gives student a 
chance u> take control of iheir ij^ti learning. 
Cn'amiH}\)ur own Jiles for Quiz Control is so bemtiijuUy sitnpk ami 
lix' iristmaiom so fkmisiakifigfy dear that nfeti the most diehanl 
computer plsdjtc cannot fxp bu I succeed 

Deborah Landes.PCM Magazine (January 199U. 

Qui/ CaniR)l p<wes questions on the saetn in 
either a multiple choice or fill in the blank format 
After each qiiii. yixir score is displaced on the 
scTeen. You can then s^ne the incofteclK' aas-^ered 
questitms for further reiiew and quizzing 

Create your own c|uesiions and anmers or purchase 
ready made Siud>' Mtxlules, Modules now available include 
American HisliMy. Basic French. Basic English Skills, Basic Writing 
Skills. Basic Science, Calories and Nutrition, Medical Terms, Qjmputer ' 
Literacv and IX)S 







OUIZCOMTROL S49.95 

STUDY MODULES - SmS each. US shpghdlg 14.95. 
■• NY orders add applicable sales tax . Site licenses available. 

For IBM PCs and compatibles 






^\ 




Call 800 JB2- 5930. 



I ©Copyright 1991 

'' Quick Study Software Inc. 

' 170 Hamilton Avenue 
White Plains. New York 10601 



Circle Reader Service Number 121 



SOUND MASTER^n 

THE MOST COMPATIBLE SOUND CARD IN THE WORLD 




• A high quality aJternative to 
"Sound Blaster, Better sound, 
less noise, more features. 

• 100% AdLib " Compatible. 

• Co vox Voice Master {voice 
commands), Speech Thing , 
and MIDI Maestro'" compatible, 
Internal PC speaker supported. 

• AH digitized speech and sound 
formats supported, including 
synthesized speech, PCM, 
ADPCM, & CVSD. 



"Direct-to-disk" DMA digitizer, 
variable sample rales to 25K/sec 
for recording, 44K^'sec for 
playback. 

Full duplex MIDI interface. 
Cables and software included. 

FM Music. MIDI, and Digitizer can 
function together. 

Audio amplifier with volume 
control. Low noise, low power 
electronics. Speaker included. 

Proudly Made in the U.S.A. 



Your Best Choice For Multi-Media Sound, 

ONLY $229.95 ( plus S5 Shipping & Handling) 

ORDER HOTLINE: (503) 342-1271 M-F 8 AM to 5 PM PST. 

VISA/MC/AMEX phone or FAX orders accepted. NO CODs, 30 Day Money 

Back Guarantee if not completely satisfied. One year warranty on hardware, 

CALL OR WRITE FOR FREE PRODUCT CATALOG 

CX)VOX iNC, 675 Conger Street • Eugene, OR 97402 
^ Phone (503) 342-1 271 • FAX 503-342-1283^ 





Circle Reader Service Number 137 



<;r7;;:;>vTHE grapevine group, inc. .^wise^T, 

Mb-UU3> COMPARE OUR PRtCBS ^m ^ 

IBM & COMWTIBLES AMIGA/COMMODORE 



UPGRADE/R£FLAC£MEKT 
CHIPS/MODULES 



AMIGA UPQRAO€/REPLACEMENT 
CHIPS 



IBM PS/2 

PS;2 25/286 1512K) . . . . , 45 25 

30,286 (2MB) 1*3 7S 

PSf2 (;MB) 72 50 

50z, &5s«. 65&* (2MB) 13350 

55a* a 65«ix t^MS} 320 25 

SO. bQi. 55sx, 60 & 65SK (2-8MB BO) . . . 37S.S0 

{4.8MB BD) . S1O-0O 

(BMB BD} , - . 823.75 

70-E61, 06T. 121 nWB) . . . , 74,00 

12MB) 134.00 

70-A21 , AX1 , BX1 (2MB) ............ 134.00 

30^041 11MB MOO) = 9375 

BO-nl. 121. 311 & 321 (2M8 MOD) . 150 00 
B0-A21. A31 14MB MOO) 350.75 

COMRAQ 

Deskpro 286e (IMS) 762S 

(2MB) 14375 

(4MB) , - 343-25 

tDeskpfO 386s (1MB BD) 157,50 

(4MB BD) 336 25 

(mSMOD) .95,75 

(4MB MOD} .,.,.,. - . 286.25 

Deskpro 386/200 (IMB BO) .......... 157,50 

(4MBB0I 340 25 

(1MB MOD) .9575 

14MB MOO) 266 25 

Oesk^O 386/33, 486/25, 33 (2MB MOD). 15175 
(8WS MOO) 76875 

LTE (512K MOO) . . , 151.73 

LTt/286 (IMB MOOJ 75,75 

j2MB MOD) . 155,00 

t4MB MOD) - - , 6Bfi 75 

AST 

Cupfd-32 Premium Series (1M8) . , , 75,00 

386 Oesktop-l6SX, 25, 33 (4MB), ,..,,, 33775 

Premum II Desktop (8MB) , 679.50 

386SX20. 486 Desktt^25. 25E. 33 

iCupKf} 396.25 

Premium Exec (iMB) 19075 

3S6SX. 266 (4MB) 427,50 

Tl 

TravfltMate 2000 (tMB MOO) . , ^81 ,25 

TraveiMato 3000 (2MB MOO) expandaCte 225,00 

APPLE 

Elsi NEW {2MB) 1B6-K 

(SMB) 650.00 

Classc NEW (1MB BD) .,.,-.. 84.50 

(2MB) ...107.50 

UserWrttef (1MB) . . ; 87 50 

l)/N7X(4MB) , .24125 

LASER PRINTER UPGRADE 

HP Lflsef Jel If i 110 (2MB MODJ 1 4fl 00 

(4MB MOD) 229 95 

IIP HP3 A 3D (1MB MOD). 89 00 

(2MB MOO) , 135 00 

(4MB MOO) , - 224,00 

Epsor EPL-6000 (1MB MQO\ 156,75 

(2MB MOO) -,. 181-25 

(4MB MOD) 300 00 

Panasonic KX-P4420/440i (1MB MOO) , - 68-75 

(2MB MOD) - 206 25 

(3MB MOD) , . 262 50 

14MB MOD) ■ . . . , 331 ,25 



Fatter Agnus (e372A) 1MB witn chip pufler 

(a necessity) srd new nstructtons S9450 

8362 Dentsa HaH Bngfrit 26 50 

8520A aA dUp 15,50 

1 ,3 ROM Kickstarl 27.96 

2 ROM Kckstart cal 

S71& Gary ctiip 14.50 

A500 Keytjoam 109.50 

A2000 Keytxjard - 114.95 

PLCC Agnus chip pullof 8.95 



MEMORY EXPANSION 



1 X4/80 SC Zip for A3000 - - 34.95 

1X1/100NS 750 

256X4/12 fw \CD. GVP. ate ,..,.., 5.50 

Ixa^SIMM 49.» 

A2236 AT Bnidgetttanl KJt (oom()teta) . , , 499.^ 
Insider II Board for AlOOO (1.5 Megs,} - . 283.55 

A501-512K RAM Modute (fof A500) 49.50 

Kwfikstart (AlOOO 1,3 ROM) 87.50 



ICDPflOOUCTS 



AdRAM 540 (A500) OK 97.50 

(Each additional Mag add S38.00) 

AdRAM 5600 I7a00 

AdSCSl 2O0O 127.50 

AdRAM 2080 (A2000) OK - - . - . . , 11*00 

(Each adcMranaf 2 Megs add $68} 
AdSCSl 2080 BK 194.00 

(Each addtionaJ 2 Me^ add S9S) 

AdSpeed - - 207.00 

AdlDE 40 (3.5 k«) ....,.,,- 110.00 

Flici^ Free Video 306,00 

Flicker Fixef (Oy Microway) . - 234-50 



COMMODOftE REPLACEMENT CHIPS 



6510 CPU , 1150 

6526A CIA 12^ 

6581 SIO 12^ 

PLA/82S100 (ceramic) 1235 

6567 R3 V3C n 1S.9S 

Al 901/225/226/227 10J5 

8563 R9 CTT Control - 19-95 

064 Keytward (NEW) 19.95 

C^64 Ca£*oe( (NEW) 14 95 

AJ Commodofa chaps m stock. See catatog- 



AMIGA/COMMODORE DI/JfiHOSTTCS 



Amiga Oiagriostician Book/Sottwara . 1435 

C-64/A500 Service ManuaJ 34.95 

A1000/A2000 Sefvice Mamiai 4450 

C-128 Service ManuAl 4450 

Docteif AMI (software) 29,35 

AMI AS^iment System ^-50 



RERURABLE CO«IMO00RE/AMKU 
POWER SUPPLiES 



Low cosl/retHJilt printtiea<!3 . 



H« catAk>g 



A500 45 watt unit ineavy duty) 6750 

A2O00 Replaoement P/S - , . - . 1*7.00 

C64RB 1 8 amp (our beat seBer) 24.95 

C64 specif 4.3 amp. Heavy Oirty 37-95 

(Indudes FREE "Diagriosbaan' 46.95 vakie) 
Cl2a Heavy Duty 4-3 amp , 39.95 

Commodora/Amiffa R«<palra. CaB for pdCM. 

• *• OUR 12th YEAR •** 



HOT COMMODORE/AMIGA UPGRADES 



Me{|AChip 2000— upgrade your A2000 lo 2MB of chip RAM pr ffie powof of the A3000. Indudes 
A3O0O 2MB Agrus chip CooimoOOra navw wanted (o sob this roach the goooraJ pot*c . $339.00 
less reCkaie (ASOO version availatrfe soon) 

Muttislart (I— NEW ROM swrtcr? lor 3 ROMs (1.2, i-3. 20) and keytjoard oorlrtited $47.50 

Swilcn Activated Vter SKXi- tBoih units v«xH on al Amigas) ,..,-.- $37.95 

150 Watt ''Big Foot'* Universal Power Supply with fan. Aji absolute must idr tt>ose 

adding on nmore menrKyy/perpheralS- Usabte worWwtde $87.50 

Emergency Amiga Startup Kit— Sow to government PXs and now avaRaWe to al. 

Kit has aii cMips parts, sdiemaitc. Mistructions and dia^v>stic software programs, etc $99.50 

Computer S«ver (C-S4 Protection System) — Pvom oostiy repairs. Ow 52% of fafcjras are 
caused Oy ma(fufict)oning power suppfces Installs m seconds, ^io sotdenng 2.year wafranty, $17.95 
Commodore 1 750-51 2K RAM Expander (REU) (inciud^ Cominodofe 

Dtagnostcan 11, a S6 95 waiu©) $169.00 

Commodore Diagnostician II— Ut*jtes sophisticated gptis to locate fayity components on al 
C-64S & C1S41S (C-1 28/64 rrxxfe)- Save money and downtime by promptly kxabng fated chips- Nto 

equipment needed Success rate is 9&%. Over 28.000 SOW , . postage paid $5.^ 

(At^ailabie for Amiga computers at $14,95) 

New Commodore Power Supply— Super-tieavy. repairabte C-$4 PS wttti 4.3 amps, indudes 

©xt fuse, schemabcs and 1 year warranty. Comes with FREE ComnfxxJofB Diagnostoan II ($6.95 vak» 

OR programmers utilrty" p(ug-<n cartridge ($995 value). $37-95 

STU'A powerful Amiga diagnostic program oy Global upgrades, Inc $29.95 



Call for FREE 36-pa9e IBM/Amiga catalog. 
Contains products you wont find anywtwre else. 



C/S (914) 357-2424 

Pnces subject to change 



The Grapevine Group, Inc. 
3 Chestnut Street, Suffern, NY 10901 

Order line only 

1-800-292-7445 

Add UPS charges to above. 



m 



Fax (914) 357-6243 

Ws ship wor^dwtde 



Circle Reader Service Nunnbef 174 



DESIGN YOUR OWN HOME 

with your IBM, Macintosh, Apple II, or Apple IIgs 
Architecture Program 

Draw floor plans, side views, and structural 
details Calculate dimensions (feet/inches or 
metric), area & lumber. Use 154 architectural 
symbols, text, icons, pull-down menus. 



Interiors Program 

Arrange a room from the top. try different color 
schemes, then automatically view it from the 
side. Over 100 furniture pieces, each with 8 
rotations: text, on-screen measurements, pull- 
down menus. 

Landscape Program 

Create a full-color plan ot your property. Create 
a top view and use the auto side view feature to 
view your plan from any direction. Includes 
Slopes, scaling, and plant "aging." plant iden- 
tification, and shopping lists. 

Ask about our LIBRARIES, 

The Instant 
>:ui^^*^ Decorator 

This never-fail design coordinating method lets 
you analyze your interior decor. The program 
analyzes the compatability in each room of fur- 
niture and other elements and determines the 
degree of harmony or disharmony. Become an 
expert interior decorator overnight! 

Applell, Laser 128 (64K) 
Macintosh (512K); IBM [256K) 

Instant Decorator ... ONLY $49.95 





Arclutecture, Interiors or Landscape 
System Requirements and Prices 

A"pplefl/Laser128, 64K .... . $69.95 ea. 

Apple IIGS, 1 MB $89.95 ea, 

Macintosh, 1 MB $99.95 ea. 

iBM.640K $99^5 ea- 

To order call 

800-451-4871 or 

FAX (503) 683-1925 

By Mail: Add S7 shipping first program, plus 
S2 ea. additionaL Send Visa/MasterCard num- 
ber with expiration date or check. 

bracadata 

the source of plan-making software 




SINCE 7985 



PC BOX 2440 

EUGENE, OF 97402 

(503} 342 3030 



Circle Reader Service Number 141 



OMNI 
TIME CAPSULES 




Now the magazine of the future con be 

kept for the future. Store your issues of 

OMNI in a new Custom Bourd Library Case 

made of bkick simulated leather It's built to 

last, and it will keep 12 issues in mint 

condition indefinitely. The spine is embossed 

with the gold Of^NI logo, ar>d in each case 

there is a gold transfer for 

recording the date. 

Send your check or money order 

($8.95 eoch; 3 for $24.95; 6 for $45.95) 

postpaid USA orders oniy. Foreign 

orders odd S 1 .50 odditionol for 

postage ond handling per cose. 

To; Ofy^Ni MAGAZINE 

Jesse Jones Industries, 499 E. Erie Ave. 

Phila., PA 19134 

CREDIT CARD HOLDERS (orders over $15) 

CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-972-5858 

Or mail your order, clearly showing your 

account number ard signature. Po. residents 

odd 6% soles tax, 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 




Discover What The Casinos 

Don't Want You To Know 

About Video Poker! 

Experience all the fasi-paced excitement of 
casino poker slots in the most vivid, excit- 
ing video poker program ever developed 
for the PC. Find out what cards to hold and 
why. Test strategies with the Simulator. 
Experiment with options - bet units, coins 
played, payoff rates. Even print out a guide 
to lake to the casino if you go! 
Features include on-line strategy advice, 
complete session statistics, tip rich 40-page manual, realistic 
color graphics. Even if you never go to the casino, you'll enjoy 
the endless challenge of this exciting game. 

'*Not only does it simulate a 'casino-quality* video poker 
screen with excellent graphics, but it provides an online 
expert to help players acquire the skill they need to win," 

PCM Magazine 3/91 

''Strategic Video Poker is one of the most complete pro- 
grams to be released. For any video poker player, [it J is the 
light at the end of the tunnel," The Player 12/90 

Order Now! 
$49.95 

plus S5 shipping & handling 
(PA residents add S3.30 tax) 

Visa/MC call toll-free: 

800-828-2259 ext. 410 




LWS SOFTWARE 

Dept. 4C • P.O. Box 688 
BroomalK PA 19008 



Requires IBM PC or compatible ; 5 1 2K: VG A, EGA, CG A or Mono. 



Circle Reader Service Number 127 



2 Books 15 Bucks 



40 Great Flight Simulator Adventures (C022X) 

40 More Great Flight Simulator Adventures (C0432) 

Flying on Instruments with Flight Simulator (C0912) 

Jet Fighter School (C0920) 

Learning to Fly with Flight Simulator (C1 153) 

The Electronic Battlefield (C117X) 

Sub Commander: Tactics and Strategy for WWII Submarine 
Simulations (CI 277) 

Gunship Academy: Tactics and Maneuvers for Attack Heli- 
copter Simulations (C1536) 

Realistic Commercial Flying with Flight Simulator (01 692) 

40 Great Submarine Simulator War Adventures (CI 722) 

Order your copies today. Minimum 2 books per order. Shipping 

and handling $1 per book ($5.00 for orders outside U.S. and 

Canada). 

Send check or money order (in U.S. funds only) and appropriate 

sales tax (if you live in NC. NJ, and NY). Canadian orders add 

7% goods and services tax. Mail to: 

COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauketi, NJ 08109 



Please include ISBN number on your check or money order. 
Offer good only while supplies last. 
Please allow four to six weeks for delivery 



JUL91CP2 



Get the 

OFFICIAL 
GUIDES 

to these Sierra Games 

The Official Book of 
King's Quest, 2nd Ed. 

cx>vers King's Quest 1-V 
$12.95 

The Official Guide to Roger 
Wilco's Space Adventures 

covers Space Quest l-IV 
$14.95 

The Official Boole of 
Leisure Suit Larry 

covers Larry l-!l! 
$12.95 

To order, send the titles and quantities of 
books ordered, checl< or money order,* and 
your name and complete street address; 

COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 

■Pleas* acid S2 sl"ipp<ng & handfcng (S6 lofetgn) tor ea*^ book 

(resKiente of NC. KkJ. NY ptease add appicabte sates tax} 

Canadian orders add 7*8 goods and sefvces tax. 

Alt payments musr be in U-S funds, Please aikjw 4 waaks lof 

delivery. 

Sierra. King's Ouest. Leisure Suit Larry, and Space Quest are 

copyrighi and/or fademarks oi Sierra On-Lne, Inc. JULSlCNS 



Earn $4,000 Per Month 

From Your Home 

With A Computer! 

Quit spending money on your compu- 
ter and let it earn money for you. This is 
a proven turn key business an individual 
or couple can run. If you purchase our 
software and business program, we will 
give you the computer and printer. If 
you already own a computer, you may 
receive a discount. You do not need to 
own, or know how to run, a computer 
— we will provide free, home office 
training. Financing available. 

Find out how other couples y and individuals like yourself, 
are building a lifetime income! 

To receive a free cassette and color literature, call toll-free: 

1-800-343-8014, ext. 303 

(in Indiana: 317-758-4415) Or Write: 

Computer Business Services, Inc*, CBC Plaza, Ste* 303, 

Sheridan, Indiana 46069 




^^'™.EE 



FREE CBS 286 Computer 



Circle Reader Service Kumber £30 




The Menu (tm) 

The "Premier" Hard Disk Drive Manager 



help rz-4kw Editor FG-flew UtUttJes ri-Other 



DtUUses 
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Desktop milxhlrtg 





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Uord F 


Gepy rUcs 
Dclde riles 
HeTMK riles 


terd rtrfcct 


terfaUr 


Dlrectonj 

Md a llrcctcry 

Delete i Urcctory 

neiw a. DlMCtOTV 

Tarnl « llsk 
RePMea Ub«l 
Disk titforiMtlEm 




Set Mit^tim 



llxflai,; a. pcrtaattizcd RCiufc cm tie twin scrcei. 
(See nodlfy tefaults at rwify Ihers) 



DUAL MENU SYSTEM 

MOUSE SUPPORT 

PASSWORD SECURITY SYSTEM 

TEXT EDITOR 

BUILT IN DOS UTILITIES 

CUSTOMIZED SCREEN COLORS 

ON-LINE HELP 



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1201 West Elm Avenue 
Hanover, PA 17331 

Phone: (717)633-7759 
Fax:(717)633-7878 



Circle Reader Service Number 203 



FREE -15 DISKS -FREE 
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IBM# APPLE][(K) APPLE GS^^ 
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since 1985 



Circle Reader Service Njmber 241 



BEAT THE LOTTERY 



29 Lotto Jackpot Winners Have Won 

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Dept. C-TO, P.O. Box 1519 
While Plains, NY 10602 

1 -a00-876-G-A-l-L(4245) or 914*761*2333 



Circle Reader Service Number IDS 



We recharge loner 
cartridges for laser 
printers and copiers 
for a fraction of the 
cost of replacement! 




• 24-hour turn-around 

• Satisfaction Guaranteed 

• Up to 50% more printing 
than with original cartridge 

• We buy used cartridges 

Canon. H?wiett'PscianlL25€r-jst, Apple-User 
Writer. Corona, QMS. IBM, Ricoh, Eliarp, etc 



mm- INTERNATIONAL 
t^ TONER CARTRIDGE 

313*666-9440 or 800-827-3058 
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Circle Reader Service Kumber 106 




mef>v 



GuOIIQEilPI^ to Improve 
Your Creative Wrilini*J 



'Fir»t rate.* --AuociAted Pre** 'The bottom line on 
WritcPro is tlut it'i f re«lJ* -NYFC Magawts 
WritePro's creadve writing ■oftwame tcicbei you bow to 
develop t>ciicv«bte charmctcfi, vtoriea, aixl dklofue. It 
gtvea you the tool* to create conflict^ heighten suspea»e 
utd hold ■ reader't attention, and it carrier a 30-DAV 
MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE. 'Stein'! teachiug 
method b direct, intuitive, and truly intermctive. I am 
indeed raving about WritcPro, It is a nearly perfect 
educational program. * -Con^uttr Sfwpp*r 
'You'll »ce immediate improvement' —Wrkw't Dignt 
"WritePro is wonderfully itraigbtforwanl m operation. 
The principles of good writiof are good for all kinds of 
writbg.* —Nation* M Busitt^at 'I highly r^ommexKl it, 
whether you're just itartinf to write or whether you can 
just use some brushing up. * — Natiooal Writera Club 
'This program seems about as goof-proof as a program 
can be, I have learned i good deal from it,* 
--EomM-OfJl€4 Computing "At the end, you have a 
creditable piece of work. But most importantly, it's 
fun! * "CompuUr Edp 'These are valuable leasoos for 
a would-be novelist ' -Thm Nww York Tiitua 
'As easy to use as a typewriter.* -^PC R§§our€€ 
Highest Rating, Alt Categories, —Newsbytca Join 
over 20,000 user* in 37 counlrieal WeffPro 7/2/3/4 ^ 
for IBM PCs is $79.9J (for M»cblwh S99.95) idd$5.00SdkH. 
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odl (BOO) 755']124orwrilcloTlK WritcPro CoipontloD, 
43 LiBdeoCifck, Scsrfeottjutb, NY lOJIO. CM 



Circte Reader Service Number 193 



COLOR RIBBONS & PAPER 



Colors: Black. Red. Blue. Green. Brown, Purple. Yellow 



Ribbons: 

Pfic8 each 



Brother 1109 
Cftizen 200/GSX 140 
Citizen GSX 140, 4-Co!or 
Epson MX/f=X/RX 80/85 
OkkJata 182/192 
Panasonic 1190/1124 
Commodore MPS 
Star NX1000 
Star NX1000, 4-Color 



Black 



$4.95 
4.00 

3.75 
5.00 
5.00 
Call 
3.50 



Color 



$5.95 

5,00 

* 

4.50 
7,50 
7.50 

For 
4.50 
6.25 



T-Shlrt 
Ribbons 



$7.00 
7.50 

6,75 



Price 
6.75 

10,00 



T-Shin (Heal Transfer) Ribbons 
CoJors: Black. Red. Blue. Green. Brown. Purple, Yellow 



COLOR PAPER 

Color Paper 200 aheeis assorted 

Bfi'ohl Pack: 9-1/2x11 S10.90/pk 

Pastel Pack: 9-1/2x11 S 7.9(ypk 

Color Certifcate Paper: 100 sheets S 9.95/pk 

Color Banner Paper: 45 ft/rpli S 8.95/pk 



Min. orders S25.00. Wm'mum S4H S4.S0, Call for oth^f ribbons and 
supplies. Price and spec are sijbiect to change w/o notice. 



RAMCO COMPUTER SUPPUES 

PO. Box 475. Manteno. IL 60950 U.S.A. 

(USA) 800522-6922 or 815-468-8081 

(Canada) 800621-5444 



Circle Reader Service Number 221 



Disk #1 • /^ unbelievable 

vjsual encounter ■ MUST SEE" 

Disk #2 • NEW! 3 

ercounter games for trends and 

lovers guaranteed to s^«J botn 

clothes ana tnhiDitions 

Disk #3 • A/1 anatomical 

arcade game with unusual 

ammunition 

Disk #4*2 more incredible 

visual encountei^ - impress your 

friends 

Disk #5 • Deale your owrr 

fantasies about (nends & tovers 

D^ #6 • feW! V>ew. print. 

Of edi; ten srzzling pictures 

irtcluding celebnties 

$7 eadi any 3 for S17, or 

all 6 tcK $32. Rr IBM & 

compai CGA. ECjA w Xi* 



ADULT 
SOFTWARE 



CONNOISSEUR 

COLLECTION 

ALLNEW!ln256ColQrVGAI! 
Disk #CC1 • • yOO BE THE 
STAR ♦ Ilie FIRST CtiSTOMlZASLE 
movfie alKws you to wnte 0ie dialog 
and the tite Von can star wflh tfie 
partner of your chotce Incredtbie 
scenes display w-m your dialog ONLY 
AVAILABLE f RO^M US' 
Disk #CC2 • THE RBST SOUND 
MOVE! The first computer move 
wtti SOUND See me n credible 256 
color VGA graphics while hearing Itie 
actual dialog OURS EXCLUSrVELV 
Disk «CC3 • THE BEST MOVEI 
The best computer rmvie avada&ie 
Onfy lof the serious cdtector 256 
stunning VGA colors 
1 Move $29 2 Mwie S49 3 Move $65 
Afl CC Disks Requ re VGA morntw 
and haro dish —over t MB ol action 



graphics req d 
ADO S3 S'H ■ 35' OR FCKEIGN (jRDCflS AOO S2 PtR EKSK • IN F% ADO TAX 

VISA/MC Orders only 
800-243-1515 Ext. 600FJ 

24 HOURS / 7 DAYS • MUST STATE AGE O/ER 21 

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THE COMPETITION ISN'T EVEN CUDSEll 





Easily 
Convert 
Images to 
BMP, GIF, 
IMG, MAC, 
PCX, RLE 

MEGABYTES of color images in every product 

U SOI .... Swimsuits i6 color 14.88 256 color 19,83 

# 602, 603, 604, 605 and 606 

X-Rated iscolor 14.88 256COlor 19,83 

#105.... 601 ' 603 ...... 16 color 37.88 256 color 49.83 

#106.... 604-606 ...... 16 color 37.88 256 color 49.88 

#107.... 601 -606 16 color 72.88 ...... 256 color 94.88 



Irvclude S3 SAH 
Add S3 lof tweign 



Send Check or Mon©^ Ordef to: 

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P.O. Sox 4t6a . D«pt. 28 

DwTtield Bch, FL 33442 Add $3 for 3 S" 

(305)426*4551 FLadd6% 

MUST STATE AGE 2} 



Circle Reader Service Number 130 



PC/r Owners!! 



Enrythinff You 'If Em Hrni Plus Much, Much Mmtl 

• Memory Sidecars - Expand now to 1.2 MB! 

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► 20, 30, 40, 60 & 80MB Hard Disic Drive Systems 

• 101-Key Enhanced PCjr Keyboards 

► Serial Port Compatibility Boards 

• Modifications for Tandy Compatibility 

• PCjr Compatible Software & Game Canridges 
» PCjr System Units with I28K or 256K 

• Diagnostic Service Only $25 

• Replacement I^rts and Repair Service 



RemetTtber— Whan you pitrchtte all ytiur PCjr pmducti 

from PC Entefprlttf you'll never natd to worry 

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foitum owr 300 PCir prtidi^cti on 56 pagflt. 

Call or wrlti for your FREE copy todiyfl 



(800) 922-PCjr (201) 280-0025 



iKnaEBaiaBa 



"Thejr Products Group 
PO Box 292 Belmar, NJ 07719 

• 'Dedkmed to the Support of the PCjr Since 1984" 
Circle Reader Service Number 1t>5 



(g) SOFTSHOPPE, INCX 

ASP Member 



o Selected Programs 
a Latest Versions 
Q As Low as $1.50 



FREE CATALOG 
IBM PD/SHAREWARE 

POB 3678, Ann Arbor, Ml 48106 



Call 800-829-8EST (2378) 

or 313-761-7638 

Fax 313-761-7639 



Circle Reader Service Numtwr 126 



Circle Reader Service Number 116 



NEW SOFTWARE FOR HOME SEWERS 
MAKES CUSTOM FITTING A SNAPl 
Introducing DRESS 
SHOP""', the exciting new 
way to use your PC. Pal- 
terns for more than two 
dozen garments are con- 
tained on an IBM disk: 
dresses, blouses, skirts, 
slacks, blazers, vests, etc. 
All can be tailored to your 
exact measurements for 
the most flattering fit pos- 
sible. 
Requires 640K, and a dot-matrix printer with form- 
feed paper. Both 5-1/4" and 3-1/2" disks included. 

MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE I 
To order, send $99.95 (CA Reside nls add 6% sales tax) to; 

LivingSoft, Inc. 

3400 Ave. of the Arts, iJ202 

Dept. C 

Costa Mesa, CA 92626 




For more information, call: 
(800)626-1262 or (714)979-5829 



Circle Reader Service Number 158 



Conquering 

Super 
Mario Bros. 



Here's the book you need to beat all three 
Super Mario Bros, games. No matter where 
you're stuck, this is the book that will help you 
get back on the winning path. Bowser doesn't 
stand a chance! 

To Order send $7.95 plus $2 shipping and handling for 
each book ($4 Canada, $6 foreign} and applicable tax* to: 

COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McCIellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 

* Residents of NC, NJ, and NY add appropriate sales lax. Canadian 
orders please add 77o Goods and Services tax. 

All orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Please 
allow four weeks for delivery. 

Offer good wfiile supplies last. 

Super Maiio Bros, is a registered trademark of Nintendo of America, Inc. 

JULdlCSM 



Thoroughbred^Greyhound^Trotter/Pacer 



"Highest rated 
handicapping^ 
software 
since 
1983" 



^DEMO DISKS 

$5.00 

(refundable) 



lie?? 



PROFESSIONAL 

HANDICAPPING 

SYSTEMS™ 

Available at your local 

software dealer or call 

for Information and a 

FREE CATALOG. 

1-800-553-2256 

1940 W. State St.. Boise, ID 83702 



Circle Reader Service Number 151 



lu're in flight . . . V^^ the c 



You're in flight 

Suddenly out of nowhere, A 
MIG appears behind you. It's 
closing fast. Missile alert! You hit 




the chaff ejector; break left! Mis- 
sile launch break rightl You 
shove throttles to Maxximum 
afterburner; jinx left to get into 
firing position. Now! Gear down! 
Air brakes! FIRE! Mission accom- 
p\\she6. 

Congratulations. You have just 
entered a new dinnension in real- 
ism. Whether "threading the 
needle," or attempting a difficult 
approach. Maxximum Company 
products give you the precision 
you always wanted in computer 
flying. 

Works with your favorite 

programs. Call the 

factory for 

a dealer 

nearest 

f/ you. 




Circle Reader Service Number 14S 
JULY 1991 COMPUTE 141 



THE DEFINITIVE MAGAZINE AND DISK 

FOR PC USERS 



COMPUTEI's PCi 



B4CfC ISSUES 



Note: 

• Selected titles are listed under con- 
tents for each issue 

• 3V2'inch disi^s available for all issues 
except t^arch 1988 and May 1988 

• Programs requiring more than 256K or 
a color monitor are so noted 

March 1988, [ssue 4, Vol. 2, No. 2 

Feature 
Flying Home: Rigftt Simulator adventure 

Software on Disk 
TheDraw: Design custom menu screens, presenta- 
tions, or animated sequences 
Tonto!: Pop-up with ASCII ctiart, clock/calendar, 
directory, tiex converter, ke> board scan code 
reader, and printer setup 
Font Typeset ten New- fonts for your printer 
(CGA) 

Designing Custom Fonts; Create your own fonts 
for Font Typesetter (CGA) 
FileFinder: Locate any file, in any directory 
SuperTiler: More power for B ASICs RMNT (CGA) 
Hover: Futuristic tennis game (CGA) 
DOS Help: Help screens for DOS commands 

May 1988, Issue S, Vol. 2, No. 3 

Feature 
Advanced Spreadsheets: Special tecliniques for 
power tools 

Software on Disk 
Quick Sctieduler: Organize yourselfl 
Source Code XREF: Debugging made easy 
Text File Compare: Find out which file is which 
WHOA!: Control your PC's speed (EGA not 
supported) 

Las Vegas Solitaire: Solitaire with casino rules 
States & Capitals: Learn U,S. geography and have 
some fun (CGA) 
QikServe: Arcade fun in a fast-food setting (CGA) 



July 1988, Issue 6, Vol. 2, No. 4 

Features 
How to Build Your Own PC Clone: Expert advice 
on a mone)-saving alternative 
In Praise of PC Play: PC blasts into the game 
market 

Talking to Your Printer: Make your printer do alt 
its (ricks 

Buyer's Guide to Simulation Software: 38 excit- 
Ing games put you in command 

Software on Disk 
JLSCAN: Super file lister 
Presentation Graphics: Create professional- 
looking graphs and charts (CGA) 
File-It: Save text screens to disk 
Graphics Shape Editor: Design your own graphics 
for games (CGA) 

Ancient Empires: The glory of battles past (CGA) 
Power Poker: An old favorite with a new twist 



March 1989, Issue 10, Vol. Z, No. 2 

Features 
Laser Power from Your DotMatHx Printer: 

Supercharge your 9-pin printer 
RAM Charge! How to Expand Your PCs Mem- 
ory: Everything you need to know 
Buyer's Guide to Expanded Memory Boards: 83 

memory boards for more RAM power 



COMPLETE YOUR 

COLLECTION! 

ANY ISSUE JUST $16 

Issues not listed are 

sold out. Limited 
quantities available. 

ORDER TODAY 



Software on Disk 
Arcade Volleyball: Klectnfying on-courl action 
Spin 'n' Print: Print spreadsheets sideways (CGA) 
HDtest: Tune up your hard disk 
Cribbage: The game of kings and queens 
FixBeep: Control your PC s speaker 
CobrSet: Choose your own screen palette (CGA) 



May 1989, Issue II, \bl. 3, No. 3 

Features 
Game Designers' Favorite PC Games: Five pros 

pick their favorites 

How to Install a Hard Disk: It's as easy as 1-2-3 

Future Games: Put your imagination into 

overdrive 

Buyer's Guide to Sports Games: 62 super 

diversions 

Software on Disk 
Iskib: Save the planet from hostile aliens (CGA) 
Dr. Steeptite and the Nightmare Factory: Foil 
the villain and destroy his Dream Machine (CGA) 
Block Out: Fast-paced strategy for the whole fam- 
ily (CGA or EGA) 

Vmusic: Compose and play three-part music 
Rich Levin's Checkup: Defend your system 
against virus attack 

Searchin: Find the text you want— fast! 
Subdir: Soar through directories 
Snooper: Uncover messages hidden in program 
files 



July 1989, Issue 12, Vol. 3, No. 4 

Features 
PC Video Systems Made Easy: It's all in the 
cards 
Desktop Publishing Revolutioii: (kt started in 

style 

King's Quest IV: A new dimension in PC 

entertainment 

Buyer's Guide to Desktop Publishing Software: 

50 hot publishing packages: 101 clip*art collections 

Software on Disk 
TurboTYPE: Kiss DOS's TYPE command good*bye 
CGA: At last! CGA programs on your monochrome 
graphics card 

MenU'Matic: One keypress runs any program 
Nifty James' Famous Utilities: Zap backups, cal- 
culate online, and get a quote for the day 
PrtL^bel: Design and print custom labels 

September 1989, Issue 13, Vol. 3, No. 5 

Features 
Best-Kept Secrets: Five word processors priced at 

under $100 

Learning is FUN!: 60 games that instruct and 

delight 

CD-ROM: Dazzling new graphics and sound 
Buyer's Guide to SelMmprovement Software: 
70 ways to improve your skills and career 



Software on Disk 
Lampies of Lotis IV: Aiiens meet their match! 
WPK: Ward processing for kids 
DOS Help: Never look up a command again 
Touch Type Tutor: Be a keyboard superstar 
QDups: Zap duplicate files in a flash 



November 1989» Issue 14, Vol. 3, No. 6 

Features 
Hot Paint: How to get started with PC art 
Get It Together with Integrated Software: 5 pro- 
grams that do it all 
Online Art: Best PC graphics 
Buyer's Guide to integrated Software: 30 inte- 
grated solutions; 16 desktop organizers 

Software on Disk 
MemTooi: Organize your desktop 
To_Qulck: Subdirectories at your fingertips 
DynaBoot: Reboot any configuration 
BIO-CAL: Master biorhjihms 
Kingdom of Kroz: Run for your life! 

March 1990, Issue 16, Vol. 4, No, 2 

Features 
High-End Word Processors: Four writers meet 
four top-rated tools 

Power Breakthrough: How to Upgrade to a 386 
FYI: Floppy Disks 

Buyer's Guide to 386 Motherboards: High- 
powered replacements 

Future Computing: Expert's guide to neural 
networks 

Software on Disk 
CheX: Masterful checkbook manager 
Viruscan: Detect viruses before they strike 
Whereis: Never lose a file again 
HexEdit: F>dil hexadecimal like a pro 
Upgrade: Hands-on advice for upgrading to a 386 



Individual back issues of COMPUTEI's PC Magazine 
and disk are available by mail only while quantities 
tast> Please clip or photocopy, and mail completed 
coupon and check to: 
COMPUTE Publications 
324 W. Wendover Ave. 
Suite 200 
Greensboro, NC 27408 



Name. 
Street . 
City- 
state- 



Issue (Monlh/Year) 



, ZIP. 



Price 



$2,00 



Subtotal: 

Sales Tax: 

Shipping: 

Total: ___ 

Issues are Si6 each. Residents of NC and NY 
please add appropriate sales tax for your area. 



CLASSIFIEDS 



SOFTWARE 



IBM - COMMODORE 64 & 128 - AMIGA. 
lOOO's of PD/Shareware programs on lOO's 
of disks. Free listing or $1 for large 
descriptive catalog {specify computer). 
DISKS OTLENTY INC.. 7958 Pines Blvd., 
Suite 270B. Pembroke Pines, FL 33024 

BUY/SELL used software! Lowest Prices! 

Free list. Specify 64/128, Amiga or IBM. 

Centsible Software, PC Box 930, 

St. Joseph, Ml 49085. 616-962-0327 

FREE! IBM PD & SHAREWARE DISK CATALOG 

Specify 5V* or 3V:. Low prices since 1988 ! 
ASP APPROVED VENDOR, Fin to Software, 
Dept M, Rt 2 Box 44, Rosebud, TX 76570 

DO YOUR OLD GAMES RUN TOO FAST on your 
new PC? TSR program slows your 286/386/ 
486 to XT speed. Send $9.95 + 52.00 S/H to 
DSl, 13633 128th Ave N.E. Kirkland, WA 
98034 or call 206-454-7336 

IBM Compatible PD and Shareware. 
Programs as low as 12 cents each. Send $1 
for catalog disk to: SMJ SOFTWARE. Dept 
PC, 2912 SHERMAN AVE. RQCKFORD, IL 61101 

C64-C128-IBM / lOOO's of PD Prgs on 950 + 
dsks/ Prices LOW as 65 c per dsk/Cat & 4 
Samples dsks S4.00/ MECATRONIC SOFTWARE 
807 W. Pine, Suite *i3/Missou]a, MT 59802 

COLL. ALGEBRA. Equation solving programs 
for Tandy PC-6. Listing $19.95. Cassette 
$29.95. SASE for info, FORMULA SYSTEMS 
INC. P.O. Box 348, Roseville, MI 48066 

ALPHA/THETA BRAINWAVE STIMUUTION SOFTWARE 
for IBM or 100% clones. Why pay S300.00 
plus for brainwave stimulation devices? 
Our low-cost program allows experimentation 
with selectable colors, patterns and 
frequencies. Let your PC generate hypnotic 
pulses! Requires color monitor whh EGA or 
VGA card. Warning! Epileptics must not use! 
5Vr $19,95 3V2" $21.95. Templehof, Dept. 
113-CT, POB 19300, Austin TX 78760-9300 

NEURAL NETWORKS for your IBM compatible. 
EG A/ VGA software from $10. Free catalog 
or $5 for demo. Intellimetrics, 

4508 Cheltenham Dr., Bethesda, MD 20814 

NATIONAL USED SOFTWARE CLASSIFIEDS 
Buy or Sell used software nationwide 
IBM - Mac - Commodore - others 

1-800-779^5007, toll-free 




WIN UTTTO MILLIONS! 

NEW DOS RELEASE! 
TOUR LOfTTEHY IS BIASED! Un- 
intemionally certain number patterns 
will be selected with a greater frequerK^ 
than others, LOTTO MCKIII 3 wiii uncover & 
exploft these biases & tell yw which numbers to 
play— no guesswork required! 6UJUIANT1E0 to work 
for all lotteries worldwide or your miOHET BACK! WHEEL- 
ING now included in DOS version! BEAT THE LOTTEflT 
lODAT! $38.85 (+2.55 s/hj. 3.5" add S5. Ver. Z1 for Apple 
II & C64/128. NY add tax. 
OBOER TODAY! 1-B00'835-224fi X 121 
6E R10GE SERVICES, INC., 170 Broadway, 
Suite 201-CP, New York. NY 10038 
Info/Dealers 718-317-1961, 



HARDWARE 



SOFTWARE PLUS - Your Commodore, Amiga + 
IBM connection! lOOO's of generic + orig. 
prgnns, hardware -t- computer systems. For 
catalog, write: SOFTWARE PLUS, 64 W. Cutts, 
Btddeford, ME 04005 or call 207-284-9426. 



Tandy 1000 Subscribe to "One Thousand" 
the magazine for your Tandy 1000. Send $7 
for 3-mos trial or $24 for one year 
(12 issues plus free software disk) to: 
OTM, Box 1688 A, Mar\-Iand Heights MO 63043-0688 

DISCOUNT COMPUTER BOOKS. Thousands of 
titles available. Please call or write 
for your free catalog today. BOOKWARE, 
147 Campville Rd., Northfield, CT 06778 
(203) 283-6973 (800) 288-5662 



COMPUTER REPAIR 



24 HOUR Computer Repair. Commodore, 
Amiga, IBM, Apple. A & M Computer 
Repair, 20 Guernsey Dr. New Windsor, 
NY 12553. 914-562-7271 1-800-344-4102 

Auth. Comm. repairs C64/128, 1541/1571, 
SX64, 128D & Amiga. Selling DTK-comp 
computers. Quick service'30 day warranty 
MOM & POP's Computer Shop. 114 M. i6th, 
Bethany, MO 64424 (816) 425-4400 

SERIAL PORT TESTER SAVE $S$ ON SERVICE 

CALLS. Simple, plans to build serial, 

par port tester. For tester plans + disk, 

send $6.95 to; INF Computer, 921 Wherry Rd. 

#10, O'Fallion, IL 62269. 



COMPUTE Classified is a low-cost way to tell over 355,000 micro- 
computer owners about your product or service. 
Additional Information. Please read carefully. 

Rates: S38 per line, minimum of four lines. Any or all of the first line set in capital letters at no 
charge. Add $15 per line for boldface words, or $50 for the entire ad set in boldface (any num- 
ber of lines.) 

Terms: Prepayment is required. We accept checks, money orders, VISA, or MasterCard. 
Form: Ads are subject to publisher's approval and must be either typed or legibly printed. One 
line equals 40 letters and spaces between words. Please underline ivords to be set in boldface. 
General [nformation: Advertisers using post office box number in their ads must supply per- 
manent address and telephone number. 

Orders will not be acknowledged. Ad will appear in next a%'ailabie issue after receipt. 
Closing: First of the second month preceding cover date (e.g. October issue closes August 1,) 
CLASSIFIED DISPLAY RATES 

Classified display ads measure 2V*" wide and are priced according to height. T = $275; IV2' = 
$400; 2" = $525. Preferred supplied material is Velox or PMT. 
HOW TO ORDER 

To place an ad, send order and payment to Sharon Steinkemper, Classified Manager, 
COMPUTE, 1965 Broadway, New York, NY 10023-5965, or call Sharon Steinkemper at 212- 
724-0911, FAX 212-724-0825. 



SERIAL PORT TESTER SAVE $$$ ON SERVICE 

CALLS. Simple, plans to build serial, 

par port tester. For tester plans + disk, 

send $6.95 to: INF Computer, 921 Wherry Rd. 

#10, OTallion, IL 62269. 



EDUCATION 



EVANGELISTIC, TEACHING, treasure-hunt 
game for the C64/128 on 5%' disk. 
255 scrolls of Scripture to find. 
$18.50/disk. U.S. funds only. N.Y.S. 
residents add local sales tax. Or send 
S.A.S.E. for more info to: B & V HANCO 
PO Box 11, Rome, NY 13440. 



Call 
212-724-0911 

for 

Classified Ad 

Information 



B.S. & M.S. in COMPUTER SCIENCE 

The Aniefican kistrtuie fix Compuier Soenas oilMS an m dcpSi cofrespon- 
oenoe progfam to Mfn yoa Bachew of Sctencc and Master c* Sctencc de- 
flrees m Computer Soencs A home BS subjects covefed aie MS/DOS. 
BASIC. PASCAL C, Data Fde Proctssjng Dita StnK:tarei A Opera&ig sys- 
tems MS pfograiti tndudes ^ub^s m Software Etx^neenng and ArtrfioaJ 
Intelligence, and oiher topics, 

AMERICAN iKST. for COMPUTEn SCIENCES 

3101 CC Magnoha Avb Soutt. Suite 2O0 

Btrnwighani. AL 35205 

600-767-2427 CAU (20S) 933-0339 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



Let the government finance your new or 
existing small business. Grants/ loans to 
$500,000. Free recorded message: 707-449-8600(KS7) 



WANTED: A mighty hero to save the lands 
of Tirela from Its deranged ex-king. To 
undertake QUEST FOR TRUTH, the new adv. 
role-playing game for C64, send $8 -I- $2 
S/H to Q/T, PO Box 295, Cartfiage, IN 46115. 



ISOMETRICS The businessman's total stay fit 
program book, 20 dynaniic muscle-toning 
exercises. Can be done anywhere. No spec 
equip- lllustrd. Send $4 to: LLL Pub, 
POB 438, Unthicum HIS, MD 21090. 



SUPPLIES 



GO FIRST CLASS! 100 Sheets of Quality 
Computer Paper. "PERSONALIZED" with your 
name and address. Add distinctive touch 
to your letters. Only $14.95 + $3.55 s/h 
($18.50). SATISFACTION GUARANTEED! Send 
to: Print Trax, Box 905C, Burlington, NC 27216, 



Research works. 







American Heart 
Association 



JULY 1991 



COMPUTE 143 




FAST FACTS 



Public interest in using a home computer to obtain information 
online from the public library (in percent): 



Very interested 



Somewhat Interested 



Not Interested 



] 



i 



34 



34 



32 



According to a recent report published by the American Library Association (ALA), two out of three Ameri- 
cans would like to use a home computer to connect with the public library. The report was based on a sur- 
vey conducted for the ALA by Louis Harris and Associates and sponsored by Equifax. The report also said 
that 46 million Americans — 25 percent of the population — have or have access to a home computer to 
make such a connection. 



EXCELLENCE IN SOFTWARE AWARDS: 1991 

This past March, the Software Publishers Association met in San Francisco and granted awards for what its members con- 
sidered the best in software for the past year. The Association presented awards for business and consumer products. In ad- 
dition, the SPA's Consumer Software and Critics' Choice sections presented several other prizes, including one for best 
industry analysis to Keith FerreU, a former senior editor with COMPUTE and now editor of Omni magazine. 



BUSINESS SOFTWARE AWARDS 

BEST NEW BUSINESS SOFTWARE 

PRODUCT 

Microsoft Windows 3.0 

Microsoft 

BEST BUSINESS APPLICATION: 

GRAPHIC OR DISPLAY 

ORIENTATION 

aliCLEAR 

CLEAR Software 

BEST BUSINESS APPLICATION: 
NUMERIC OR DATA 
ORIENTATION 
Quattro Pro 2.0 
Borland International 

BEST BUSINESS APPLICATION- 
WORD OR TEXT ORIENTATION 
Ami Pro 
Lotus Development 



BEST PROGRAMMING TOOL 
Turbo C+ + Professional 
Borland International 

BEST UTILITY PROGRAM 
The Norton Uiilities 5.0 
Symantec 

BEST VERTICAL MARKET 

APPLICATION 

Ashlar Vellum 

Ashlar 

CONSUMER SOFTWARE AWARDS 

BEST COMPUTER PROGRAM 
Geo Works Ensemble 
GeoWorks 

BEST ACTION/ARCADE PROGRAM 
Faces . . . Tris HI 
Spectrum HoloByte 



BEST FANTASY ROLE- 
PLAYING/ADVENTURE PROGRAM 
King's Quest V 
Sierra On-Line 

BEST PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY/ 
CREATIVITY PROGRAM 
Geo Works Ensemble 
GeoWorks 

BEST SIMULATION PROGRAM 

SimEarth 

Maxis 

BEST SPORTS PROGRAM 

Links 

Access Software 

BEST STRATEGY PROGRAM 
Railroad Tycoon 
MicroProse Software 



144 COMPUTE 



JULY 1 9 9^ 1 



COMPUTE'S Free 
Product Information 
Resource 

Use these cards to request 
FREE information about prod- 
ucts advertised in this issue. 
Clearly prim or type your full 
name, address and phone num- 
ber. Only one card should be 
used per person. Circle the num- 
bers that correspond to the key 
number appearing on the 
advertisement and in the 
Advertisers Index. 

Mail the Postage-Paid card to- 
day. Your inquir>^ will be 
forvvarded promptly to the 
advertisers. Althougli every ef- 
fort is made to ensure that only 
advertisers wishing to provide 
product information have reader 
service numbers, COMPUTE 
cannot be responsible if 
advertisers do not provide lit- 
erature to readers. 

Please use these cards only for 
requesting product information. 
Editorial and customer service 
inquiries should be addressed to: 
COMPUTE, RO. Box 5406, 
Greensboro, NC 27403. Cards 
are valid only until the expira- 
tion date. 



USE THESE CARDS AND 
THIS ADDRESS FOR 
COMPUTE PRODUCT 
INFORMATION ONLY. DO 
NOT SEND PAYMENT IN 
ANY FORM, 



COMPUTE INFORMATION SERVICE 



Nairte - 



Address . 
City 



State/Province _ 



.Zip. 



Country - 



Pnooe _ 



A wnai Hind o1 coniput«r(s) do you own'> Q ISM PC c cqrTiipatrE>se O Tandy U Amga 

1 ^ 3 

DMaantosn DApp»ei( a CommocJofe 64/128 
4 5 6 

B IS tfus youf 1ff« compule*'' D Tfttt DWo 

C How lortg have you owr*d your compyter? , Vears Months 

9 10 

Oo you Lj*e youf compuier mostly for O playiing games D vwrtti^ at tvjrm Q wofkmg at Oflice 

11 12 13 

SKJe Home D sc^oo( wofk/learning' 
H 
£ Do you f«d COVPUTE s new lormat t»eOtul m tmding uilotrnatcn you need'' Q ¥bs CTto 

F wnal otner awrtpulef niagazme do you read' D PG/Computmg D Home CHfce Computing 

\7 IB 

n Compuier Sftoppef D PC Sources O f*C Magaiirw D PC World 
19 20 21 22 

G VVr.at rs your toiat rrousehoid fficome' D -S30.000 U -540,000 D -550,000 D >S7S.000 

33 24 2B 2& 

H Whal IS your age'? Years 

27 

1 How many Times per year do ypu purcfiase Oy matt ordw'' D 1 O 3-5 D S-TO D -10 

2B 29 30 31 

J Oo you atlvise tA^vr 

K Comments - — -- 



on comptJter purchases'* O'f&S Q No 
3? 33 



COMPUTE INFORMATION SERVICE 



City- 



. State/Province - 



.Zip. 



Country _ 



. Phooe. 



A Wrvai kmc oT conrpuief(s) do you own'> O IBM PC or compaftbte D Tandy D Am^ja 

1 2 3 

D Macimosh n Appi«e II D Commodore 64/1 £a 
4 5 6 

B Is tf*5 yt3ur firsl computef^ O res DNo 
7 B 

. Months 



C How long have you owned your oomputsf' ™ ~ Years _ 

9 10 

Do you use your computer mostty fof D playing garms D wofKtfig at home Q working at o(tiC« owt- 

11 12 13 

SKte fxjme Q SCfiOOt worK/learning'* 
M 
E Do you lind COMPUTE s new Tormal neipluf m lincJing mform^tton you need'' D Ves ONo 

F V&iai othef computer magazff>e do you reacP D PC/Compucr^ D Home Otlce Computng 



17 



\S 



D Compuler ^lOpper □ PC Sources D PC Magazme U PC VAjfiO 
19 20 i^ 22 

Q What IS your total hou5«*ioW ■ncome'' D -$30000 D -540.000 D -S50.000 D -S75.0O0 

23 24 25 26 

H wnai IS your age' . Yeafs 

27 
I How many times per yeat do you purchase by mail order'' Q 1 Q 3-5 □ S-lO D >10 

23 29 30 31 

J Do you aa^iise otre* people on computer purchases'' a ves [I No 

32 33 
K Comrnents 



10^ 


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ni 


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36? 


3fi3 


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5 






Expiration 


date 9-3-91 



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1B2 


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^m 


1R6 


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1B9 


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19? 


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5 






EstplratSon date 9-3-91 



GIVE 

connpuTE 

AND SHARE 
THE FUN 
(AT 63% 

SAVINGS!) 



WOW! connpuTE 

REAIIY IS THE PERFECT GIFT! 



n YESI Send COMPUTE to the person 
listed here, as my gift. They'll get a full 
year of computing fun - 12 jam-packed 
issues -and, at just $12.97, I'm saving 
a whopping 63% off the $35.40 that a 
year of COMPUTE would cost at the 
newsstand! 

Send COMPUTE to: 

Name „ , 



Address- 
City 



From: 

Name 



Address- 



City- 



_State_ 



_Zip_ 



Q I'd prefer to enclose payment now. □ Bill me. 
D Please charge my: D VISA i^ MasterCard 



Account No.. 



-Date- 



Sign at u re - 



..State Zip- 



Please allow 6-8 weeks for first-issue delivery. Canada and 
elsewhere, add $6 per subscription, payable in U.S. funds 
only. Regulaf subscription price is Si 9.94 for 12 issues. 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 853 PITTSFIELD, MA 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 

COMPUTE Magazine 

Reader Service Management Department 

P.O. Box 5145 

Pittsfieid, MA 01203-9654 

lll......ll..l,lll„n.ll.l.|.„ll,„|,lnl..lll.nl 




BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 853 PITTSFIELD, MA 



POSTAGE WILL BE mO BY ADDRESSEE 

COMPUTE Magazine 

Reader Service Management Department 

P.O. Box 5145 

Pittsfieid, MA 01203-9654 

III II..I.III.....II.I.I„,II.,.I,ImImIII..,I 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FfRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO, 1 1 2 HARLAN. !A 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 



CQIUIPUTE 

RO. BOX 3244 
HARLAN, lA 51593-2424 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

fF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 




NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 



USE 

THESE 

CARDS 

FOR FREE 

PRODUCT 

INFORMATION 



GIVE 

connpuTE 

AND SHARE 

THE FUN 

(AT 63% 

SAVINGS!) 



I.l,ln..ll.l.l.l.l.... Mm. I.I.I..ImI,I.ImI. 1,1.1 



Call Our Number. 

CompuServe, the world's largest and most comprehensive network 
of people with answers to your hardware and software questions, is 
waiting to hear from you. 

For more information about CompuServe and our product 
support services, just mail this card or call 
800848-8199. 

Name^ ________^_ _^^ 

Add rpsf^ 

City. State. Zip _^ 

Telephone (^ .) CoiiipuServe' 



COMPUTE - July 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS PRRMIT NO. 407 COLUMBUS, OHIO 



I^STAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 



CompuServe® 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
PO BOX 20212 
COLUMBUS OH 43220-9988 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 





l.l.il..lli..l.lnl.lll.i.l.l..l.liil«.l.l,.l..iil.l 




TheGSX-145 

Makes Your Forecasts 

Even Brighter. 



Once :igain (Citizen iusserLs ils leadership in color print technolo^n: 
Introducing the new 24-\vire wide carriage GSX- 145. 

Like the GSX-140, the print qualit)^ rivals that of any printer in its 
class, while iLs six resident fonts give you more flexihilit;^ to design 
your own output. 

Like all our new printers, it's equipped with our exclusive Color 
On CommaJid "' feature wiiich gives you the capiibilit)' of instiilling 
dynamic color to make your spread sheets color efficient, graphs e^isier 
to understand, and your presentiitions simply brilliant. 

S[)eaking of hrilliant, it doesn't take a 
Phi Beta Kiippa to operate the GSX-145. 
That's kcause the 0)mm:md-Vue'" 
control panel promptii you witli 
plain English directions on it5 
LC[) pimel. The *"Quick" menu 
gives instiuit access to the 
printer settings most often 
changed. It remembers your " 
four favorite software pro- 
grams iuiu sets them tip just 



^«»^«fliiiim@n^niH^«^i»MMK9i 



the way you like them, every time you use them. 
Blending 192 cps. logic seeking, hidirectiond 
printing and iiigh speed paper feed with our new 
sound supi)ression mechanism, the GSX- l4S's 
high throughput design quietly cranks out page 
after page faster than miy of the competition. 

What more could you ask for from a printer? 
How about peace of mind in the form of a 24- 
month parLs luid labor warnmty 

Once you've tried the new 
GSX- 145, it'll be easy to see how it makes your 
numbers look good. This time, in more ways 
ditUi one. For the dealer near you, just 
adl 1-800-556 -1234, extension 34, 
[^ (inGiliforniul-SOO-441-2345, 

^^ extension 34). 
1\| 




On/L-n, QAir t>rt t>immjnd, Q»nrt)atidlA'LK- and tiK- 



^CITIZEN 



Circle Reader Service Number 210 



I L 



B 



L 




gaming fot grownups.* .^ j. 1^, (5 25" 1 2 



ORDER BEFORE 

SEPT 1, 1991 

and receive 

a FREE URRY 
AUTOSHADE! 



Suggested Re.oi!Pri'« 
OffERtjO. 



S59.95 



TO ORDER CALL 



SIERRA 

1-800-326-6654 



UPGRADE 
OFFER 

If you turrenrty m leisure Suit iam in 
upgrade fo tk new' mm fo/Ss 
version or ttie fronf poge o mr nome 
,™lf f 5 fo cover die cosf of Hie 

(if ?36K Ann; ISU (jngrade 



to include your return 



sure 



wfieftier 



oDDfess, ond soy 



you II need 3.5" Of 5.25" drfs. 



Or send a check or money order for $59.95 to 
Sierra On-Lme, P.O. Box 485, Coarsegold, CA 93614 



Nowode-ordeKwillbeoccepredbv 
. telephone. 



1H dngoiM 1 kidiffiak if Sirn IVtU^ kiL Smo b ngiMatf noikncii of SsTD (]i><jii; 1^ 

Circle Reader Service Number 144